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Found 8 results

  1. Hi All, After a 8 month break due to moving I finally had a chance to do some simple Deep Space imaging. This image is of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Megallenic Cloud (NCG2070). This is imaged using my modded Canon 40D at F10 2032mm using a Nexstar 8SE on a CGEM mount. The image consists of 12 x 5 min subs, 5 x 10 min subs and 10 x 1 min subs, all in RGB through a IR Cut filter. Currently I'm working on using the PEC feature on the CGEM, and after I've spent a few hours before trying to work out how it works... when it got to past midnight, I was ready to call it a night but decided to frame up on the Tarantula and give it a go... I thought it's not to shabby for a quickie, so I'm sharing it. As far as PEC goes, next time I get to do some astro, I should have NexRemote, PECTools and PHD to give me a average PEC training from 10 cycles... hopefully it'll improve the guiding accuracy and hence detail in my 2000mm imaging close up images. Thank for looking, Mariusz
  2. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Image of the area around the Tarantula nebula, imaged in RGB. This image consists of a few hours of 5 & 10 minute subs in RGB at ISO400. The Large Megellanic Cloud is visible in the lower right of frame where as the Tarantula is in the upper left. Image was taken with a 80mm refractor at 500mm FL.
  3. Halloween Observation Night Date: 31 October/ 01 November 2016 @ 22:30-01:00AEDT Location: Robertson Equipment: Celestron 8SE on CGEM, Televue 31mm Nagler Type-5, 17mm Ethos, 2X 2" Powermate, Astronomik UHC Filter I finally had a clear moonless night of observation, it just happened to be on Halloween night. I was looking for a new spot in the mountains where I could setup and a couple of months ago I came across a nice little oval miles away from the city and light sources so I was hanging to check it out. When we arrived, there were people having a BBQ and playing tennis with all of the court lights on, this was a bit of a bummer but I figured that they won't be forever and eventually we'll have a clear night of viewing, they left just after 22:30. Once they left and lights were off we had some nice views of 47Tuc, Tarantula Nebula area, Orion Nebula, The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC362 Globular Cluster, The Helix Nebula, an Open cluster in the south near/around Theta Carnia, Uranus and Neptune. 47Tuc: The globular cluster clearly stood out with its millions of glistening stars becoming denser toward the core. As I was observing the cluster in the 17mm Ethos, a slow moving and bright satellite flew past it. Those views are an event that makes a already great view even better. The view of 47Tuc were all awesome using both 31mm Nagler and 17mm Ethos with and without the 2X powermate. NGC362: This globular was a lot smaller and fainter than 47Tuc but still had a lot of individual stars all around it and individual stars visible within the core. Not as impressive as 47Tuc but still a nice view through the 17mm Ethos that's very easy to see with direct vision. NGC 2070: The Tarantula Nebula was a very nice view in all powers. The loops around a obviously brighter tentacular center were faintly visible, especially when observing it using the averted method. I started the viewing using the 17mm ethos through which I saw a fair bit of detail on a quite big tarantula nebula in the eyepiece. The surprising view was when I had a look at it through the 31mm T5 Nagler. The FOV was large enough and magnification low enough for being able to position the Tarantula in left lower with nebulosity amongst hundreds of stars to the right visible where a bit of the large Magellanic cloud was coming into the FOV. There was some fuzziness and nebulosity above it, I thought what a great view, this would make a great photo. The view of the tarantula system through the Nagler was amazing, I saw nebulosity, hundreds of stars and it was all easy to see. M42/43/Running Man: Orion Nebula was a bit of a disappointment. Granted that I was waiting for the Orion nebula to come above the trees and it was not very high in the sky at the time, but I am comparing it to the view I had in the past. The shape was visible, with the trapezium clearly visible with the stars being very stable and sharp points of light, so I figured that the seeing was good, so why do I not see more detail in Orion Nebula? I saw way more nebula and detail in the past. I added the UHC filter in the eyepiece and sure it faded the stars but it did not bring out more detail like it did before, actually it made the view worse! Using both the Nagler and Ethos, in both magnifications the nebulosity was not as defined and clear as in the past but definitely there. M43 was not as defined as I saw from the dam at the start of the year, back then the "comma" shape was clearly visible and even detail visible with in it, not tonight, I was struggling to see the comma shape. The Running Man was nearly visible, I actually think that at times I saw the running man shape, about as good as I remember seeing it at the beginning of the year, so seeing was (most likely) good so why am I not seeing the nebula like before? I started to investigate. First I checked to make sure that the corrector plate was not fogged over, it was not, that I removed the real cell filter in the back of the scope on the visual back thread, thinking that maybe it takes away from the view. When comparing with and without it, I saw no difference, even suspected the dew shield perhaps causing some kind of a slight blockage and compared with and with out it, no difference, finally I re-collimated the mirrors, they were slightly out, but after collimation it again made no difference. I put it down to a combination of Orion nebula being too low in the sky just above the trees and in the direction of the city. Here I'll mention that the sky did seem quite bright, I thought that maybe my eyes were dark adapted and it seemed like it but maybe not, more on this later with my experience when I was packing up for the night. I guess I have no choice than to try again and see if a darker/more transparent sky will make a difference next observing session. NGC253: The Sculptor Galaxy was relatively easy to see, whether inverted or direct vision I could see a brighter center in a squashed oval, cigar, shape. Occasionally I think I saw some darker "cracks" through the brighter core along with 3 to 5 faint stars glistening within the elongated shape. Sculptor is big in the FOV so I kept it on the 31mm Nagler, the Ethos did not make the view any better or easier to see. I could see the galaxy clearer the more I looked at it and feel like I didn't spend enough time looking at it. NCG7293: The Helix Nebula was a faint but a big ghostly smoke ring in the 31mm Nagler. It is very faint but the smokey ring can be made out using averted vision, or slowly moving the view with the keypad set to "3". I could make out the central neutron star, very small and faint but definitely there. Next time I observe this object I'll have to try looking at it through various filters instead of just bare, maybe more will be visible. Southern open star cluster: visible with eye as fuzzy patch closer to a dust cloud rather than stars but in binoculars and in the scope was visible as heaps of scattered stars, Looking at a star map it seems to be the cluster around Theta Carina. Looked like hundreds of pin point stars were spilled into the FOV. Quite a nice view, no nebulosity visible within its vicinity. Uranus: It is a pale greenish tiny disc that's discernible from the stars around it due to its color and a little disc as opposed to a point of light, I saw no moons. Neptune: Neptune was a pale tiny grey-blueish disc barely bigger then the two stars next to it. As with Uranus, I didn't spend much time on it since there's no hope of seeing any more detail. As a last object due to its late rising this time of the year, I wanted to see the rosette but it wasn't above the trees by 01:00 when we left. Still I found it in the eyepiece and identified the 7 stars located in the center making a rhomboid shape. I read online that this nebula is one where a UHC filter really makes it stand out, so I had to try it. The center stars were still behind tree tops and sad to say that with and without the UHC filter I did not spot any nebulosity. This object will have to wait a couple of months for a darker night and when it's higher in the sky. The 31mm Nagler, 17mm ethos, 2" 2X Powermate and the Astronomik 2" UHC filter is all we took... Honestly you don't need any more than this to observe using a 8" SCT. This combination covered various magnifications and limited fumbling around in the dark for eyepieces or filters allowing more time at the eyepiece. We had some great views tonight and I can't wait to be in a dark site when the seeing is even darker with less or no sky glow. Surprisingly the Astronomik UHC made the views worse on all occasions. Not like the Lumicon that gave me the wow views on the past, unfortunately the Carina Nebula was below the horizon so I couldn't test on it, the Carina is really breathtaking through the Lumicon UHC. Next time I'm going to compare the Astronomik 2" to the Lumicon 1.25" which I didn't have with me, I'm hoping that it was just the seeing otherwise I'll eBay it and get the 2" Lumicon. Another combination I want to try the 2" TVs with is through the f6.8 reducer. It seemed like there was heaps of skyglow. We made sure that we were in total darkness, no lights except purely red lights. Yes lots of objects and stars were visible, more than from home but when we were packing up when I turned on the car head lights and we were hit by white light destroying our night adaptation. After we were packed up, I turned off the head lights and I looked up and to my surprise the sight was similar to "dark adapted" eyes!!! Perhaps it was a night of bad seeing after all, which would explain the lack of nebulosity and detail within. The skyglow was obviously quite severe and it wasn't the best I've seen in a dark site, but still an awesome night of observing, leaving me with a hunger for more. Thanks for reading, clear skies, Mariusz
  4. hjw

    Tarantula Nebula

    From the album: HEQ5/SW 80ED

    The Tarantula Nebula is part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (160,000 light years away). It is the most active star nursery in our galactic neighborhood. And it is massive. If the tarantula nebula was as close as the Orion nebula, it would take up 30° in the sky. So far I considered eta Carina as my favorite DSO... I'm not sure anymore.
  5. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a RGB image of the Tarantula Nebula taken with a 8" SCT at 2000mm. 12 x 5 mins Subs 5 x 10 mins subs 10 x 1 min subs all at ISO800
  6. Greetings Astronomers, After a long time of any combination of clouds, moon shine or work, I finally had a clear moonless night to myself... Something I was not going to let pass me by, and lucky that I didn't because it's back to partially cloudy tonight. In the past I was planning to image the area around the Tarantula nebula and the large Megallanic Cloud and tonight was my chance. I was hoping for a night of RGB, HAlpha, OIII and SII but so far all I captured was 4.5 hours of 7.5min and 3 min subs at ISO400 using my modded 40D of IRCut OSC before cloudy nights resumed. I figured that I might not get a chance to capture any narrowband to mix into it so I processed what I have and thought it was worth sharing. Thanks for looking. Mariusz
  7. Took this Tarantula Nebula photo during my trip to Namibia. Photo Details: Ha - 60Min RGB - 15Min Each channel Total Exposure: 1:45 Hours. Telescope: ASA 12'' F3.6 Astrograph Mount: ASA DDM85 Camera: FLI 8300 Mono Hope you enjoy it Haim Huli
  8. Another DSO from the Southern Hemisphere. The Tarantula nebula is a part of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Given that it is 160,000 ly away (120 times further than the Orion nebula) it is massive. Wikipedia has some interesting trivia on it: if NGC2070 was as close to earth as the M42 it would take up 30° in the sky. At the same time it would be bright enough to cast shadows. Capture details: 40 frames @ 300sec (1/3 at ISO1600 and 2/3 at ISO800 over two nights) 10 darks for each setting. Clear skies! HJ
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