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Found 7 results

  1. alan4908

    M67

    I decided to try a LRGB image of the open cluster M67 since I quite like the "glowing" effect that the Lum channel provides on the stars, in addition, it also helps to capture any dim fuzzies that may be lurking in the background. I selected 300s sub exposures, down from my normal 600s, to avoid excessive star bloat. To maximize star colour, I also decided to process the image using two different DDP stretches of the Lum, a high one, targeting the dim objects and one low, targeting the bright stars. The result image was then blended together in PS with an appropriate mask. The cluster is unusual in that it is incredible ancient (c3billion years), somehow, it has resisted the gravitational forces which tend to disperse most open clusters over several hundred million years. As a consequence, M67 has more yellow/red and less blue stars than younger open clusters. The image below represents just under 3.4 hours integration time and was taken with my Esprit 150. Alan LIGHTS: L:9, R:13, G:9, B:10 x 300s, DARKS:30, BIAS:100, FLATS:40 all at -20C.
  2. rory

    couple of o/c's

    these are not great sketches by any stretch, but i was shivering and my current eyepiece set up isnt ideal for these open clusters as x50 is my lowest power at the moment.
  3. Here is the 2nd of two open clusters that I imaged on 7 March 2018. Same capture plan for both - QSI583wsg-5 through my 4" TSAPO100Q (L=6x600; RGB=3x600 each). Cheers, Geof
  4. alan4908

    M67

    From the album: Deep Sky III

    An LRGB image of the open cluster M67. I selected 300s sub exposures, down from my normal 600s, to avoid excessive star bloat. To maximize star colour, I also decided to process the image using two different DDP stretches of the Lum, a high one, targeting the dim objects and one low, targeting the bright stars. The result image was then blended together in PS with an appropriate mask. The cluster is unusual in that it is incredible ancient (c3billion years), somehow, it has resisted the gravitational forces which tend to disperse most open clusters over several hundred million years. As a consequence, M67 has more yellow/red and less blue stars than younger open clusters.
  5. An LRGB image of the open cluster M67 that was previously posted in the Deep Sky imaging section. It represents just under 3.4 hours integration time and was taken with my SW Esprit 150 and SX Trius 814 camera. The image was captured with relatively short (300s) sub exposures, mainly in an attempt to avoid camera non-linear effects from bright stars. It was processed with four software packages: CCDstack: calibration, registration, data rejection, stacking, DDP stretch. PS: colour enhancement, colour linear stretch, mask generation, noise reduction Pixinsight: gradient reduction (DBE) and Photometric colour calibration. Neat Image: background noise reduction To avoid excessive star bloat and to maximize star colour, I also decided to process the image using two different Digital Development Process stretches of the Lum, a high one, targeting any dim objects and a low one, targeting the bright stars. The result image was then blended together in PS with an appropriate mask. Alan LIGHTS: L:9, R:13, G:9, B:10 x 300s, DARKS:30, BIAS:100, FLATS:40 all at -20C.
  6. A quick RGB run on M67 - mostly as a test bed for a new guiding setup (OAG in fromt of the camera, rather than the in camera guide chip behind the filters). Guiding was fine, sky conditions were fairly average, and there was a reasonably full moon in the sky for some of the subs which didn't help! SBIG ST2000XM, WO FLT110 + FLAT4 on the Titan, taken on 15/20th March 2017. R:G:B = 90:75:65 in 5 min subs. Cheers
  7. 06.02.13 a rare (very rare) clear sky gave me a chance to get the scope out. with no real plan as such, there were a few messiers i wanted to get sketched. although seen at least once before,some were with my old 90mm scope so a revisit was in order. m44 the beehive cluster in cancer the crab. 3.1 mag. shame i dont posess a lower power than x50 at the moment as this is a large cluster and sketching it at this magnification really does not do justice . but a nice easy target to shake of the rust. a short shift south and onto a favourite o/c of mine m67. 6.9 mag. sketched at x60. with those two done i took a swing over to puppis for a look at the o/c's id seen back in feb last year with the old scope. m46.is a magnitude 6.1 cluster with a planetary nebula within. the p/n (ngc2438) could be made out as a faint but actually fairly large patch at x 150 . its actually a foreground object around half the distance of the cluster . after viewing at higher power i dropped down to x50 to sketch. a nudge 2 o clock from m46 brought me onto the brighter 4.4 mag open cluster m47. quite a nice cluster with the centre few stars resembling a shape of the number 5 on a dice. as i write i recall wanting to see if ngc2440 was achievable ,but totally forgot ! so the last target of the night was m48 . a mag 5.8 o/c. large bright cluster and at x 50 could see several dozen stars. so okay , nothing new, apart from the planetary,but was enjoyable just to get out in the cold for a couple of hours. i noticed the lion rising up andwas tempted to stay out and get some more objects viewed , but the cold and work in the morning stopped that. clear skies all...
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