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Found 69 results

  1. wimvb

    ngc1499-m45

    From the album: wvb_dso

    11* 300 seconds @ ISO 1600 Camera: Pentax K20D Optics: Kit lens 35 mm @ f/4.5 Mount: SW EQ3-2 GoTo Processed in PixInsight Taken in december 2015. Had some issues with the mount, hence the star trails.
  2. f33n3y

    M45 Pleiades

    Hi, First post on SGL so hello everyone and thanks for all your posts. They have helped me greatly to hit the ground running with my new hobby! This is my first ever DS image taken on 4th night out with my scope. I spent the first 3 sessions practising setting up, polar aligning and imaging moon etc. Last night I nearly never ventured out because of the moon and cloudy forecast but so glad I did! When aligning my finderscope I stumbled upon M45 and decided to give it a bash. Managed around 40subs before clouds rolled in and moon came up but very chuffed with my first result! Criticisms and advice more than welcome Image + Processing: M45 Pleiades 01/04/18, from back garden in southside of Glasgow ~40 x 30sec subs 10 Darks DSS + Photoshop (Messed with curves, levels and used Gradient Xterminator) Equipment: Skywatcher 200PDS HEQ5Pro mount CanonEOS1200d
  3. alan4908

    M45 (close up)

    From the album: Deep Sky III

    An RGB image with a synthetic Lum layer. I decided to try taking a close up of M45 since I was interested in revealing the details of the nebula. I like the details and the star colours, however, I think I prefer a wider field of view. LIGHTS: R:25, G:14,B:49 x 120s, DARKS:30, FLATS:40, BIAS:100
  4. rotatux

    2013-08-15 pleiades M45

    From the album: Alt-Az / NoEQ DSO challenge

    Try at piggyback on the Mak+Altaz horse. Very difficult to focus dim subjects with those modern lens, real lack of luminosity despite perfect sharpness. Also seems to totally lack color (unless it's saturation). Capture: 1 x 30s x 2000iso, Olympus E-PM1 with M.Zuiko 40-150:4-5.6 at 120mm:7.1 on Celestron 127MAK on Nexstar SLT tracking Alt-Az. Place: near country 50km from Paris

    © Fabien COUTANT

  5. Vicky050373

    M45 The Pleiades 22.11.2015

    From the album: Stars and Constellations

    Taken using Canon 100D with a 300mm lens mounted on Skywatcher Star Adventurer. Single 2 minute exposure - too much moon light and LP to allow the necessary settings to bring out the nebulosity.

    © vicky050373

  6. This started on 10/31/17 I had set my 8SE up at around 7:00 pm Transparency: above average 4/5 Seeing: average 3/5 I viewed a number of objects with my 8SE: M31, M32, M110 was not able to see. M57, M27 are always available. M13, M92 sitting very pretty in a clearer patch of sky than usual to the west. I was early enough to catch some favorites, M8, M16, M17, M20, M21, M22, M23, and M24 I then took a break and when I came back I grabbed my binoculars, 10x50's. First I viewed Pleiades, then Hyades, then over to Mirach, Nu, Mu, and above that to M31. I couldn't see M110 or M32 in binos. I've been searching for Kembles Cascade with binoculars, which I've found with the 8SE, though you can only see two stars at a time at that magnification and narrower FOV. So I'm looking around the general vicinity below Cassiopeia, in Camelopardalis and eventually wander into Perseus and find: The Double Cluster with my binos. I slewed the 8SE over to NGC 884, and NGC 869 to confirmed that I had in fact found the double cluster in my 10x50's I finished my bino tour of the sky on the Coathanger Cluster. I have never viewed the Coathanger cluster through my telescope. Well, maybe once just like M45 and Hyades. I always use binoculars to look at these objects now. I finished the evening on M42 which I end up looking at for nearly an hour through both the binoculars and my 8SE
  7. DoctorD

    M45 30s 8 stack

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M45 taken with Lodestar-C and INED70 with AE x0.6 FR Stack of 8 30s exposures
  8. Comet C/2015 ER61 (PANSTARRS) travelling through Taurus constellation, now passing M45 Pleiades.I've discovered some reflections from inside the optical train (flattener), but don't know any method to remove it from the image.Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-ProMount: HEQ5Pro Camera: QHY168C Filter Optolong L-PRO MAX Luminosity Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MM Guiding scope: Finderscope 9x50 14x300s exposure at -10°C (70 min total) binning 1x1 10xdarks 10xbias
  9. I forgot to share this one last month. Between travel for business and brutally cold weather closing down my nearby imaging location in the mountains I have not had time to image this year. This was taken at the beginning of December and contains a very busy wide field splitting the constellations Taurus and Perseus. The better known DSO's are M45 the Pleiades reflection nebula and NGC 1499 the California emission nebula. The center of the image contains a dark nebula which I am not familiar with and the rest of the region is quite heavily laden in ISM interstellar medium dust. This image was taken with my unmodded T3i Information about this image camera: unmodded T3i ISO:1600 Exposures: 102 x 100s Darks: 5 ugh, mishap Bias:450 frame master Flats:35 Lens:SMC Pentax M* 50mm F1.7 stopped to F4 SQM: 21.1 Seeing: 3/5 Transparency:3/5 Calibrated and partially processed in Pixinsight and finished off in Photoshop CC 2017. M45 and California by Wes Schwarz, on Flickr
  10. Well its taken some time to get to grips with Pixinsight (trial) but im over the moon with the result. 27 x 60 second subs on Nikon D810 with 70-200mm F4 with darks, flats and bias in a light polluted sky at 200mm (I drizzled 2x2). cant wait to get the next one now :-) clear skies, Dan
  11. Hello I wanted to share some recent work of M45 from 1/8/2018 Here we have the Pleiades aka Messier 45, bathing amongst the very faint golden galactic cirrus which spans across the constellation of Taurus. The dust that you see here is actually not emitting light but rather reflecting. It is partially illuminated by the bright 7 stars within the Pleiades and additionally illuminated by our milky way galaxy. I am unclear of the distinction between IFN and galactic cirrus, Galactic cirrus seems to be closer to the core of the milky way. IFN and Galactic cirrus both actually appear in IRAS and Planck thermal dust surveys. Regarding molecular structure, I have read that IFN is comprised of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons which are essentially leftover burned up carbon remains. The IFN reflects light predominantly at 540nm up through 950nm according to Mandel Wilson. Capturing Galactic cirrus and the bluish gray dust surrounding the pleiades requires very dark skies and deep integrations of data which must be carfeully processed. I am not 100% happy with this image yet and there may be a few more renditions, but I hope you enjoy what I have presented. Equipment and image capture: Cameras: Tandem Canon DSLR Full Spectrum modded T2i Unmodded T3i Lenses: Samyang 135mm F2 on each camera Filter: T2i only, Astronomik Clip Luminance L3 Light frames: 468 Exposures:30s Iso: 1600 Darks: 70 Flats:200 Bias: pre established master Seeing was 4/5 Transparency 5/5 Temp 25f SQM 21.6 Data was Fully Claibrated, stacked and registered in Pixinsight. Then partially processed between Pixinisght and Photoshop CC 2018 Messier 45 - 1/8/2018 by Wes Schwarz, on Flickr
  12. Astronomical twilight ends 6:18pm Transparency: 4/5 to 3/5 (above average to average) Seeing: 3/5 (average) Location: Fort Collins, CO Elevation: 4997 ft. (1523 m.) Bortle 6 to 7 skies depending upon which direction you're looking. The Double Cluster is pretty clear tonight. I can see it in my binoculars as well. M31 is very clear, and in the Binoculars as well. I then try and catch M8 which is just barely above the building down the hill from me. The time is 5:40pm MST. M8 gives up it’s nebulosity only using the LP filter I use. Orion UltraBlock Narrowband LP filter. I find M20, M21, M23, M10, M24 with my telescope (8SE) and then: At 6:15 pm, I go for M22, this is a new object for me. M22 is nice and clear, with good granularity, and some individual stars using the 17mm which gives me 119x. This is usually the best globular cluster eyepiece so i leave it in there for the next object. But before I do that, I decide I’m going to find M22 with the 10x50’s using my red dot star pointer. Note: The nice 9x50 RACI finder scope I’m thinking about will not be usable in this way like the crappy little star pointer does. A telrad would be nice I suppose and certainly it's clear why people like them. I'm just looking into making my 8SE non-GOTO (because I'm clearly a star hopper at heart and really want a 16 inch minimum travel dob from Hubble Optics). We shall see if i really even need to do that since I'm actually successfully using the 8SE to teach me the sky. Since I'm taking notes and all. I actually am able to find M22 with my cheap 10x50 bino’s. Fuzzy little ball but definitely there and visible to my binoculars. Next up: M55. It’s roughly 6:27pm MST and I continued through my list. M55 is a nice bright glob tonight. I get down and peer through the star pointer and gauge which section of sky I’m looking for and stand up, put the bino’s to my eyes and with very little searching I found M55! Next was M25, not sure I found that with my binos really. Then I was at M18, M17, M16 all three were lovely. It was roughly 6:48pm by then. Because I was mainly looking for nebulosity I didn’t try these three with the 10x50’s. I’m sure i should have. I catch a glimpse of M76 when I thought I was slewing to M16 in the prior group. I thought, what a waste of battery power. I looked at it briefly, and slewed back to the object on the list, M16. Next was M11 which I then found with my 10x50’s. A nice little dusting of stars in the binoculars! Following that was M13 which gave a particularly clear view this evening. I have been looking at star charts for quite a while now, and I have something of a photographic memory (comes in handy during band practice!). So I used the star pointer to give me the section of sky. This section of sky is really hard to look at and not loose your dark adaptation. I use an eyepatch and a black t-shirt pulled over my head backwards as a hood to keep stray ground light out. But trying to find something in the sky and star hop to M13 seems really not doable to me. However, the star pointer does show me where M13 is and I find it easily between Eta and Zeta Herculis. Just southwest? Of Eta Herculis. Now, this is the cool part. Because I’ve looked so often at the Hercules constellation, I had a good idea that you just went back to Eta and then you could find M92 between Eta and Iota Herculis. Slightly more than halfway. And there it is, a short star hop after finding M13, I find M92 without the telescope helping me. From a star chart in my memory. Awesome. Emboldened by this additional object added to my list of things I’ve seen with my 10x50 binos, I went back to Cassiopeia and hunted around there using the 10x50's to look for NGC 663 and NGC 7789. I definitely see NGC 663. I find M45, Hyades, Aldebaran, I use Delta and Gamma Cas to point me towards NGC 884 and NGC 869 aka the Double Cluster. As always, it is beautiful to see. I really like the 10x50’s. Really looking forward to the 20x80’s I’m getting next. Next I aimed my 8SE towards M57. I tried to see that with my 10x50’s but couldn’t. I thought I did but couldn’t confirm it. About 7:30pm MST I slewed over to M56. This is a nice Globular. Bright, granularity, some individual stars. Very nice. I go for this one in the bino’s and there it is! At 7:39 or so, M27 was up in the 8SE and i tried for that with the 10x50’s and I do believe I found that as well! M71 right after that, and yes, I did in fact use the 10x50’s on this object and found it as well. From M71 I found the Coathanger Cluster. So there are a couple new, easy to find (i think) objects M27 and M71 between Deneb and Altair just south of the coathanger cluster. I’m sure I can do better at star hopping but this is a lot of fun making my 8SE actually teach me something. M29, the cooling tower, very nice in the scope, very not found in the bino’s. I’ve been looking for this object in the binos for a while. It’s pretty easy to know where it is, there all close to Deneb and all. It being just south and above of Gamma Cygni. But seeing the cooling tower in the 10x50’s might be impossible. Maybe the 20x80’s. I went on to M15 around 7:43 pm MST. Very bright! Wow, this is amazingly bright! I handily found this in my binos as well!. M2, M73, M72 all found first by the 8SE and then by star pointer to my binos. Right at 8:00 pm MST I saw M30 on the list. I know this is a new object. So my crazy memory tells me. So i slew to M30 and gaze upon its beauty for many minutes in the 8SE. I find it easily in my binos with the help of my telescope. Last couple objects on the list: M77 - 8:09 pm MST this is only visible by slewing the telescope and introducing motion. I did not find it with the 10x50’s. M76, which was given a glimpse earlier was not findable by my lazy, about to call it a night, eye. The temperature was 36 degrees and my hands were beginning to hurt from the cold a bit. The thought of going inside and playing guitar instead of freezing in the somewhat stout wind (6 or 7 miles per hour) is probably why I couldn’t find the little dumbbell nebula. I see one object on my list from that night I skipped. M34. It keeps getting on the list then falling off at the last minute… it’s still early in the season for that object though. Although I didn’t even stay out long enough to see Orion coming up (over the tree). I thought to myself, as I packed things up around 8:20pm MST, that was a pretty short session. But it was action packed with lots of new bino objects found! Tonight (11-14-17) the transparency is “transparent” it is supposed to be cloud free but the seeing is bad (1/5) to poor (2/5) and 20 mile an hour winds. So no star gazing with anything but Binoculars in a parka on a zero gravity chair for me tonight. I'll let you know how many of those new targets I can see tonight. Pretty sure I’ll be able to find M13 and M92. M27 and M71 will be trickier But I think I can find M30 again. I'm going outside to try in a few minutes here after I post this.
  13. My first go at imaging m45 shot using a vintage super takumar 135, f3.5 iso640 best 80%of 35 120second subs. The camera was mounted on a star adventurer and polar alignment was rough
  14. Leveye

    The Pleiades Finally!

    Have been looking forward to imaging this one for the longest time! The fall weather recently sunk my Comet ISON ambitions over the last week but then the skies cleared last evening and an indian summer night rolled in with perfect seeing yes!22-300 second light exposures at ISO 800, 15 dark frames and 25 bias frames. Levels and curves in PS 5 and some final tweeking in Lightroom. Let me know what you think of the processing. Look up!
  15. This is just a log of my observations last night from my balcony. It has quite a restricted view due to it being recessed so the floor above me gets in the way. It faces south-east-east and I have around 80-90 degrees of azimuth view. If you’re prepared to watch the constellations appear it is ok and put up with the streetlights on the paths it’s ok. I have places nearby where I can set up to get a better view of the sky but it’s summers and I could hear some people having a party in the park. I thought I’d leave them to it as it will be cold in the winter and the night time park will hopefully be empty! I was using my 102mm Mak on an eq2. I’d been hoping to have another attempt at the Ring Nebula in Lyra but the floor above me was getting in the way. I should have got out a bit sooner – with it not really getting dark enough until ~2330 and it going out of view for my viewing spot I’ve only got a short window of opportunity for this target at the moment. So I settled for Albireo. This was the first time I’d gone for this double in Cygnus and it’s a lovely sight. A warm orange spot with it’s hot blue partner. It’s not as hard to split as the Double double (which isn’t hard either but it’s the only double I’ve seen so far which I know the name of J ). I then decided to try and find M31 which isn’t visible to the naked eye for my location but the Andromeda constellation was easy to make out by following along from the belly of Pegasus. M31 proved a hard target to find at first. I’d initially started to use the two stars I could see that formed the waist of Andromeda which seemed from Stellarium could be used as a pointer up towards M31 but no amount of wriggling the scope whilst moving up worked so I consulted Stellarium again. Although I can’t see Polaris to polar align I can get a good enough polar alignment by pointing the polar axis north and the latitude for my location. So I could see that if I went up to the centre of the cross of Cygnus (Sadr), moved my declination up a couple of degrees and then scanned back with RA I might hit M31. Whilst getting my up and down mixed up on my declination axis, I happened across a star cluster which took me by surprise a bit. It seemed that I’d mistakenly found M29 after checking with Stellarium. After M29 I decided to put the scope in the right position I’d intended to scan back to M31 from Sadr in Cygnus. This approach didn’t help either! Back to the drawing board. I used the star near the head of Andromeda as a guide next and moved my declination up whilst giving the scope a wiggle and M31 came in to view. In my little Mak it was only the smudge of the centre but I was surprised how big the smudge was. I was expecting the core to appear smaller but I would estimate that I could see around 0.2 to 0.3 of a degree (I was using a 20mm Erfle which gives me ~1 degree in my scope). Having found M31 I was starting to notice more stars in the sky now. I could see the two brightest stars of Aries and the Triangulum so decided to attempt M33. I spent ages trying to find this but couldn’t do it. After doing some research today though it seems that M33 surface brightness is very low so maybe my scope is too small and I have to be a bit more patient when scanning the sky. The same research threw up the obvious question as to why I didn’t see M32. I should have been able to see it with M31 however I probably mistook it for a star. Now I know how to get M31 I’ll look out for it next time. My next target for the night was M34 as I felt this would be easy to find by scanning in RA from Almaak in Andromeda. Whilst lining up on Almaak I noticed this was double with a small companion. This was a double that I was going to put a name to! I’d seen a few without naming them but it’s so easy to find in Stellarium that I had no excuse although I was a bit thrown out when Stellarium didn’t show it as a double in ocular view. Some wiki research today confirmed this though and Almaak’s companion is a double itself but they are seperated by less than an arc second so not sure if I have the resolving power to try this when I go back to it. I found M34 after looking at the Almaak double. It wasn’t hard to find this time. Whilst the open clusters are nice and I like the way they jump out at you as you’re scanning across I must admit I preferred viewing M13 when I first found it. Even though I couldn’t really resolve stars in M13 I just found it a more exciting target. I suppose as it seems like a galaxy within a galaxy. I could now see Jupiter rising through some trees in the distance so tried to get the double cluster but I was just restricted by the floor above again and I could only see the southern half of Cassiopeia so I went to M45 which I could just see as a smudge 20 degrees or so above the horizon. There’s no way I can get all of the Pleiades in my FOV but it was fun scanning around it and all the other stars appear within it. Finally Jupiter had cleared the trees so I concentrated on this now. The seeing was quite bad, the transparency was getting worse (a haze was starting to develop around the planet) and Jupiter was still quite low.I found that my 10mm plossl was giving me a bit too much magnification and I was better of using my 15mm or my 20mm erfle with the barlow cap in the end to give ~100x magnification. Detail was hard to make out though and I was restricted to seeing 2 bands of brick colour on against the cream background. Unfortunately the moons were nicely spread out this time; I’d been hoping for a repeat of when I watched one of the rise from behind Jupiter a week ago. I’m looking forward to when Jupiter starts rising earlier in the autumn so I can view it higher in the sky to beat the seeing before the Sun rises. So that was last night on my balcony waiting for the earth to spin. Next week looks good my way for weather so hopefully I can repeat it soon.
  16. Christopher Davenport

    5L 4D ISO800 RGB HD2 IA

    From the album: The Seven Sisters - M45 Pleiades

    Taken at 10C, unguided, but well polar aligned. 120 Second subs @ ISO800 10 min stack.
  17. Davide Simonetti

    The Pleiades (M45)

    The Pleiades seen from Kelvedon Common in Essex - 22nd August 2025. 8 x 2 minute exposures at 800 ISO11 x dark frames11 x flat frames24 x bias/offset framesGuided with PHDStacked and calibrated in Maxim DLPost processed in Maxim DL, Nebulosity, and Photoshop
  18. Hi all, heres my attempt at M45 this year. Exposure details: 60x210 seconds, f2.8, ISO 800, calibration frames, 200mm With just under 3 hours 30 minutes this has fallen far from how i wanted it to be. I planned on getting 10 hours! But with cloud forecast all week i'll settle with this till later in the year. I shot using the lens wide open and using the 3rd point focusing method, hoping to have enough light grasp to pick up some of that faint dust in the area. I picked up 7 hours over 2 nights and thats when problems started. My first imaging session was the first time i used my new dew heater, i focused and then turned the heater on which shifted the focus i think, leaving me with over 3 hours of un-stackable data! This image is made up of data from the second session, you can see that the stars appear to trail and i wanted to ask if anyone using this focusing method has ever been left with stars like those in the image? They appear to streak a little bit and look as if they are rotating around a center point. I have spoken to one other person who has experienced this. Because i have recently started using Backyard EOS, im not aware how to set up the live view so you have the 4 intersecting lines (if its even possible) so when focusing i roughly guessed where the intersecting lines would be. If i didnt have the star in the right place, could it have caused the stars to appear the way they do? Anyway, heres the image. Clear skies!
  19. DoctorD

    M45 30s single stack

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M45 taken with Lodestar-C and INED70 with AE x0.6 FR Single 30s exposure
  20. StarRaver

    M45

    From the album: My starting out pics

    shot with an un modded canon 60d through a skywatcher ED80 pro with 0.85 focal reducer / flatner and IDAS P2 LPS filter on a HEQ5 pro mount controlled via EQMOD on the laptop. This is 22 light frames shot at 800iso for 300 seconds each with matching flats bias and dark frames. stacked and aligned with DSS and processed in photoshop / lightroom

    © Dale Dare 2014

  21. alan4908

    M45

    From the album: Deep Sky II

    My second attempt at M45 (the first attempt with my SX26C is within the album Deep Sky I). Although this is not an ideal field of view, the close up of M45 does reveal quite a lot reflection nebula structure. The galaxy at the bottom right is PGC13696. I decided to go for quite a long exposure on the L to bring out the faint dust. I would like to have captured more green and blue data. In total, about 7 hours. LIGHTS:L: 19; R:12: G:5: B:6 x 600s. BIAS: 100; DARKS:30; FLATS: 40 all at -20C.
  22. Here goes one of the summer targets! M45 was shot from the top of mountain Parnon, which is really dark. Lx10 1x1 300secs RGBx22 2x2 80 secs Still learning pixinsight and this was my first try on LRGB (i usually go for just RGB) Full resolution and annotation here Looking forward for your critique! Thanks
  23. rotatux

    2016-09-02 m45 (200mm)

    From the album: Wide-field (not barn-door)

    Capture: 15 lights x 40s x 2500iso, 4 darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Chinon 200mm/3.5 @4 on Omegon EQ-300 tracking RA, neodymium filter Processing: Regim 3.3, Fotoxx 12.01, Gimp 2.8 Date: 2016-09-02 Place: Deep country 26km from Limoges, France

    © Fabien COUTANT

  24. Christopher Davenport

    M45 - First Attempt with 600D

    Hello, I have taken my first steps into DSO Astrophotography last night. It was a bit frustrating as my Polar alignment can really do with some work. I tried to drift align, but I think I just made it worst Anyway I had to reduce my exposures to 120S from 300S and then it seemed stable enough. I captured 8xLights and 4xDarks @ ISO800, 120S, F4.75 (i.e 378mm with my 80ED, used a reducer / flattener) I have still had to crop the image down to size a bit as the corners are a little dark / odd. Stacked in Deepskystacker and then edited in Image analyser - I think I have over processed abit I really want to extract more of the nebulosity, but not sure how to. Anyway enough faff heres the image (Png has been reduced to 3rd of Size) I have two ISO1600, but they are quite washed out, not sure how to use these. 4 of the 8 iso800 lights are best contrast, so might restack with just these. Anybody have any idea on how to use the star mask in DSS? Any comments / suggestions welcome.
  25. jsigone

    M45 with Levy mak-newt

    I feel accomplished I was able to get an image through all the filter before it hit the flip just before midnight. This is about the only reason I like daylight saving time adjustment. Doesn't seem 3min is long enough for the wispy details, I might have to do another night with the Lum filter at longer subs and try to blend it in. Stacked in DSS, PP was in Nebulosity 2. I didn't get to chance to layer it up in photoshop yet. This was done with 60& moon up. M45 LRGB v.01 color check by jsigone, on Flickr
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