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Found 57 results

  1. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This exposure of the Orion Nebula region is really just a quick and lazy session since I didn't want to waste a clear night by doing nothing and the scope was already setup and focused so I wouldn't be spending much time on setup. I also didn't have a plan for imaging another object it seemed like a good idea being a bright and easy object to image. I already imaged this object in the past, but by comparing the setup, procedure and improved tracking accuracy of the past together with the now cooled 40D, I know that the result would have been an improvement if I would have dedicated the necessary exposure time, through the necessary NB filters. This image all consists of RGB/OSC, IRCut filtered, 31x15s, 32x30s, 16x60s, 10x90s, 11x120s ISO1600 subs.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  2. Hello astronomers, This exposure of the Orion Nebula region is really just a quick and lazy session since I didn't want to waste a clear night by doing nothing and the scope was already setup and focused so I wouldn't be spending much time on setup. I also didn't have a plan for imaging another object it seemed like a good idea being a bright and easy object to image. I already imaged this object in the past, but by comparing the setup, procedure and improved tracking accuracy of the past together with the now cooled 40D, I know that the result would have been an improvement if I would have dedicated the necessary exposure time, through the necessary NB filters. This image consists of all RGB or OSC (through the IRCut filter) 31x15s, 32x30s, 16x60s, 10x90s, 11x120s ISO1600 subs. I am not prepared to spend subsequent nights capturing narrowband subs on "Orion's Sword", at least not this year... perhaps next time M42 is in the sky and only if I reach near freezing temperature cooling on my sensor. Clear skies, MG
  3. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Image of the great Orion Nebula, M42 or NGC 1976, taken in natural color through my 8" SCT at a focal length of 2032mm using an astro modded and (the recently) cooled Canon 40D DSLR. Total exposure time was just 1 hour 21 minutes and 45 seconds, image consists of 15 x 15sec, 12 x 30, 60, 120 and 180 second subs at ISO1600.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  4. Hello Astronomers, Image of the great Orion Nebula, M42 or NGC 1976, taken in natural color through my 8" SCT at a focal length of 2032mm using an astro modded and (the recently) cooled Canon 40D DSLR. Total exposure time was just 1 hour 21 minutes and 45 seconds, image consists of 15 x 15sec, 12 x 30, 60, 120 and 180 second subs at ISO1600. Clear Skies, MG
  5. WOW! Had a great view! Used my Pocket Sky Atlas to plan the night, then I just shot right out there! Saw the 7 Sisters (Pleiades), then hopped to the Orion Nebula! Used my ES 18 mm to find it then switched to the Morpheus 12.5 mm and could actually see wispy parts of the Nebula! ( I guess that’s what it was! LoL!) Really amazing! Called the wife out to take a look. Next I want to find Andromeda! Greg
  6. Hi, i captured orion nebula with nikon d5600 and nikon 18-140mm lens,the images it took was shaky and look like small star trails but i kept only at minimum shutter speed...what is wrong with the image? i hv attached sample image..pls help
  7. ...It's enought to celebrate, heck it's enough to get drunk I say...! Yesterday it's was clear and so I had to make the yearly M42 image, it's already late for it as it's getting behind the roofs for me but even so i managed to get 7x10 min. subs and another 10x30 secs for the core, cooked it all an there you go, a clean and detailled Orion nebula The image is resized to 50% resolution but still there's plenty of details to take in, check out the trapezium fully resolved, in the full resolution image there's even E and a hint of the F component there at only 800 mm f/l...cool https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/ Hope you enjoy, Cheers, P.S: Thanks to Jerry Lodriguss for the tutorial in PS, I allways get at it when processing images of M42...as I forget how to do it every time
  8. Hi All, I was lucky enough to have one clear night in between cloudy and rainy weather. It happened to be a moonless night, so between 9pm and just past midnight I grabbed the final subs I needed to finish the NGC1365 barred spiral image (still to be finished-processed) and after those subs were done I wanted to start to image the whole of Orions Sword using my 80mm f6.25 refractor. I captured an hour of 210 second subs, an hour of 180 second subs, 30 mins of 30 second subs and 15 minutes of 15 second subs all on the full spectrum modded Canon 40D at ISO800. For the final processing I selected only the best subs, and thankfully most were near perfect (for my average standards), resulting in me only throwing away a total of 15 minutes of data. The next night I get a another imaging session at Orions Sword (hopefully still when the moon is not lighting things up), I'll grab a stack of Halpha and OIII data to add to this project. I'm curious what the narrowband added to this RGB will result in. Clear skies, MG
  9. From the album: The-MathMog's Images

    One of my only semi-successful sessions with imaging. This whole thing is still very new to me, and the learning curve seems very steep, which makes it interesting and rewarding though. Celestron Nexstar 130 SLT Baader Barlow (Only the lens was used, which was screwed onto the prime focus adapter. Nikon d5200 2x 30 second subs (not sure how I pulled those off) 6400 iso 1x 8 second sub
  10. Nadine2704

    Orion Nebula

    From the album: Astrophotography

    Taken with my iOptron Skytracker and Canon 70d with 300mm lens.
  11. From the album: Stars and Constellations

    Taken using Canon 100D on Skywatcher Star Adventurer - 55mm lens - single 4 minute exposure at ISO 800 You can clearly see M42 The Orion Nebula within "the sword", and there is a hint of The Flame Nebula and The Horsehead Nebula around the bottom left star of "the belt" Taken during a trip out to The Dales on Thursday night at a nice dark site between Kettlewell and Hawes

    © Vicky050373

  12. Been really busy with university applications lately, but after watching Star Gazing Live last night I felt inspired to brush the dust off the scope and get imaging. Didn't get nearly as much exposure as I'd hoped due to mechanical problems, but was very happy with my polar alignment. Almost getting the hang of this stuff! Anyway here it is, my first go at M42, in JPEG form, with some very quick and basic post processing in DSS. Not happy with the clarity of the image, it appears hazy to me? And the core appears kinda burnt out. All feedback appreciated(: Scope: Skywatcher 200P Camera: Sony Alpha A-57 25 lights at ISO 1600 and 30s each. 12mins 30secs exposure time. 28 darks No flats or bias
  13. Hello all, last I night I give a try at Orion Nebula when the clouds were not in the way I live in a fairly light polluted city centre (with a thick orange sky glow) so I decided to buy a Baader UHC-S filter to see if it would help, so this is my first light with the UHC-S and I was chuffed! In my opinion, it's worth every cent! Normally, even when taking a lot of subs, darks and flats I end up with weird gradients, heavy noise, lack of contrast and other annoying artifacts that not even post processing can get rid of, but last night the UHC-S blessed me and with only a bunch of quick subs and darks I've finally got some decent contrast, decent colours and detail ! Again, not an Hubble grade picture and very far from those crazy 100 hours Ha-RGB stacks, but it's my first half-decent DSO image so I'm happy with it (it must have been my lucky night yesterday, as I was lucky also with Jupiter). I think it needs some more post processing as there is a bit more signal and nebulosity to squeeze out. Any comment or advise appreciated! Celestron 80ED (F/7.5) Motorised EQ5 (Rough polar alignment) 2" UHC-S Filter Nikon D7000 20 subs, 20 seconds each, ISO 1600 5 Darks Churned by DSS Squeezed by Adobe Lightroom Thanks for watching!
  14. 6th December 2015 Equipment: NexStar 8SE Time: 01:00 - 03:45 During the imaging of Barnard33 through the OIII filter using the 80mm refractor, I setup the 8SE on the single arm alt-az mount for observing. Orion Nebula looked great and bright through just the eyepiece but when using the UHC filter it was detailed and awesome. The shape of the nebula was clearly visible, the fishes mouth and the mustache shaped extends were very distinctly brighter than the reminder of the nebula. There was a lot of the nebulosity visible starting to take on the shape of the "flame" as photographed except it was more rounded. The four stars in the trapezium were bright and distinct. The second object I was looking for to observe was the globular cluster 47Toucana. When I located, it was not in the database of the NexStar 8SE hand controller (atleast not as 47Toucana), it looked dimmer that I was expecting. I spend a bit of time looking at the globular through both the 40mm eye piece and the 11mm Nagler... Both showed a dim image of the globular. Through the 11mm I did see some granulation and irregularly speckled stars extending out from the core. I did a "identify object" scan on the hand controller and it come up as NGC362 and the next nearest object was NGC265 in the list. Looking up the objects NGC362 is magnitude 8 and 47Toucana NGC104 is magnitude 5.8. Both of these objects should be a lot brighter in the eyepiece than the object I was observing and struggling, just barely resolving stars around the globular. That point brings me to the next nearest object, NGC265. In StarWalk it's shown to be magnitude 12.5 and when squinting and de focussing my vision on the shown picture it definitely resembles the shape, brighter/denser core and speckled stars at the outer edges. It also makes a lot more sense for it to be so dim in the FOV when looking at it through a telescope with a maximum resolving power of magnitude 14.5. So I think I was actually looking at NGC265, and not 47Tucana or NGC362. The reason why the catalog on the NS8 hand controller shown NGC362 as a first choice if because the object was manually found after locating the constellation Toucana, the three objects are close together, the NS8 has very little objects in this part of the sky in the database and the star alignment might have been a few degrees off. The reason I didn't look up the data and thought the NGC362 was the Globular cluster 47Toucana is because I didn't want to turn on the iPhone or the iPad and destroy my night adapted vision...REMINDER: GET RED FILM FOR IPHONE AND IPAD. 47Toucana needs to be looked for and observed another night.... So does NGC362 for that matter and compare to NGC265 to confirm the above theory. The next object I wanted to find and observe for the first time was the Horsehead nebula. Reading others observation about the Horsehead, some claim to have spotted it in 4" refractors from dark skies, I though that I might have a chance from my semi dark location. I located Alnitak and looked for any hint of the Horsehead or Flame nebulae with no luck, than I spend a few minutes looking for the nebulae using UHC and OIII filters with no luck. I rushed a bit using the UHC and OIII since it's commonly documented that a h-beta filter is the best filter to spot it. Through the h-beta filter Alnitak was still quite bright but the background was a lot darker, but I still couldn't spot either the Flame or the Horsehead nebulae. I've spend a fair bit of time looking for it through both the 40mm and 11mm eyepieces but at the end before I gave up I still couldn't spot any of them. When I brought my head up and looked at the sky toward Orion's Belt, it was quite obvious that my sight was quite dark adapted since the sky was glowing, it was almost milky bright... I put not seeing the Horsehead nebula down to the sky glow being much too bright for it to come through. The hunt will need to continue another night. The last object I observed was The Carina Nebula. As previously the Carina nebula is a sight to behold, it is definitely my favorite nebula to observe along with the Orion Nebula. It looks stunning through the UHC filter and 11mm eyepiece, the detail in the brightest arm was visible clearly, although not as defined as the last time I looked at it, but close. Through the 40mm eyepiece and the f6.3 focal reducer, there was a lot of the nebula visible in the FOV. Not only the brightest arm, but also the other two features that starts to make the "storm trooper face" shape. This is another object that I always spend a considerable time observing through various magnifications. Both the Orion and Carina nebulae have a slight blue-gray color look to them through the UHC filter which gives it a almost painted appearance. Tonight I was not going to get stopped by dew like last time I was observing so I ran a RCA loom from the CGEM and through a gender changer connected the 8SE dew heater strap, seems to have done the trick since there was no dewing of the optics. The seeing was quite still tonight but as dark adaption revealed, the sky glow was quite bright. Toward the end of the observing session some thin cloud patches were coming and going, not interfering with the imaging. Tonight was definitely a great night of observing. MG
  15. It's been ages - well the best part of a year since I sold my trusty OSC self-guiding SBIG camera and replaced it with a Mono (via Ian King) due to my increasing light pollution... I've become a part time beta tester in the process for Canada based Apple Mac astro software developer - Microprojects, whilst trying to sort out the new STF8300M imaging camera and the 'dog' of an ST-i guide camera (it would be nice if SBIG pulled their finger out and sorted new drivers considering it's advertised as Mac compatible - so 'be warned' any Mac purchasers at the moment as the thing does not appear to like PHD either), but, we are nearly there (well I have an image at least - although I very nearly jacked the imaging game in to go back to visual), as I have spent ages 'garage' testing software whilst everyone else has been imaging and improving...... most depressing ;-( Still the odd issue with the STF locking whilst downloading an exposure and more annoyingly, on/off guiding due to 'corrupting' guide stars (ST-i) we think due to fluctuating noise levels playing havoc with the auto dark subtraction....or it could all be driver related(!), but an image at last to show you! Still a work in progress - need more exposures and some shorter ones for the core - plus brushing up my processing skill again! Not sure if I'll go for RGB colour or try a full narrowband image at some stage.... At the moment though I may just stick with Ha and try to build up a decent 'core' library to add to in the future - and resolve the last software issues.... Details: M42 Orion Nebula - Ha, 11th Nov 2012 WIP - still to get 'core' data. Only 15 x 600 sec exposures Takahashi FSQ106-ED + dedicated F/R @f/3.6 SBIG STF8300M + Baader 7nm Ha filter. Guided with SBIG ST-i via ST-80 via MicroProjects Equinox Image (beta test) 'Scopebuggied' Takahashi EM400 mount - controlled via MicroProjects Equinox Pro (all on a 17" MacBook Pro) Preprocessed (Darks and Flat frames), aligned and stacked in Nebulosity 3. Processed in Adobe Photoshop CS5 Would appear that I'm not the only one who has suffered camera, mount, computer issues.... stupid game this imaging! Thanks for looking....
  16. King of the winter night sky -Orion NebulaAs the part of our galaxy lies around 1340 light years from us and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth.Only 27 frames as the clouds were covering all sky as soon as I arrived.. Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-ProMount: AZ EQ6-GT Camera: QHY168C Filter Optolong L-PRO MAX Luminosity Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: SW 9x50 finderscope 27x300s exposure at -10°C (135min total) 2h 15min binning 1x1 20xdarks 30xbias 20x flats
  17. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Image of the whole of Orions Sword in RGB using a 80mm f6.25 doublet refractor. I captured an hour of 210 second subs, an hour of 180 second subs, 30 mins of 30 second subs and 15 minutes of 15 second subs all on a full spectrum modded Canon 40D at ISO800. For the final processing I selected only the best subs which was about 2 hours 15 minutes of data.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  18. MarsG76

    Orions Sword

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The whole Orion's Sword in RGB and 30% HOO added to the channels. This image was taken with a modded Canon 40D through a 80mm F6.25 (500mmFL) Bosma Beta RE Refractor.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  19. Finally managed to have a proper go at Orion Widefield last weekend. 45x240s (3hours) with Canon 6D and 50mm f2.8 at ISO800. No darks/bias/flats. Stacked in DSS and processed in PS. I am pretty happy with the result but now it got me thinking, how do I go from this to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Molecular_Cloud_Complex#/media/File:Orion_Head_to_Toe.jpg Is it a matter of longer acquisition, or is that CCD territory?
  20. Halloween Observation Night Date: 31 October/ 01 November 2016 @ 22:30-01:00AEDT Location: Robertson Equipment: Celestron 8SE on CGEM, Televue 31mm Nagler Type-5, 17mm Ethos, 2X 2" Powermate, Astronomik UHC Filter I finally had a clear moonless night of observation, it just happened to be on Halloween night. I was looking for a new spot in the mountains where I could setup and a couple of months ago I came across a nice little oval miles away from the city and light sources so I was hanging to check it out. When we arrived, there were people having a BBQ and playing tennis with all of the court lights on, this was a bit of a bummer but I figured that they won't be forever and eventually we'll have a clear night of viewing, they left just after 22:30. Once they left and lights were off we had some nice views of 47Tuc, Tarantula Nebula area, Orion Nebula, The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC362 Globular Cluster, The Helix Nebula, an Open cluster in the south near/around Theta Carnia, Uranus and Neptune. 47Tuc: The globular cluster clearly stood out with its millions of glistening stars becoming denser toward the core. As I was observing the cluster in the 17mm Ethos, a slow moving and bright satellite flew past it. Those views are an event that makes a already great view even better. The view of 47Tuc were all awesome using both 31mm Nagler and 17mm Ethos with and without the 2X powermate. NGC362: This globular was a lot smaller and fainter than 47Tuc but still had a lot of individual stars all around it and individual stars visible within the core. Not as impressive as 47Tuc but still a nice view through the 17mm Ethos that's very easy to see with direct vision. NGC 2070: The Tarantula Nebula was a very nice view in all powers. The loops around a obviously brighter tentacular center were faintly visible, especially when observing it using the averted method. I started the viewing using the 17mm ethos through which I saw a fair bit of detail on a quite big tarantula nebula in the eyepiece. The surprising view was when I had a look at it through the 31mm T5 Nagler. The FOV was large enough and magnification low enough for being able to position the Tarantula in left lower with nebulosity amongst hundreds of stars to the right visible where a bit of the large Magellanic cloud was coming into the FOV. There was some fuzziness and nebulosity above it, I thought what a great view, this would make a great photo. The view of the tarantula system through the Nagler was amazing, I saw nebulosity, hundreds of stars and it was all easy to see. M42/43/Running Man: Orion Nebula was a bit of a disappointment. Granted that I was waiting for the Orion nebula to come above the trees and it was not very high in the sky at the time, but I am comparing it to the view I had in the past. The shape was visible, with the trapezium clearly visible with the stars being very stable and sharp points of light, so I figured that the seeing was good, so why do I not see more detail in Orion Nebula? I saw way more nebula and detail in the past. I added the UHC filter in the eyepiece and sure it faded the stars but it did not bring out more detail like it did before, actually it made the view worse! Using both the Nagler and Ethos, in both magnifications the nebulosity was not as defined and clear as in the past but definitely there. M43 was not as defined as I saw from the dam at the start of the year, back then the "comma" shape was clearly visible and even detail visible with in it, not tonight, I was struggling to see the comma shape. The Running Man was nearly visible, I actually think that at times I saw the running man shape, about as good as I remember seeing it at the beginning of the year, so seeing was (most likely) good so why am I not seeing the nebula like before? I started to investigate. First I checked to make sure that the corrector plate was not fogged over, it was not, that I removed the real cell filter in the back of the scope on the visual back thread, thinking that maybe it takes away from the view. When comparing with and without it, I saw no difference, even suspected the dew shield perhaps causing some kind of a slight blockage and compared with and with out it, no difference, finally I re-collimated the mirrors, they were slightly out, but after collimation it again made no difference. I put it down to a combination of Orion nebula being too low in the sky just above the trees and in the direction of the city. Here I'll mention that the sky did seem quite bright, I thought that maybe my eyes were dark adapted and it seemed like it but maybe not, more on this later with my experience when I was packing up for the night. I guess I have no choice than to try again and see if a darker/more transparent sky will make a difference next observing session. NGC253: The Sculptor Galaxy was relatively easy to see, whether inverted or direct vision I could see a brighter center in a squashed oval, cigar, shape. Occasionally I think I saw some darker "cracks" through the brighter core along with 3 to 5 faint stars glistening within the elongated shape. Sculptor is big in the FOV so I kept it on the 31mm Nagler, the Ethos did not make the view any better or easier to see. I could see the galaxy clearer the more I looked at it and feel like I didn't spend enough time looking at it. NCG7293: The Helix Nebula was a faint but a big ghostly smoke ring in the 31mm Nagler. It is very faint but the smokey ring can be made out using averted vision, or slowly moving the view with the keypad set to "3". I could make out the central neutron star, very small and faint but definitely there. Next time I observe this object I'll have to try looking at it through various filters instead of just bare, maybe more will be visible. Southern open star cluster: visible with eye as fuzzy patch closer to a dust cloud rather than stars but in binoculars and in the scope was visible as heaps of scattered stars, Looking at a star map it seems to be the cluster around Theta Carina. Looked like hundreds of pin point stars were spilled into the FOV. Quite a nice view, no nebulosity visible within its vicinity. Uranus: It is a pale greenish tiny disc that's discernible from the stars around it due to its color and a little disc as opposed to a point of light, I saw no moons. Neptune: Neptune was a pale tiny grey-blueish disc barely bigger then the two stars next to it. As with Uranus, I didn't spend much time on it since there's no hope of seeing any more detail. As a last object due to its late rising this time of the year, I wanted to see the rosette but it wasn't above the trees by 01:00 when we left. Still I found it in the eyepiece and identified the 7 stars located in the center making a rhomboid shape. I read online that this nebula is one where a UHC filter really makes it stand out, so I had to try it. The center stars were still behind tree tops and sad to say that with and without the UHC filter I did not spot any nebulosity. This object will have to wait a couple of months for a darker night and when it's higher in the sky. The 31mm Nagler, 17mm ethos, 2" 2X Powermate and the Astronomik 2" UHC filter is all we took... Honestly you don't need any more than this to observe using a 8" SCT. This combination covered various magnifications and limited fumbling around in the dark for eyepieces or filters allowing more time at the eyepiece. We had some great views tonight and I can't wait to be in a dark site when the seeing is even darker with less or no sky glow. Surprisingly the Astronomik UHC made the views worse on all occasions. Not like the Lumicon that gave me the wow views on the past, unfortunately the Carina Nebula was below the horizon so I couldn't test on it, the Carina is really breathtaking through the Lumicon UHC. Next time I'm going to compare the Astronomik 2" to the Lumicon 1.25" which I didn't have with me, I'm hoping that it was just the seeing otherwise I'll eBay it and get the 2" Lumicon. Another combination I want to try the 2" TVs with is through the f6.8 reducer. It seemed like there was heaps of skyglow. We made sure that we were in total darkness, no lights except purely red lights. Yes lots of objects and stars were visible, more than from home but when we were packing up when I turned on the car head lights and we were hit by white light destroying our night adaptation. After we were packed up, I turned off the head lights and I looked up and to my surprise the sight was similar to "dark adapted" eyes!!! Perhaps it was a night of bad seeing after all, which would explain the lack of nebulosity and detail within. The skyglow was obviously quite severe and it wasn't the best I've seen in a dark site, but still an awesome night of observing, leaving me with a hunger for more. Thanks for reading, clear skies, Mariusz
  21. First reasonably clear night in London for weeks so I thought I'd have another go at capturing M42. I think this is better than previous attempts but there's plenty of room for improvement...
  22. It rained yesterday, but it was mostly clear after midnight. I just used my binos after 12:30 and saw the Pleiades, all of Orion including M42, Auriga and some open clusters just to the south and east of it. Today was the first day I could see Orion, because I set up in my backyard and my row of townhomes blocks a lot the sky from northeast to southeast. M42 looked great in my 15 x 70 binos, although not as good as in my telescopes. I can make out the nebulosity very easily and could see 3 fairly bright stars in the nebula.
  23. Hi All, Before setting up on to a new target, I managed to spend a couple of nights on exposing the Orions Sword through a HAlpha and OIII 7.5nm filters to add to the pure RGB image I posted earlier. I got 10 x 900s for each Halpha and OIII across two nights. I mixed 30% of Halpha from Red into the Red RGB channel, green and blue from OIII channels into green and blue channels in the RGB corresponding channel. So here I'm sharing the final result... I've moved on to imaging Barnard 33 so I think this will be my final version of the Orion nebula for a while. Another thing is that the contrast and color levels look very different on my PC screen when comparing to the iPad display so I've posted both versions, the darker version is optimized for my iPad screen where the less contrasty version looks better on my PC LCD. For my future postings here is a small survey... which one looks better on your screen/display? Thanks for looking, MG
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