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Found 6 results

  1. Have been looking forward to imaging this one for the longest time! The fall weather recently sunk my Comet ISON ambitions over the last week but then the skies cleared last evening and an indian summer night rolled in with perfect seeing yes!22-300 second light exposures at ISO 800, 15 dark frames and 25 bias frames. Levels and curves in PS 5 and some final tweeking in Lightroom. Let me know what you think of the processing. Look up!
  2. The Pleiades (M45). This is a shot I've been wanting to do for a long time. Previous attempts were unsatisfactory because my 127 Mak has too much focal length for this object and looked straight through it and using a camera lens made unattractive spokes around the stars caused by the iris of the lens. With the 150mm Newtonian scope the framing is great and plenty of nebulosity can be captured. Also the spikes caused by the secondary mirror spider add to the image. Not perfect perhaps but definitely the best attempt so far. 44 x 75 second exposures at 400 ISO (55 minutes integration time). 46 x dark frames 38 x flat frames 21 x bias/offset frames (subtracted from flat frames only) Captured with APT Guided with PHD2 Processed in Nebulosity and Photoshop Equipment: Sky-Watcher Explorer-150PDS Skywatcher EQ5 Mount Orion 50mm Mini Guide Scope ZWO ASI120 MC imaging and guiding camera Canon 700D DSLR
  3. Hello everyone, It has been a while since I posted here. I was waiting for my telescope but unfortunately my friend could not bring it along from UK Anyway since that happened I decided to continue my search for a telescope and in the meanwhile I decided to get myself a nice binocular and carry on until I get hold of a good scope. Perhaps, I could continue with a bino for some time and gain experience and then if the passion doesn't die I can get a scope. Anyway, I went to a hill station where my father-in-law has a couple of flats (at a height of 6,000 feet) and so they spend every summer there. I usually go for a few nights with my wife and kids for vacation and then come back. I had noticed in previous years that the sky is a delight in the balcony of that flat if clear. However, in those days I looked up at the stars and well that was that. So this year I wasn't able to wait to go there and observe it rather than seeing it like before. It mostly rained however I had two clear nights to myself and I cant tell you how lucky I was in those two nights. I enjoyed myself a lot and learnt and also thought quite a lot. I also have a couple of questions from my first night that I would like to ask in order to ascertain my understanding. Anyway, during the first night I did not have the binocular that my father-in-law has as I had forgotten about it. So I just went there and saw things and tried to make sense out of them. I knew it was a pre-night to the Perseid peak but I had no idea that I will see the shower with my naked eye and that it would be that much. I saw the shower with my boy in my lap who would point out at every flash with excitement. However, there are my questions: 1. I saw the shower where different (shooting stars) kept coming. they were like little balls of fire having a head a trail of light following them. But then I also saw something else during the same time and it happened more than the shower. I saw little flashes of light in the sky. One after the other and there were about a dozen of them coming from the same part of the sky more or less. Those were like little tiny dots of lights igniting at a spot and then going out in a second or less. However, they did not have any trail or streak in the sky they were like little spots that would shine in a spot and then go out. what were those ??? 2. I also spotted a satellite that was a very bright and moving very fast. However, some website suggested that it was the ISS. How does one differentiate between a satellite and the ISS ? How to know what you are beholding ??? It was during the next night that I remembered the binoculars. When I got them from him those were a 12x25 not that good but not bad either. So I gazed at the moon and enjoyed its majestic beauty. Seeing the moon not as a disk and as a spherical object with your own eyes have n effect on you ... it was just lovely. Then I also spotted the Cassiopeia and observed it for some time. And then in the end the last thing was the seven sisters in the Pleiades and that was mesmerising. the distinctive question mark in the sky that made me think and contemplate on many things including, on a lighter note, the fact that I observed the sky and had questions in my mind but the sky responded with a question mark telling me that there is more that there are things even they don't know of I shall be writing an article about it soon. cheers, Sidd
  4. a play last night with Comet Lovejoy with a Canon 5D3 and 70-200mm f/2.8 lens while I was there I couldn't resist a pop at M45, the Seven Sisters
  5. Here's a single image of M45 from early this morning, plus a labelled version. Pleiades Cluster [part of] by 1CM69, on Flickr Pleiades Cluster [part of] Labelled by 1CM69, on Flickr Taken at prime focus on my Celestron CPC925 using a f/6.3 reducer with my Olympus E-510. Due to the 2x crop factor of my camera, the resulting focal length is equiv to 2960mm at full frame 35mm, hence my inability to capture the whole cluster in a single frame because of decreased FOV. Addition of star spikes in Photoshop.
  6. Still not entirely happy with this one - I ran out of time to get a set of longer exposures during the short period I had with Pleiades high enough above the Northern horizon ( 30 deg peak altitude from my location ) and since then the weather and moon have conspired against me! Description: Pleides in the Taurus Constellation ( Messier 45 ) by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ) Pleides ( aka The Seven Sisters ) is visible to the naked eye low in the northen skies in the early summer of the Southern Hemisphere. It is bright open cluster of hundreds of blue stars in clouds of nebulosity that are relatively close to earth at around 430 light years distance. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Messier 45 - RA 3h 48m, Dec -24deg 10'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. Combination of 80 images from 4 sec @ ISO100 through to 40 sec @ ISO 800. Pixinsight & Photoshop 17 October 2015
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