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Found 89 results

  1. Hi All, I took this picture by coincidence while trying to take photo of a single cloud on the sky. Is this Venus? Thanks.
  2. Hey guys. Thought about starting this thread. I feel like we all should inform eachother and newer members alike about the magngifications that can be achieved on planets,that provide the best sharpness/size ratio,depending on the scope and seeing. After this thread has grown a bit, i feel like this should be pinned,as to provide a little guide to newer members that are not experienced with planetary observing,as many will be fooled with the typical 50x per inch of aperture and get disappointed when they find that that image will be dim and blurry. For my 8” F/6 Sky-Watcher Dob For Saturn i like to use 150x in medium seeing and if i want something a bit bigger , switch to 240x ,which will give me a bigger,but blurrier image.iBut In good seeing, i found that 240x was very usable.When we have perfect conditions, i m certainly trying 300x. Mars, isnt very big in the sky right now,so even at high magnifications like 300x it still appears as a small orange dot. For observing mars,I suggest waiting for it to reach opposition.It benifits hugely from it! However,this happens once every 2 years....But 5ere are other planets to keep you occupied until then, such as jupiter,saturn and Venus. For Venus, i use 50-100-120 depending on its phase. For Jupiter, i like to use 150x, as it provides a very sharp image,with key features of the planet such as bands being very detailed.Waiting on my 6mm UWA Skywatcher to bring it to 200 and see how that plays out. Be careful! Don’t magnify jupiter too much, as it will loose much of its features and sharpness. Neptune and Uranus: These two will not impress, but are certainly have a nice colour to them. Even ar high magnifications, such as 300x and 400x, they will look like small discs with color in them.Uranus will look be colored green and Neptune a fainter blue. Mercury About mercury...Havent gotten the chance to observe it ,so the guys will have to inform you about that? Feel free to give your own opinions as to give members a wider source of information to help them observe better ! Cheers and clear skies. Kronos
  3. Here's a couple of quick hand held shots from yesterday (30/6/15) of the conjunction. Not sure why I was too lazy to get the tripod out and do a proper job... anyhow here they are (might need to zoom in a bit on the wide shot to actual see the planets!). Both taken with a Canon EOS700D with a 50mm EF lens. The upload compression does take a bit away from them. Too much wispy cloud to get anything tonight... Cheers, Rob
  4. Venus and Uranus will be in conjunction, less than 4' apart, close enough to fit within a low power telescopic view. It will be a challenge to see Uranus at magnitude 5.9 in the evening twilight. Use Venus as your guide. A great astrophotography event!
  5. Since venus is very well placed at the moment, thought I'd have a look for the Ashen light (a faint earthshine-like illumination that some observers see in the dark portion of venus) I've been using a 7" refractor and TMB monocentric eyepiece to try to eliminate as much scatter as possible. A couple of weeks ago when the phase was a little fuller, there did appear to be a faint glow within the crescent but it definitely didn't extent to the whole disc. More of an oval. However once the crescent is very slim (last night) there's no real sign of this glow at all. When I use wide angle eyepieces with more glass, there is a general faint blob of glow all around venus mimicking in shape the glow I noticed when the phase was larger. I tried with an old Erfle eyepiece that has no coatings and got two venus' which was very pretty but added little to my studies. So after all that, I'm still not much the wiser. I'd be interested to hear the experiences of other observers with this phenomena A couple of weeks ago, there did appear to be a glow on the dark side but only over some of the disc and it's impossible to be certain if it's real or just light scatter Last night there was really no convincing ashen light at all with the refractor and the lowest scatter eyepiece I have Left: a modern wide angle eyepiece with more glass does introduce some darkside glow effect and interestingly it's oval again not circular. Right A 1950s uncoated erfle gives lots of ghosting but no darkside glow I saw some nice drawings on the BAA pages of venus in the late 50s where the ashen light was far more prominent at 1/3 phase than when venus was a slim crescent which is interesting because that's pretty much what i saw
  6. Hello and happy new year My first and last 2017's Venus In IR807 nothing to see but in UV this is not bad. Clear skies. Luc
  7. Don't you just love it when planets get together and put on a show? I must admit, it was quite a challenge imaging these two in the same telescopic view at first. I tried my little space cams but Venus was just too bright;"little" Neptune didn't have a chance, lol. So, I decided to first take a wide-field view of the area with my Nikon camera piggybacked to my Mak 127, and then a prime focus shot. Here's the wide-field shot, a single 20s exposure at f/5.6: and here is the prime focus shot, a quick 5 second exposure to keep Venus from being too bright: Enjoy! Reggie
  8. Venus is about 45% illuminated at the moment and is very bright in the evening sky. Over the next few weeks and months Venus will get closer to us and appear as more of a crescent. As usual I took far more shots than I needed so this is just a quick processing of the last one before a tree got in the way and I got too cold to stay out. Made from 1,000 frame video captured with FireCapture and processed in PIPP, Registax, and Photoshop. Equipment: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT Alt-Az Mount ZWO ASI120 MC imaging camera x3 Barlow lens
  9. This planetary conjunction forms a triangle with Jupiter(left), Mercury(top) & Venus(right) Pentax 645D Pentax 500mm lens @ f8 Exp. 1/4 sec. ISO 200 26th May 2013 Pentax Digital Camera Utility 4 Conjunction of Jupiter Mercury & Venus 26th May 2013 from Kelso by mikeyscope, on Flickr
  10. Ok, maybe not as dramatic as the title would suggest but still Santorini is a geo-active volcano system so I'm going to claim that one. So as some of you may know we have just returned from holidays in Crete and went to Santorini for the transit, the whole place was spectacular. Truly a worthy place for witnessing such a special event. We witnessed some great sights too while we were there, the rising of a near full blood red moon and the dramatic sunsets but that's for another thread possibly. We stayed in a hotel villa high on the rim of the caldera and had a perfect view eastward over the ocean, the weather leading up had been perfect and the morning before I had a succesful trial run in clear conditions and had everything worked out. Settings were honed, best location found etc... However, that evening some disturbing developments were afoot which left me feeling a bit uneasy. You guessed it, cloud. It was the type of cloud that only forms at the top of mountains and nowhere else, lenticular I think. So to my disgust this was the scen that I awoke to in the morning. Unbelieveable, there had not been a cloud in sight for are whole trip or the days after. Thankfully though as you may be able to see(I do have better pics of the effect) there was a thin strip of clear air between the horizon and the cloud which was situated right over my head, although at the time I wasn't sure how it was going to play out. So it was now a waiting game to see what would happen next. Then at precisely 6:02am local time a first glimmer of orange began to peek over the horizon, YES!!!! I was going to be able to see it. My first few shots however were way out... the change of seeing had dramatically changed the settings I had figured out a day before and this played havoc throughout the transit and my plans. But still I had some degree of success and I am thrilled to be able to of captured and share with you some of the photos I took. Santorini Transit by Jarrod Bennett, on Flickr I do have some white light pics as well which I'll post when I get around to checking all the SD cards. There was a good 30 min or so chunk of the transit that I missed due to the clouds as the Sun got higher but it reappered towards the end so I'll go through it all and see what I can come up with. It's also worth mentioning that the Polarie performed reasonably well on it's solar tracking rate too. All in all I'm ectstatic to have seen such a special event. Jarrod.
  11. Just watched this full transit video from SDO: http://venustransit.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/kiosk/dataset/Venus_AIA12s_304Track/phase/track Oddly enough, if you look carefully, you can see the surface features of the sun through Venus' disk! Anyone know why this might be? I have a couple of ideas, neither of which I am confident about: 1) The CCD picking up the image is retaining some energy from earlier images, causing a ghost on the CCD. My main problem with this idea is that there is a good amount of time (over a minute and a half) between images, so presumably, any ghost heat on the CCD should have dissipated? Aside from this, I have no idea whether residual heat on the CCD would cause such an image. 2) Radiation from the sun at certain wavelengths is passing through Venus? As I write this, I realise how silly it is - any form of radiation (neutrinos only really) that could pass through an entire planet, would also presumably pass straight through our CCD. So apart from that I have no idea. I'm certain it's something fairly mundane, but interesting nonetheless! Any thoughts?
  12. Hi all, the weather wasn't promising but I thought I would stay under the rain and take the chance. At sunrise, I started shooting without any filter (humidity and clouds were enough as filters) and I'm so happy I was able to capture Venus passing in front of the sun :D Click to enlarge:
  13. Venus 19/02/2017 18:46 (61.490 million km) GSO 0.20 m Sky-Watcher NEQ-5 Pro SynScan mount QHY5L-IIC + IR cut filter GSO barlow lens 2.5x (APO) f: 2500 mm f/12.5 Matteo Vacca Milis, Italy http://vaccamatteo.weebly.com/ https://www.astrobin.com/users/matteovacca/
  14. Here is some video I shot of the Venus & Mercury conjunction on the same evening I took the image. Watch out for the geese! Regards, Reggie
  15. From the album: Lunar and Planetary Images

    Venus 24.03.2017 imaged using Skywatcher Equinox 80 and QHY5L-II monochrome planetary camera

    © vicky050373

  16. From the album: Canon 200mm f/2.8L

    Three planets visible in the western sky, after sunset. Left is Jupiter, top is Mercury, Venus below. EOS 450D (modded), 1/20, f/3.5, ISO 400, Canon 200m f/2.8L lens.
  17. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This collection is of my images of Venus I captured during December 2016 and February 2017 which shows the change in phases as Earth catches up to Venus in the orbit around the Sun. The pictures where cloud details are coming through were captured through a UVenus (UV) filter on the clearer atmospheric condition evenings and used as the blue channel. The rest the channels are IRPass 685nm filter as red and luminance (IrCut filter) as green. All were captured using a DMK618 through a 14" Dobsonian.
  18. Luckily had a really clear evening with no clouds on the western horizon I'll try to catch the Venus- Uranus conjunction too at the end of this month
  19. OK I admit, I'm click bating just a little with that title But on a few occasions recently when I've been observing Venus I've noticed a light feature towards the north pole of the planet. Obviously it's not ice! (Venus is roasting hot and you'd never see the surface through the clouds anyway) But it does look like a white cap perhaps with a darker band below. I was wondering if anyone else had ever seen this? I'm thinking 3 possible explanations (You'll note lunacy is not among them, though clearly it can't be entirely discounted ) (1) Some sort of polar cloud vortex ? (2) The atmospheric dispersion creates a slight blue fringe at that end of Venus and that somehow leads to the illusion of a bright spot ? (3) A combination of air ripples (seeing) and some sort of psychological predisposition to "expect" a feature there. Perhaps rather like the Ashen light which may be a predisposition based on our experience of earthshine on the Moon (though it may be a real physical phenomenon too - the jury's still out as far as I know) ? I had a go at photographing it with a DSLR (I'm not an expert astrophotographer!) and it's certainly not as clear in the photo as it appeared in the eyepiece but perhaps there's a hint of it - though not much of one! As an interesting aside, I came across this 1968 paper that does appear to suggest the presence of physical ice on venus - Just shows how far we've come in our understanding of Venus since then! http://science.sciencemag.org/content/159/3819/1097
  20. Hi all, before going comet hunting tonight I went and found a nice vantage point to observe tonights conjunction of Venus and Mercury. I believe I read they were around 1degree separated. They look great hanging low in the dusk sky and Mars was also visible higher up and more southerly. I took quite a few images but this 4sec ISO100 shot was my favourite. IMG_5654.cr2.tif https://www.flickr.com/photos/116958085@N07/16246201211/
  21. A shot of Venus taken from Regents Park, London. At the moment Venus is remaining in the night sky until quite late at night which is unusual for a planet so close to the Sun. In this shot Venus is 60% illuminated.
  22. 10" Dob and a Samsung NX2000. ISO 100, 0.3sec.
  23. Hi All, I had a go at imaging Venus last night. I took an AVI and Registaxed it just now. Is that banding I can see, running across from 2 o'clock to 7 o'clock? And yes, it is Venus, not Jupiter! Sorry for the small size.
  24. 3rd June 2015 Equipment: NexStar 8SE 18:16 - 19:30: Venus was approximately 30 degrees above the west western horizon. Bright and unmistakable. Through the 13mm TV it was a bright creamy white half phase with a hint of markings along the terminator extending about a third of the way toward the edge. Markings faded out toward the north and south poles. Tried imaging at F10 & F20 using a mono CCD DMK21au618 through IRPass 685nm, Neodymium and UVenus filters to combine as RGB. IR Pass and Nd were bright in both focal lengths but UVenus was very dim had to be pushed to full gain and shuttle slowed down to 1/7 f20 and 1/15th F10. Between 19:30 and approx 21:00 Saturn was only rising, about 45 degrees in the east and was moving behind a large tree in east obstructing view. Add to that that sporadic clouds were moving toward Saturn from north-west so I waited to see what will happen when Saturn rises above the tree blocking the view. Luckily the clouds cleared mostly when Saturn was in prime imaging and viewing position. 21:00-23:00: Saturn was a sight to behold. The seeing was one of, and most likely the best I have ever seen. Using 11mm TV the view was sharp, bright and detailed. 7mm just like with 11mm TV sharp and detailed. 5mm again sharp and detailed. 11mm 2.5X PM sharp and detailed. Sharpest and biggest most detailed view. 5mm 2.5X PM started to go soft but still this was at 1016X mathematically but in reality 700-800x since the 2.5X PM seems to magnify less then the 2X Barlow... Due to length of tube. Color was visible, so were clear cloud bands in the atmosphere along with the details in rings. The Cassini division was crystal clear all the way around the ring, only covered by the globe behind the planet... At times I thought I saw the Encke division at 460x (11mm TV & 2.5X PM) perhaps it was wishful thinking since imaging did not reveal it at F20 or F50, but the view was still and crisp. I spent about 90 minutes+ just staring at Saturn, couldn't pull myself away from the eyepiece. 23:00-23:30: The Moon was the last object observed and imaged. Just past full moon, the side with shadowing was crisp at all powers used from 180X - 406X. It's been a while since the moon got some attention, last time was during the two Saturn Occultations last year. I imaged using f10 and DMK21 through IR Cut... Created a 10 plate mosaic of the contrasty edge. Very cold, couldn't feel my hands by 23:30 when I packed up but was a great night of imaging and viewing. MG
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