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Found 11 results

  1. Update 16th June: I could not wait to tell people that I was just notified that my image of Omega Centauri will be published as a future NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day ( APOD ) - my first ever I will update the thread when they publish. ................................. A deep look at Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) This image is an attempt to look deeply into the the Omega Centauri globular cluster by using HDR techniques to record as many faint stars as I can whilst retaining colour and detail in the bright stars, including at the core ... ............. Reprocessed to bring out more faint stars and to produce a smother transition between brightness levels. New version ( 12 June 2017 ): Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see lager and sharper ) .......... Old version: Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see full size and sharper ) Image details: from www.nova.astrometry.net: Size: 58.6 x 39 arcmins, Centre: 13h 26 min 50.4 sec, -47deg 28' 39.1''. Orientation: up is -89.9 East of North ( ie. E^ N> ). Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). No filter Long Exposure noise reduction off Location:. Blue Mountains, Australia. Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture: 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing:. Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 9 sets. HDR combination. Pixinsight May 2017
  2. Update: 3rd June Re-processed to remove slight magenta tint caused by the non-uniform removal of light pollution by the DBE process ( it was being fooled by the very bright image centre ). The globular star cluster Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) A full size image can be found here. original below ..... A newly captured ( May 2018 ) image of the great southern globular star cluster, Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus - ( please click / tap image to see larger and sharper ) A full size ( ~ 6000 x 4000 ) image can be found here ....... This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the colours of the stars, including in the core. Image details: Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( up is North ) Focal ............. 1375.99 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 20.9" x 38' 55.1" Image center ...... RA: 13 26 45.065 Dec: -47 28 27.26 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher Eq8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)\ Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( May 2018 ) 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  3. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Centaurus. Located at a distance of 15,800 light-years, it is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way at a diameter of roughly 150 light-years. It is estimated to contain approximately 10 million stars and a total mass equivalent to 4 million solar masses. This photo was imaged using a 8" SCT and a Canon 40D DSLR at 2032mm focal length. The total exposure was 97 minutes, 17x60sec, 12x 150s and 10x300sec subs at ISO800.
  4. Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Centaurus. This photo was imaged as a side project using my 8SE on the CGEM and the modded Canon 40D at 2032mm focal length. The total exposure was 97 minutes, 17x60sec, 12x150s and 10x300sec subs at ISO800. Clear Skies,
  5. A deep look at Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) edit: re-processed from the original exposures - April 2018 ........ previous version: Omega Centauri ( please click / tap on image to see larger and much sharper ) This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the subtle colours of the stars, including in the core. ( re-processed from May 2017 subs - master dark added to workflow, new HDR / colour process workflow and stretched using ArcSinh ) Image details: Field of view ..... 58' 32.3" x 38' 55.6" Image center ...... RA: 13 26 50.290 Dec: -47 28 39.80 Orientation: East is up, North is to the right Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( May 2017 ): 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 9 sets HDR combination ArcSinh stretch Pixinsight March 2018 Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay www.flickr.com/photos/mike-oday
  6. 14-15 May 2015Equpiment: NexStar 8SE On the night of 14/15 May as I continued to image Lamda Centauri nebula through the Sulfur single Ion filter through my refractor, I had to keep an eye out for passing clouds.. there were moments when thick clouds moved 15 or so minutes at a time over the patch of sky I was imaging, so I had to be near it to stop the exposure as the clouds rolled in then start it as they went away….Autoguiding of the running chicken nebula was done by OAG and Celestron NexGuide. So I thought, one thing I haven’t done in way too long was do some nice old fashioned eyepiece observing…. I set up the SCT on the Alt-Az mount I’ll tell you I had some awesome views… AWESOME…. First I looked at Saturn…. It was bright and massive at 406X magnified… clearly visible was the Cassini division in the rings, the cloud belts and ring shadow on the globe and 6 of its moons around it…. then after about 30 or 40 minutes of absorbing that view I moved onto the Omega Centauri… first with the low power 50X magnified… the globular cluster was clear, and a clear fuzzball of stars in the eyepiece circle…. Then I tried the TV11mm Nagler I recently received. The view in high power… what I saw has to be seen to be believed, at 185X not only was the globular massive and the individual stars were resolvable in the CORE!!!! The Core!!! But because the eyepiece is wide view the circle was not visible, it was almost out of the peripheral, so it was like looking into space through a window…. Awesome…. Then I went toward the Jewel Box near the southern cross… at low power the distinct “V” shape of the Jewel box was obvious and the different colors of the stars were visible. But with the high power eyepiece not only were the different colors of the stars visible and glistening but there were so many stars in the view that the “V” shape was almost lost, why it’s called the “Jewel Box” was plainly visible. Next target was the Carina nebul. Here I had to use the ultra high contrast filter to dim out the stars that overwhelm the nebula and I bs you not, with the filter there were actual whisps, folds and structures are visible within the nebula… stuff normally expected to need to be long exposed to see, but were visible through the eyepiece! Before those four I just described I looked at the Lagoon Nebula, the Trifid nebula and the butterfly nebula but those were too low into and toward lights from CBD so the details were washed out, I still saw the “lagoon” in the lagoon nebula but not as defined as it would be at a dark location or position in the sky. The Trifid and the butterfly were just a barely visible smudge. The butterfly had the shape of it visible but only barely. I remember when I took the scope to the mountains and looked at the Trifid nebula from there, the shape of the Trifid was clearly visible as well as the breaks in the “flower” part, tonight was not even close. I’ll tell you... it doesn’t seem like a lot of objects were looked at but more than 3 hours went by like nothing…. I didn’t feel that my bones have frozen through until I realized what time it was and that the object I was imaging moved behind the trees and buildings in the distance. In the last few years I mostly did astrophotography but after tonight I think I need to do more traveling to dark sites and do lot more observing. MG
  7. My image of Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) has been published as the NASA APOD for the 11th of July 2017 https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170711.html Link to full size image on NASA site ( warning quite large - 4620 x 3720 ) Link to discussion of image on asterisk.apod.com ( credit apod.nasa.gov ) ( full size image - 4620 x 3720 ) Link to original post for this image back on the 10th of June
  8. Hi, Tried to image my favourite globular cluster. Turned out not too bad! Only took umpteen tries to get the colour right, or should I say close. I remember seeing this through my mate's 14 dob at a dark site once, could not stop saying "oh wow", looks so much better than in my 8" LX90. http://www.pbase.com/grahammeyer/image/167207230 Details under image and you can use the size buttons at the bottom also. Thanks for looking.
  9. I made these two movies on how to find Omega Centauri and Eta Carinae Nebula in the Southern Sky. This was on the back of a great night two nights ago where the conditions were pretty good and got views of both of them. Though Omega Centauri was quite low on the horizon so would have been a lot better if I waited a few hours. Eta Carinae Nebula was just fantastic, it’s a huge object and the nebula extends a long way from the central bit. How to find Omega Centauri How to find Eta Carinae Nebula
  10. I'm currently on a business trip to Melbourne and had the foresight to bring my cheap and nasty 10x50's that I don't mind having putting in as hold luggage on the plane. I couldn't take my decent bins as I'm lugging a laptop, so would be too much hassle take as hand luggage as well. A couple of nights ago I was walking back from the office to my hotel across the centre of town and noticed a pretty decent clear sky. Decided to get the bins out and go to the small park opposite the hotel to see what I could find - not having any familiarity with the southern sky. I was very surprised at how much I saw from the city centre - light pollution is nowehere near as bad as I get from my home in London. Centaurus and Crux were near the zenith slap bang in the middle of the winter milky way. There are a lot of very bright clusters in that region from Centaurus through Carinae. In 20 mins I bagged NGC 2516, NGC 3114, NGC 3293, IC 2602, NGC 3532, all of which are some of the loveliest binocular objects I've seen. The icing on the cake was Omega-Centauri; a globular cluster that makes M13 look like a mote of dust. Utterly gobsmaking. Very bright and about 3 times the size of M13. I'm here for another week and can't wait for another clear sky!!
  11. hjw

    Omega centauri 50% 1080p

    From the album: HEQ5/SW 80ED

    Apparently this is the largest and brightest globular cluster and yes it is quite impressive. (30 subs 30 sec each ISO 1600 - Image reduced to 50% and cropped to 1080p)
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