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Found 19 results

  1. MarsG76

    M17 - SHO

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband and combined in Hubble palette style. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 8 August 2019.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  2. MarsG76

    M17 Pseudo RGB

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband hAo3hB as RGB. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 4 August 2019.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  3. Hello all, Sharing with you my finished image of the Swan nebula imaged through SII, HII and OIII narrowband filter using my modded and cooled Canon 40D. Imagd trough my C8" SCT at 2032mm focal length. Total exposure was 27 hours across multiple nights. Clear Skies, MG
  4. Hello Astronomers, This is a work in progress, I'm spending my clear moonless nights capturing narrowband data of M17, at 2032mm focal length through my 8" SCT, using my Cooled and modded 40D. I still have SII to capture to complete the project but for now I played with the data I already have. As it turns out that both the HAlpha and OIII subs have a considerable amount of blue data in them, separated due to the DSLR being a OSC camera, so I used the red out of the HAlpha image, green from OIII green channel and added the blue from HAlpha (the Hbeta data) and blue from the OIII stack and used it as the blue channel, resulting in a almost natural color pseudo RGB image, attached. Once I have the SII data, I'll assemble the channels into a SHO narrowband image of M17. Clear skies, MG
  5. Hello All, I exposed the subs for this image almost a year ago and completely forgot about them. This image consists of a total of 16.5 hours exposure time on SII, HAlpha and OIII data over multiple nights of imaging. Imaged through a BOSMA 80mm refractor at 500mm focal length (f6.25) using a full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR. Clear skies, MG
  6. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The subs exposed for this image were done almost a year ago and I completely forgot about them. This image consists of a total of 16.5 hours exposure time on SII, HAlpha and OIII data over multiple nights of imaging. Imaged through a BOSMA 80mm refractor at 500mm focal length (f6.25) using a full spectrum modded Canon 40D DSLR.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  7. Managed a bit of further processing on data captured on holiday - this field of view is something I would really struggle with at home (it's 9 degrees lower, and doesn't rise above my roof from my garden!) - a widefield of the Eagle (M16), Swan/Omega (M17) and M18, as well as a lot of HII in the surrounding areas. The HA filter helped a lot in cutting through the atmosphere - it's not fantastically high from the site we were at, and I still had to have a couple of nights at it dodging the trees. Details: QHY163M + Canon 200mm f2.8L (@f3.85) + Baader 7nm HA filter, mounted on a Losmandy GM8. Exposure 2h50m in 5min subs. Binned a few subs as they were of poor quality. Processing in PI. Thanks for looking At 50% resolution: Partially annotated version (lots of unmarked catalogues not shown, and not sure why Sh2-47 is marked away from the actual object! :
  8. I'm back ! It seems AP is a real slow-burn hobby for me, I'm only really getting chances to take about 3-4 pics per year at the moment. Still, hopefully there'll be plenty of targets left for me when I eventually retire and can get that dream full frame set-point cooled CCD and all the filters. Anyway, here's the latest, taken in August: (click through for full version) About 30 or so lights, a mix of 5min and 7min exposures over 3 nights (well two nights, the middle one was abandoned to cloud), ISO1600, darks, flats and bias, equipment as per sig, modded DSLR, processed in Pixinsight. Hope you like it, I'm quite pleased with it. C & CC welcome. The Swan Nebula, also known as the Omega Nebula or the Horseshoe Nebula (M17) is an H II region in the constellation Sagittarius. It is located in the rich starfields of the Sagittarius area of the Milky Way. The Swan Nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 solar masses. The total mass of the Swan Nebula is an estimated 800 solar masses. It is considered one of the brightest and most massive star-forming regions of our galaxy. Its local geometry is similar to the Orion Nebula except that it is viewed edge-on rather than face-on. The open cluster NGC 6618 lies embedded in the nebulosity and causes the gases of the nebula to shine due to radiation from these hot, young stars. It is also one of the youngest clusters known, with an age of just 1 million years.
  9. The Omega Nebula Took this photo of the Omega Nebula during September 2015. 4.5 Hours of Ha 45 Min of RGB Telescope: Skywatcher P250 Mount; ASA DDM60 Camera: QSI583 Mono Filters: Astrodon Ha 3nm, RGB Gen2 http://www.flickr.com/photos/101543943@N04/21957544470/in/dateposted/ Thanks for watching! Haim
  10. Well, the observatory is finished, most major things are done. Fine tuning everything now, including mount backlash/freeplay, flattener distance and maybe might need a new focuser. First real test image and since I have taken this there has been nothing but rain and cloud, so no chance of colour at this stage. Not a worry really as I'm still trying to find my feet on processing. No deconvolution or sharpening on this image, basically stretched and contrast adjusted. Welcome constructive feedback if you have any, thanks. http://www.pbase.com/grahammeyer/image/166188044/original.jpg
  11. Here is the 2nd image i have taken on my new Mach1 GTO. I had a few dithering issues with the first image but have got that sorted out. This is only 9x600s subs with no calib files in 7nm HA. Very minimal processing in pixinsight and photoshop. This target is very low in my sky and only available for about 2 hours max so i got 1.5 on this for the time being. Maybe collect some OIII and SII in the coming nights. Possibly some RGB to do a HARGB. The guiding so far down south for me was a bit tricky and jumpy but the subs came out ok. Seeing started out ok but as the night went on it got a bit hazy due to humidity here.
  12. Omega Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 17, NGC 6618 ). Visible to the naked eye the Omega Nebula, also known as the Swan, Horseshoe or Lobster Nebula, M17 is in the Milkyway and is aound 4200 light years distance from Earth Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: RA 18h 22m, Dec -16deg 10'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 37 x 100 sec ISO800. Pixinsight & Photoshop 14 August 2015 - processed 3 Oct 2015
  13. Clear skies at last! It's been a while since my last report but hopefully weather armageddon has now past us by and we can get out there doing what we do best. Due to early morning commitments, this was only a short binocular session but still satisfying none the less. I started with a quick check on Ursa Minor and yes, all stars were present and correct. The sky had moved substantially since my last session so I took a little time to familiarise myself with some old friends. M27 (the Dumbbell nebula) stood out quite well in Vulpecula, as did M29 and M39 in Cygnus. Overhead, the Milky Way appeared reasonably clear and it was very enjoyable just sweeping through the rich star fields. To the North-East, Casseopeia was beginning to rise. NGC 663 and M52 were both very obvious in the 15x70s. I couldn't see M32, once I had moved round to Andromeda but M31 filled a substantial part of my field of view. I have only ever seen the Andromeda companions in a scope. I wonder if anyone has managed them with a pair of binoculars. I then moved round to the Southern skies to test the sky out for future reference. In Scutum, M11 (the Wild Duck cluster) looked very nice but I couldn't find M26. To be fair, I didn't spend long looking.... there was Sagittarius (or at least the Northern half of it) just popping his head over the low-ish tree line. M22 was impressive, despite it being so low in the sky. Sadly, I wasn't sure if I could make out M28. Anything further South is impossible due to viewing restriction. M24 was not as clear as I had previously seen it but it is a fine starfield and tolerant of a bit of light thrown up by Medway, which is three miles to the South of me. North in a line from M24, I could find three fuzzies. First was the open cluster M18. I believe this has 20 - 25 members but the binoculars revealed just a very small fuzzy circle. Just North from there was a larger and easier fuzzy area to view. I look forward to getting M17 (the Omega nebula) in my scope sight. Further North again is M16 (the Eagle nebula) though obviously it was just the associated cluster that I could see. Nice to start the season with three new finds. I look forward to spending a little more time with Sagittarius. It is my favourite constellation. __________________________________________________ ______ Observing Session: Sunday 22nd July 2012, 23:30 hrs to 00:05 hrs BST VLM at Zenith: 5.4 New - Revisited - Failed
  14. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Swan Nebula in natural color, total exposure was 55 minutes of 1 and 2.5 minute subs, and a 5 minute sub all ISO1600, taken with a Astro modded canon 40D through a 80mm f6.25 refractor.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  15. From the album: Wide-field (not barn-door)

    M8 "Laguna" nebula, M20 "Trifid" nebula, Small Sagittarius Cloud (star patch), M17 "Omega" nebula and M16 "Eagle" nebula, and a few others. Capture: 10 lights x 15s x 1250iso, 5 darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Helios "44M-6" 58mm/2 at 2.8 on Omegon EQ-300 tracking RA, neodymium filter. Date: 2016-07-24 Place: near country 50km from Paris, France

    © Fabien COUTANT

  16. Hi all, As I'm slowly going through my data from July, this time I processed the RGB data of the Swan Nebula. This Nebula can really use a bit more magnification, so now I'm thinking of revisiting it with my SCT next season. At this focal length it's too small, but 1280mm or 2032mm through the 8" SCT should make it more impressive. I still have the narrowband data to process so hopefully the SHO image will turn out more dynamic. The total exposure time on this image is only 55 minutes, 20x60 second, 12x150 second and only 1 of 300 second subs, all at ISO1600. Taken with a modded 40D through a 80mm refractor at 500mm FL. Clear Skies, MG.
  17. From the album: Wide-field (not barn-door)

    M11 "Wild Duck" cluster, to M16 "Eagle" nebula and M17 "Omega" nebula. (try shots for new lens) Capture: 10 lights x 3.2s x 2500iso, 5 darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Helios "44M-6" 58mm/2 at 2 on fixed tripod (and no LP filter) Date: 2016-07-10 Place: near country 50km from Paris, France

    © Fabien COUTANT

  18. Omega Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 17 , NGC 6618 ) ( click on image to see larger ) Omega Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 17, NGC 6618 ). Visible to the naked eye the Omega Nebula (also known as the Swan, Horseshoe or Lobster Nebula) M17 is in the Milkyway and is aound 4200 light years distance from Earth. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: RA 18h 22m, Dec -16deg 10'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'Nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 37 x 100 sec ISO800. Pixinsight & Photoshop 14 August 2015 re-processed 8 Aug 2016 with current workflow.
  19. From the album: HEQ5/SW 80ED

    60x 60sec ISO1600
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