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Found 49 results

  1. Yet another M42...

    Not that anyone could get fed up with this object... Date: 01 January 2018 Equipment: SXV-H9, Vixen 114mm f5.3 ED refractor, guiding with Lodestar X2/PHD Subframes: 30 x 300s, 100s & 20s H-alpha, 20 x 20s & 100s RGB 2x2 binned, 20 flats for each channel, no darks (hot pixel removal in Astroart instead). Images were acquired and pre-processed (aligned, stacked, denoised) in AstroArt4, then composited in Paint Shop Pro7. The Orion Nebula presents quite a challenge to depict because of the wide brightness range of its key features. Many early CCD images of this object as shown on the web "burn out" the "trapezium" region of the four central stars in attempting to show the outlying nebulosity. I use the "layers" function in PaintShop Pro, stacking the longest exposures on top of shorter ones, and then carefully use the "eraser" tool to remove overexposed areas, leaving the underlying correctly exposed regions to show through. This has to be done with care to avoid introducing obvious processing artefacts. Whilst the latest image processing programs such as Pixinsight have "dynamic range adjustment" features that can automatically produce an even distribution of brightness, some of the resultant images can seem rather strange to my eyes. Programmes like that are way beyond both my budget and my understanding! LRGB combination (using the H-alpha stack as the luminance channel) went well in both Astroart and PaintShop Pro. The PSP version was a lot greener than the Astroart one (though you can “weight” colours to compensate for CCD sensitivity at different wavelengths), but I preferred the PSP output as it hinted at the greenish hue of the nebula that is so clearly discernible though the eyepiece. All of the brighter features seen in the above image show clearly through my VC200L and a 25mm eyepiece. The central trapezium of four stars shines brilliantly against a bright silvery background, which fades into the convoluted greenish wings of the surrounding nebula. The dark channel between the main portion of the nebula and the upper candle-flame is clearly seen. I strove to retain all of these key features in the image above, as well as highlight the extended nebulosity that the eye cannot see. Any comments, criticisms or suggestions gratefully received...
  2. One night after complaining on the forums that observing opportunities are so few and far between in the UK during winter and I look up to see clear skies and a blindingly bright moon. My preferred targets are DSOs but having recently bought a Baader Neutral Density Moon filter (0.9) I thought it might be a great time to try it out. I'd also recently bought that thingy that lets you attach your phone to the eyepiece and so I took the picture below and I'm fairly pleased with the result. I thought that the blue fringe of doom was exclusively a refractor thing which is why I was surprised to see the blue fringe in the picture. I have owned my Skyliner 200p Dobsonian for around ten years and so it might surprise you to know that I have never managed to see the Orion Nebula through my telescope, or any other telescope for that matter; so last night, with the moon 96% of full I thought I'd give it a try. Less than ideal conditions you might say but I have to tell you, it was still spectacular! I was able to see a surprising amount of detail and I also worked out (at long last) which time of year and what time of night I can see the whole of Orion from my back garden (mid to late January onwards at around 11pm) rather than the utterly light polluted front garden. I cannot wait for a moonless (clear) night so I can sketch the nebula! I did also discover that my collimation efforts were less than stellar (pun intended) and so, back to the drawing board. Overall it was a fantastic night's observing! I was able to spend a good while not just looking at the nebula but observing it and teasing out as much detail as I could using the usual old tricks. The night was clear but all my back garden observing is done over the neighbours' houses, so heat shimmer and therefore focus was an issue. I actually used my Baader Neodymium filter to reduce the effects of light pollution and increase contrast which it did very well. I'm seriously itching for a clear moonless night! By the way if anyone can recommend a good observing chair my back would be very grateful
  3. M42 Orion Nebula

    King of the winter night sky -Orion NebulaAs the part of our galaxy lies around 1340 light years from us and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth.Only 27 frames as the clouds were covering all sky as soon as I arrived.. Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-ProMount: AZ EQ6-GT Camera: QHY168C Filter Optolong L-PRO MAX Luminosity Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: SW 9x50 finderscope 27x300s exposure at -10°C (135min total) 2h 15min binning 1x1 20xdarks 30xbias 20x flats
  4. Taken Saturday night, 25/26 Nov 17. 80 subs of 0.1.s, 1s, 10s x 20 each. 60s and 180s x 10 each. Flats/bias/darks x 10 each. Atik 4120EX OSC camera Celestron C11 with Hyperstar Mesu 200 mount.
  5. M42 unguided Ha

    So as this season's first image, I have started on the Orion nebula. I had guiding issues, but with my newly polar aligned observatory I could do 150sec exposures without issues. 1h 37min total. 6x 10 sec 18x 30sec 17x 60sec 28x 150sec I think it's a good start to continue on. I have darks and biases for it, but they where taken after I processed. I'll save them for when I get more data. Let me know what you think. It's been a long summer, so had to learn 'everything' again. At lest I have polaralignment within 5 arcsec in both axies this year
  6. Had a night out in a feild with a mate last night, we were aiming for a bit of polar alignment / guiding practice. It all went pear shaped very quickly ... He forgot the top half of his mount so we both played with my AVX. Pole master polar alignment went well, as did PHD2 with an Altair gpcam finder guider on a Zenithstar 71. Put the Nikon D5300 on and focused roughly with a Bahtinov, then started BYN (back yard Nikon) Would it connect ? No chance ! Tried various reboots etc. No joy. So We tried Steve's camera... Canon ! But we could swap T adaptor , yay ! But no, his was a T to M48 to screw straight on his Star 71. So I bunged my Nikon back on and pressed the shutter manually for about 20 30 second exposures @ 400 iso. All good fun though and we had a great laugh. Edit : tried connecting Nikon this morning and it worked straight away ... I laughed , kind of hysterically 😂
  7. M42 - LRGB from DSW

    M42 took quite a bit of processing time. That is a bright core even with very short exposures. Then how much of the fainter stuff do you try to pull out? There might be more to be found in the data, but I am trying to keep things looking 'natural'. Then again, what is 'natural'? I'd be interested to hear what people think. Data capture was completed in February 2017. It consists: Luminance: 15x15" bin 1x1 Luminance: 16x60" bin 1x1 Luminance: 16x600" bin 1x1 Red: 8x15" bin 1x1 Red: 8x60" bin 1x1 Red: 16x600" bin 1x1 Green: 8x15" bin 1x1 Green: 8x60" bin 1x1 Green: 16x600" bin 1x1 Blue: 8x15" bin 1x1 Blue 8x60" bin 1x1 Blue: 32x600" bin 1x1 TOTAL = 14.2 hours Astrodon filters from the Tak 106/QSI 683 rig at DSW.
  8. The Great Orion Nebula

    Observing Information DSO - M42/M43 Date - 15/03/17 Time - 20:15 Lunar Phase - 89% Seeing - Good Equipment - Celestron Nexstar 6SE Eyepieces - ES 24mm 68 degree Additional info - Wow is all I can say with this one before last night my favourite Nebula was the eagle Nebula now I'm not so sure. First thing that struck me when I started observing was the beautiful pattern of stars the 4 close together in the middle with the bottom right one being the brightest and the 3 star at the bottom. The longer I observed the more detail jumped out at me the swirl of gas almost like an arc was simply breath taking not since I first observed M13 my first ever DSO have I been so overwhelmed. M43 was a bit strange though I could make out the star but no gas cloud or shape to it it's at mag 7 so shouldn't have been to much of a problem maybe next time I will use one of my Nebula filters but my O lll stayed in its case as I didn't feel the need. I also spent some time observing Jupiter, I could make out 4 of the moons 2 of which were very close in proximity these turned out to be Euopa and Lo. The other 2 being Ganymede and Callisto in that order. I could also make out the 2 main bands of Jupiter the north and south equatorial belts but no luck with the Great Red Spot still beautiful to observe though here's an image of stellarium. The moon unfortunately was up a bit late but got about 15 mins observation time beautiful crisp craters and lovely shadows again along the terminator. So a very good session and one of my favourite sketches to date 😊 Clear skies ✨💫🌙☄️ Richard
  9. The Great Orion Nebula 14-02-2017

    From the album The-MathMog's Images

    One of my only semi-successful sessions with imaging. This whole thing is still very new to me, and the learning curve seems very steep, which makes it interesting and rewarding though. Celestron Nexstar 130 SLT Baader Barlow (Only the lens was used, which was screwed onto the prime focus adapter. Nikon d5200 2x 30 second subs (not sure how I pulled those off) 6400 iso 1x 8 second sub
  10. 0hmmm. can't seem to get tight focus on stars; finally got hold of a bhatinov mask and took shot (see below). unless i'm missing something, this looks ok yet when i take mask off stars look like small indescript blobs. star used was rigel - panned over to orion nebula and well kind of meh sadly. i tethered camera to laptop, zoomed right in 10x and still no better. used canon eos utility. should i upgrade to eos backyard or what else can i try? checked my collimation too and looks grand under high magnification. help!!
  11. Finally managed to have a proper go at Orion Widefield last weekend. 45x240s (3hours) with Canon 6D and 50mm f2.8 at ISO800. No darks/bias/flats. Stacked in DSS and processed in PS. I am pretty happy with the result but now it got me thinking, how do I go from this to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Molecular_Cloud_Complex#/media/File:Orion_Head_to_Toe.jpg Is it a matter of longer acquisition, or is that CCD territory?
  12. Orion Nebula

    From the album Astrophotography

    Taken with my iOptron Skytracker and Canon 70d with 300mm lens.
  13. Halloween Observation Night Date: 31 October/ 01 November 2016 @ 22:30-01:00AEDT Location: Robertson Equipment: Celestron 8SE on CGEM, Televue 31mm Nagler Type-5, 17mm Ethos, 2X 2" Powermate, Astronomik UHC Filter I finally had a clear moonless night of observation, it just happened to be on Halloween night. I was looking for a new spot in the mountains where I could setup and a couple of months ago I came across a nice little oval miles away from the city and light sources so I was hanging to check it out. When we arrived, there were people having a BBQ and playing tennis with all of the court lights on, this was a bit of a bummer but I figured that they won't be forever and eventually we'll have a clear night of viewing, they left just after 22:30. Once they left and lights were off we had some nice views of 47Tuc, Tarantula Nebula area, Orion Nebula, The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC362 Globular Cluster, The Helix Nebula, an Open cluster in the south near/around Theta Carnia, Uranus and Neptune. 47Tuc: The globular cluster clearly stood out with its millions of glistening stars becoming denser toward the core. As I was observing the cluster in the 17mm Ethos, a slow moving and bright satellite flew past it. Those views are an event that makes a already great view even better. The view of 47Tuc were all awesome using both 31mm Nagler and 17mm Ethos with and without the 2X powermate. NGC362: This globular was a lot smaller and fainter than 47Tuc but still had a lot of individual stars all around it and individual stars visible within the core. Not as impressive as 47Tuc but still a nice view through the 17mm Ethos that's very easy to see with direct vision. NGC 2070: The Tarantula Nebula was a very nice view in all powers. The loops around a obviously brighter tentacular center were faintly visible, especially when observing it using the averted method. I started the viewing using the 17mm ethos through which I saw a fair bit of detail on a quite big tarantula nebula in the eyepiece. The surprising view was when I had a look at it through the 31mm T5 Nagler. The FOV was large enough and magnification low enough for being able to position the Tarantula in left lower with nebulosity amongst hundreds of stars to the right visible where a bit of the large Magellanic cloud was coming into the FOV. There was some fuzziness and nebulosity above it, I thought what a great view, this would make a great photo. The view of the tarantula system through the Nagler was amazing, I saw nebulosity, hundreds of stars and it was all easy to see. M42/43/Running Man: Orion Nebula was a bit of a disappointment. Granted that I was waiting for the Orion nebula to come above the trees and it was not very high in the sky at the time, but I am comparing it to the view I had in the past. The shape was visible, with the trapezium clearly visible with the stars being very stable and sharp points of light, so I figured that the seeing was good, so why do I not see more detail in Orion Nebula? I saw way more nebula and detail in the past. I added the UHC filter in the eyepiece and sure it faded the stars but it did not bring out more detail like it did before, actually it made the view worse! Using both the Nagler and Ethos, in both magnifications the nebulosity was not as defined and clear as in the past but definitely there. M43 was not as defined as I saw from the dam at the start of the year, back then the "comma" shape was clearly visible and even detail visible with in it, not tonight, I was struggling to see the comma shape. The Running Man was nearly visible, I actually think that at times I saw the running man shape, about as good as I remember seeing it at the beginning of the year, so seeing was (most likely) good so why am I not seeing the nebula like before? I started to investigate. First I checked to make sure that the corrector plate was not fogged over, it was not, that I removed the real cell filter in the back of the scope on the visual back thread, thinking that maybe it takes away from the view. When comparing with and without it, I saw no difference, even suspected the dew shield perhaps causing some kind of a slight blockage and compared with and with out it, no difference, finally I re-collimated the mirrors, they were slightly out, but after collimation it again made no difference. I put it down to a combination of Orion nebula being too low in the sky just above the trees and in the direction of the city. Here I'll mention that the sky did seem quite bright, I thought that maybe my eyes were dark adapted and it seemed like it but maybe not, more on this later with my experience when I was packing up for the night. I guess I have no choice than to try again and see if a darker/more transparent sky will make a difference next observing session. NGC253: The Sculptor Galaxy was relatively easy to see, whether inverted or direct vision I could see a brighter center in a squashed oval, cigar, shape. Occasionally I think I saw some darker "cracks" through the brighter core along with 3 to 5 faint stars glistening within the elongated shape. Sculptor is big in the FOV so I kept it on the 31mm Nagler, the Ethos did not make the view any better or easier to see. I could see the galaxy clearer the more I looked at it and feel like I didn't spend enough time looking at it. NCG7293: The Helix Nebula was a faint but a big ghostly smoke ring in the 31mm Nagler. It is very faint but the smokey ring can be made out using averted vision, or slowly moving the view with the keypad set to "3". I could make out the central neutron star, very small and faint but definitely there. Next time I observe this object I'll have to try looking at it through various filters instead of just bare, maybe more will be visible. Southern open star cluster: visible with eye as fuzzy patch closer to a dust cloud rather than stars but in binoculars and in the scope was visible as heaps of scattered stars, Looking at a star map it seems to be the cluster around Theta Carina. Looked like hundreds of pin point stars were spilled into the FOV. Quite a nice view, no nebulosity visible within its vicinity. Uranus: It is a pale greenish tiny disc that's discernible from the stars around it due to its color and a little disc as opposed to a point of light, I saw no moons. Neptune: Neptune was a pale tiny grey-blueish disc barely bigger then the two stars next to it. As with Uranus, I didn't spend much time on it since there's no hope of seeing any more detail. As a last object due to its late rising this time of the year, I wanted to see the rosette but it wasn't above the trees by 01:00 when we left. Still I found it in the eyepiece and identified the 7 stars located in the center making a rhomboid shape. I read online that this nebula is one where a UHC filter really makes it stand out, so I had to try it. The center stars were still behind tree tops and sad to say that with and without the UHC filter I did not spot any nebulosity. This object will have to wait a couple of months for a darker night and when it's higher in the sky. The 31mm Nagler, 17mm ethos, 2" 2X Powermate and the Astronomik 2" UHC filter is all we took... Honestly you don't need any more than this to observe using a 8" SCT. This combination covered various magnifications and limited fumbling around in the dark for eyepieces or filters allowing more time at the eyepiece. We had some great views tonight and I can't wait to be in a dark site when the seeing is even darker with less or no sky glow. Surprisingly the Astronomik UHC made the views worse on all occasions. Not like the Lumicon that gave me the wow views on the past, unfortunately the Carina Nebula was below the horizon so I couldn't test on it, the Carina is really breathtaking through the Lumicon UHC. Next time I'm going to compare the Astronomik 2" to the Lumicon 1.25" which I didn't have with me, I'm hoping that it was just the seeing otherwise I'll eBay it and get the 2" Lumicon. Another combination I want to try the 2" TVs with is through the f6.8 reducer. It seemed like there was heaps of skyglow. We made sure that we were in total darkness, no lights except purely red lights. Yes lots of objects and stars were visible, more than from home but when we were packing up when I turned on the car head lights and we were hit by white light destroying our night adaptation. After we were packed up, I turned off the head lights and I looked up and to my surprise the sight was similar to "dark adapted" eyes!!! Perhaps it was a night of bad seeing after all, which would explain the lack of nebulosity and detail within. The skyglow was obviously quite severe and it wasn't the best I've seen in a dark site, but still an awesome night of observing, leaving me with a hunger for more. Thanks for reading, clear skies, Mariusz
  14. I keep "upgrading" my older pics and it actually turns out better then i thought it would... I first captured Orion RGB on the 7.3.2014 with the moon really close by (18x150sec@ISO200). Later that year i added the running man with RGB data from 26.12.2014 (11x120sec@ISO800), and the pic instantly looked "more complete". Then here a couple of weeks ago i was able to gather 20 min of Ha data (10x120sec@ISO3200]. Not nearly enough with my unmodded 550D, but helped a bit still. It's my first attempt in HaRGB, so i'm quite pleased with. Edit: First is HaRGB, 2nd is the old RGB.
  15. ...It's enought to celebrate, heck it's enough to get drunk I say...! Yesterday it's was clear and so I had to make the yearly M42 image, it's already late for it as it's getting behind the roofs for me but even so i managed to get 7x10 min. subs and another 10x30 secs for the core, cooked it all an there you go, a clean and detailled Orion nebula The image is resized to 50% resolution but still there's plenty of details to take in, check out the trapezium fully resolved, in the full resolution image there's even E and a hint of the F component there at only 800 mm f/l...cool https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/ Hope you enjoy, Cheers, P.S: Thanks to Jerry Lodriguss for the tutorial in PS, I allways get at it when processing images of M42...as I forget how to do it every time
  16. It has been a long time since I last posted on here; primarily due to a change in job that keeps me away from home during the week and a clear sky during my weekends at home has been a rare event in deed. However, the recent planetary alignment has obviously brought me luck, as a combination of being at home and having clear skies, stable atmospherics and no moon finally provided me with an opportunity to fully test the potential of the Altair Wave 115 ED Triplet Refractor, combined with the Planostar 0.79x Reducer/Flattener - and boy was it worth the wait! I wanted to compare the results to my previous scope - the extremely capable (in my humble opinion) Sky-Watcher Explorer 190MN Pro Mak-Newtonian Astrograph. So I chose one of my all-time favourite subjects - M42, the Great Orion Nebula and Running Man. The image I captured using my 190MN was the first of my own astro-photos that made me go wow! The image comprised of 10 x 300s, 10 x 200s and 25 x 45s exposures, captured using a QHY8L and Nebulosity 3 then processed using Photoshop CS6. The final result is now framed and has pride of place on the wall above my desk. I was convinced it was going to be hard to beat. My previous attempt at M42, using the Sky-Watcher Explorer 190MN Pro Now, before I compare the images I must point out that this is not going to be a direct, scientific comparison. For a start, there are a couple of significant differences between the 2 scopes; FOV being the most obvious, with 1.35° x 0.9° for the 190MN Pro, vs 2.13° x 1.42° for the 115ED with the 0.79x Reducer/Flattener fitted. The aperture being another significant difference, with the 190MN Pro being 65% larger than that of the 115ED. The 190MN Pro is also marginally faster, with a Focal Ratio of 5.3, vs 5.53 for the 115ED. However, I did use the same QHY8L CCD camera to capture the image and the NEQ6 mount and Lodestar XPress guide camera were also the same. In an attempt to compensate for the smaller aperture and slightly slower Focal Ratio, I increased the length of the exposures to allow as much light to reach the camera's sensor as possible. The final image, which you can see below, is the result of 14 x 600s and 15 x 30s exposures, captured using the QHY8L and Nebulosity 4, then processed using Photoshop CS6. Some may say this is an unfair comparison, but all I wanted to do was see if the Altair Wave 115ED was capable of achieving similar results to the Sky-Watcher Explorer 190MN Pro. The answer is yes - definitely! But that is my opinion - let me know what you think. My latest version, using the Altair Wave 115ED and 0.79x Reducer/Flattener
  17. Orion 14.01.2016.jpg

    From the album DSO, Nebula, Galaxies, Comets etc

    The Orion constellation taken 14.01.16 using Canon 100D on Skywatcher Star Adventurer. A reworking of my original image using Gimp. Bringing out the detail and colours of the nebula has unfortunately also brightened the LP to the lower half of the image. You can clearly see M42 The Orion Nebula within "the sword", and there is The Flame Nebula and The Horsehead Nebula around the bottom left star of "the belt". You can also see an element of Barnard's Loop which is the red band that curves around the left hand side of the image.

    © Vicky050373

  18. This has become a tradition ever since I first got my EQ drive, to snap a shot of the awesomely beautiful Orion Nebula at least once during its tenure in the night time sky. No stacking subs, darks, biases, or flats. Just a fun one-off [1x30s] using my Nikon and my Orion 127mm Mak-Cass (my Lil' Mak). Enjoy, loungers! See you 'round the galaxy! Reggie
  19. M42 The Orion Nebula 14.01.2016

    From the album DSO, Nebula, Galaxies, Comets etc

    Taken using Canon 100D on SkyWatcher Star Adventurer - 300mm lens, 30 second exposure at ISO 1600 Lightly processed in PS Elements 11

    © Vicky050373

  20. Orion Constellation 14.01.2016

    From the album Stars and Constellations

    Taken using Canon 100D on Skywatcher Star Adventurer - 55mm lens - single 4 minute exposure at ISO 800 You can clearly see M42 The Orion Nebula within "the sword", and there is a hint of The Flame Nebula and The Horsehead Nebula around the bottom left star of "the belt" Taken during a trip out to The Dales on Thursday night at a nice dark site between Kettlewell and Hawes

    © Vicky050373

  21. M42 The Orion Nebula 14.01.2016

    From the album DSO, Nebula, Galaxies, Comets etc

    Taken using Canon 100D on SkyWatcher Star Adventurer - 300mm lens, 30 second exposure at ISO 1600

    © Vicky050373

  22. M42, Running Man And Ifn

    Hi Everyone, This is my best M42 image till date. Every year I take a shot at this wonderful object and every year it teaches me something new. I started using Pixinsight only two days ago and the results are dramatic. I do take more care while processing and it has given me wonderful results. C&C welcome.
  23. Not my best efforts but it was nice to be able to image anything! Taken with my ED120 and Canon 1200d. Various issues last night including the computer crashing at one point, fireworks, satellites..... Peter
  24. Great Nebula in Orion (M42)

    A quick shot of the Orion Nebula (M42), one of my favourite celestial objects and a really satisfying target. I've been waiting a year for an opportunity to image this nebula again, this time with a polar alignment and guiding to enable much longer exposures than the 15 second subs I took last time and with a lower ISO to reduce noise. 13 x 4 minute exposures at 400 ISO 8 x dark frames 10 x flat frames 21 x bias/offset frames (subtracted from flat frames only) Total exposure time - 52 minutes Guided with PHD Processed in Nebulosity and Photoshop
  25. 6th December 2015 Equipment: NexStar 8SE Time: 01:00 - 03:45 During the imaging of Barnard33 through the OIII filter using the 80mm refractor, I setup the 8SE on the single arm alt-az mount for observing. Orion Nebula looked great and bright through just the eyepiece but when using the UHC filter it was detailed and awesome. The shape of the nebula was clearly visible, the fishes mouth and the mustache shaped extends were very distinctly brighter than the reminder of the nebula. There was a lot of the nebulosity visible starting to take on the shape of the "flame" as photographed except it was more rounded. The four stars in the trapezium were bright and distinct. The second object I was looking for to observe was the globular cluster 47Toucana. When I located, it was not in the database of the NexStar 8SE hand controller (atleast not as 47Toucana), it looked dimmer that I was expecting. I spend a bit of time looking at the globular through both the 40mm eye piece and the 11mm Nagler... Both showed a dim image of the globular. Through the 11mm I did see some granulation and irregularly speckled stars extending out from the core. I did a "identify object" scan on the hand controller and it come up as NGC362 and the next nearest object was NGC265 in the list. Looking up the objects NGC362 is magnitude 8 and 47Toucana NGC104 is magnitude 5.8. Both of these objects should be a lot brighter in the eyepiece than the object I was observing and struggling, just barely resolving stars around the globular. That point brings me to the next nearest object, NGC265. In StarWalk it's shown to be magnitude 12.5 and when squinting and de focussing my vision on the shown picture it definitely resembles the shape, brighter/denser core and speckled stars at the outer edges. It also makes a lot more sense for it to be so dim in the FOV when looking at it through a telescope with a maximum resolving power of magnitude 14.5. So I think I was actually looking at NGC265, and not 47Tucana or NGC362. The reason why the catalog on the NS8 hand controller shown NGC362 as a first choice if because the object was manually found after locating the constellation Toucana, the three objects are close together, the NS8 has very little objects in this part of the sky in the database and the star alignment might have been a few degrees off. The reason I didn't look up the data and thought the NGC362 was the Globular cluster 47Toucana is because I didn't want to turn on the iPhone or the iPad and destroy my night adapted vision...REMINDER: GET RED FILM FOR IPHONE AND IPAD. 47Toucana needs to be looked for and observed another night.... So does NGC362 for that matter and compare to NGC265 to confirm the above theory. The next object I wanted to find and observe for the first time was the Horsehead nebula. Reading others observation about the Horsehead, some claim to have spotted it in 4" refractors from dark skies, I though that I might have a chance from my semi dark location. I located Alnitak and looked for any hint of the Horsehead or Flame nebulae with no luck, than I spend a few minutes looking for the nebulae using UHC and OIII filters with no luck. I rushed a bit using the UHC and OIII since it's commonly documented that a h-beta filter is the best filter to spot it. Through the h-beta filter Alnitak was still quite bright but the background was a lot darker, but I still couldn't spot either the Flame or the Horsehead nebulae. I've spend a fair bit of time looking for it through both the 40mm and 11mm eyepieces but at the end before I gave up I still couldn't spot any of them. When I brought my head up and looked at the sky toward Orion's Belt, it was quite obvious that my sight was quite dark adapted since the sky was glowing, it was almost milky bright... I put not seeing the Horsehead nebula down to the sky glow being much too bright for it to come through. The hunt will need to continue another night. The last object I observed was The Carina Nebula. As previously the Carina nebula is a sight to behold, it is definitely my favorite nebula to observe along with the Orion Nebula. It looks stunning through the UHC filter and 11mm eyepiece, the detail in the brightest arm was visible clearly, although not as defined as the last time I looked at it, but close. Through the 40mm eyepiece and the f6.3 focal reducer, there was a lot of the nebula visible in the FOV. Not only the brightest arm, but also the other two features that starts to make the "storm trooper face" shape. This is another object that I always spend a considerable time observing through various magnifications. Both the Orion and Carina nebulae have a slight blue-gray color look to them through the UHC filter which gives it a almost painted appearance. Tonight I was not going to get stopped by dew like last time I was observing so I ran a RCA loom from the CGEM and through a gender changer connected the 8SE dew heater strap, seems to have done the trick since there was no dewing of the optics. The seeing was quite still tonight but as dark adaption revealed, the sky glow was quite bright. Toward the end of the observing session some thin cloud patches were coming and going, not interfering with the imaging. Tonight was definitely a great night of observing. MG