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Found 5 results

  1. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a reprocessed image of the Helix Nebula Data I captured and posted previously. This image has been exposed across 4 nights, 2 nights through a HAlpha filter and 2 nights through a OIII filter using my modded 40D. Helix nebula is fainter than I thought it was going to be, I had to image it at ISO800 30 minute HAlpha subs and ISO1250 OIII 30 minute subs, total of 8 hours through each through my 8" SCT at F10. I just wish I captured more clearly the comet shock waves visible in the Hubble images... But overall I'm happy with how it came out... As always there is room for improvement...

    © Mariusz Goralski

  2. This one has been on my bucket list for ages, I'm well pleased to get this. The advantage of having a southerly site I guess. 24x600s Ha, 15x240s L, R, G & B all 1x1 binned, darks, flats and bias, equipment as per sig, Pixinxight. The Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) is a large planetary nebula located in the constellation Aquarius. It is one of the closest planetary nebulae to the Earth at an estimated distance is about 700 light-years. It was formed by an intermediate to low-mass star, which shed its outer layers near the end of its evolution. The remnant central stellar core is destined to become a white dwarf star. The observed glow of the central star is so energetic that it causes the previously expelled gases to brightly fluoresce. A fun fact - if you zoom in on Flickr you can see hundreds of comet-like streaks at the inner edge of the red ring that point towards the middle - well the blob at the head of *each* one of those is (very) roughly the size of our whole solar system ! Again, just for fun, here was my first attempt from a few years back, with an unmodded DSLR. Which one do you prefer ? Hope you enjoy, comments and cc welcome, Cheers, Stuart
  3. Hello everyone, Finally I finished the Helix nebula image. This image has been exposed across 4 nights, 2 nights through a HAlpha filter and 2 nights through a OIII filter using my modded 40D. Helix nebula is fainter than I thought it was going to be, I had to image it at ISO800 30 minute HAlpha subs and ISO1250 OIII 30 minute subs, total of 8 hours through each through my 8" SCT at F10. I just wish I captured more clearly the comet shock waves visible in the Hubble images... But overall I'm happy with how it came out... As always there is room for improvement... Any comments and tips welcome... Thanks for looking... Mariusz
  4. Hello all, Due to the rain and clouds I reprocessed the Sculptor and Helix Nebulae. A mate came over and found a astrophotography processing method in photoshop using the "high pass" filter... I gave it a go and it seems like I got a bit more detail out of the Sculptor Galaxy and Helix Nebula data... What do you astronomers think... improvement or too much? Thanks for looking, MG
  5. I have only managed to image half a night so far in 2017, mainly due to the weather, so while waiting for clear skies (Thursday - Friday looks possible over here) I need to keep up and maybe improve my processing skills. So, I have had another go at some old POSS2 data. POSS2 is a 1990ies sky survey based on monochrome glass plate images (red or blue filtered) taken with a 1.2-m Schmidt camera at the Mt. Palomar Observatory. Data is available at: http://archive.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/dss_form This is an RGB image made from POSS2 red and blue filter data with a synthetic green channel (a 50:50 mix of red and blue). All processed in PS CS5. Noise behaves a bit different in these glass plate images, and zooming in you see the silver grains of the photographic emulsion (at least I think that is what it is) before you see the pixels. Comments and suggestions most welcome.
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