Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_the_milky_way.thumb.jpg.dbd8b15e81d11e9303c8d6ef1898ac08.jpg

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'lodestar'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome
    • Welcome
  • Beginners
    • Getting Started General Help and Advice
    • Getting Started Equipment Help and Advice
    • Getting Started With Observing
    • Getting Started With Imaging
  • Community
    • Official SGL Announcements and Events
    • SGL Challenges and Competitions
    • SGL Star Parties
    • Star Parties & Astro Events
    • Celestial Events Heads Up
    • The Astro Lounge
    • Social Groups & Observatories
  • Retailers
    • Sponsor Announcements and Offers
    • FLO Clearance Offers
    • Supplier Reviews
  • Astro Classifieds
    • For Sale / Swap
    • Wanted
  • Equipment
    • Discussions - Scopes / Whole setups
    • Discussions - Binoculars
    • Discussions - Mounts
    • Discussions - Eyepieces
    • Discussions - Cameras
    • Discussions - Software
    • DIY Astronomer
    • DIY Observatories
    • Member Equipment Reviews
  • Observing
    • Observing - Discussion
    • Observing - Reports
    • Observing - Solar
    • Observing - Lunar
    • Observing - Planetary
    • Observing - Deep Sky
    • Observing - Widefield, Special Events and Comets
    • Observing - with Binoculars
    • Sketching
  • Video Astronomy
    • Video Astronomy
  • Imaging
    • Imaging - Discussion
    • Imaging - Tips, Tricks and Techniques
    • Imaging - Image Processing, Help and Techniques
    • Imaging - Lunar
    • Imaging - Solar
    • Imaging - Planetary
    • Imaging - Deep Sky
    • Imaging - Widefield, Special Events and Comets
    • Imaging - Showcase Threads
  • Science
    • History of Astronomy
    • Observing and Imaging Double and Variable Stars
    • Physics, Space Science and Theories
    • Radio Astronomy and Spectroscopy
  • WADAS's WADAS Discussion Forum

Calendars

  • Astro TV
  • Celestial Events
  • SGL Calendar
  • Astro Society Events
  • Star Parties
  • WADAS's Events

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 30 results

  1. The Rosette Nebula and Cluster ( NGC 2237 and 2244 ) in the constellation Monoceros edit: updated 30th Dec with improved colour balance and slightly increased brightness ... ...... original: ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Still a work-in-progress really... with only 10 x 4min exposures for the main 'lights' before the clouds came over. I will try to add some more data when the moon has gone I am still experimenting with how to get the best out of the D7500. With the very warm nights ( low to mid 20s all night ) the 'warm pixels' are very noticeable so I reverted to my old practice of in-camera dark subtraction. This worked quite well and produced a nice smooth noise floor in the integrated images - albeit at the expense of more exposures. ................. Identification: The Rosette Nebula ( NGC 2237 ) is a large, circular emission nebula in the constellation Monoceros. It surrounds a cluster of hot, young stars known as the Rosette Cluster ( NGC 2244 ). ( SkySafari ) NGC 2237, 2244 Caldwell 49, 50 North is up. .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 23 Dec 2017 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO400. 10 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s imaged ~ +/- 1.5hrs either side of meridian maximum altitude ~ 51.3 deg above north horizon Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and in-camera dark subtraction Integration in 9 sets HDR combination Image Plate Solution =================================== Resolution ........ 0.633 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.181 deg Focal ............. 1367.90 mm Pixel size ........ 4.20 um Field of view ..... 58' 59.4" x 39' 15.0" Image center ...... RA: 06 31 55.638 Dec: +04 56 30.84 ===================================
  2. The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the constellation Fornax edit: new version with new long exposure data ( 52 x 240sec ) and better dark subtraction / dithering to remove streaks in the noise and amp glow. This also allowed for a greater stretch revealing more faint data in the galaxy and small faint fuzzies in the image .. The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in Fornax ( please click / tap to see larger ) and below I have added a 100% crop of new version: ........ original image: NGC 1365 ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) ............... The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the Constellation Fornax Below the equator, not seen from much of the Northern hemisphere, NGC 1365 passes very nearly directly overhead an observer situated near Cape Town, as Sir John Herschel was in November of 1837, or near Sydney, as I was, almost exactly 180 years later, when I photographed this “remarkable nebula” that is numbered 2552 in his book of observations from the Cape. Not called a “nebula” now, of course, this striking object is one of the nearest and most studied examples of a barred spiral ( SB ) galaxy that also has an active galactic nuclei resulting in its designation as a Seyfert galaxy. At around 60 M light years from Earth, NGC 1365 is still seen to occupy a relatively large area ( 12 by 6 arc minutes ) due to its great size; at some 200,000 light years or so across, NGC 1365 is nearly twice as wide as the Milky Way and considerably wider than both the Sculptor and Andromeda galaxies. This High Dynamic Range ( HDR ) image is built up from multiple exposures ranging from 4 to 120 seconds with the aim of capturing the faint detail in the spiral arms of the galaxy whilst also retaining colour in the brightest star ( the orange-red 7th magnitude giant, HD 22425 ). Also, scattered throughout the image, and somewhat more difficult to see, are numerous and far more distant galaxies with apparent magnitudes of 16 to 18 or greater. Mike O'Day ................. Identification: The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy New General Catalogue - NGC 1365 General Catalogue - GC 731 John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837 Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179 ESO 358-17 IRAS 03317-3618 RA (2000.0) 3h 33m 37.2 s DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5" 10th magnitude Seyfert-type galaxy in the Fornaux cluster of galaxies 200 Kly diameter 60 Mly distance .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 22 Nov 2017 ) 6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 120s ) all at ISO400. 70 x 120s + 5 each @ 4s to 60s total around 2.5hrs Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks Integration in 6 sets HDR combination Image - Plate Solution ========================================== Resolution ........ 1.328 arcsec/px Rotation .......... -0.008 deg ( North is up ) Field of view ..... 58' 8.6" x 38' 47.5" Image center ...... RA: 03 33 41.182 Dec: -36 07 46.71 ==========================================
  3. As SGPro are actively promoting the FocusLock focussing system from Optec Optical & Electrical Products. I was wondering if anyone is actively using this system. Preferably with a Lodestar or LodestarX2 and OAG, using the Lacerta kit. Steve
  4. DoctorD

    M45 30s 8 stack

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M45 taken with Lodestar-C and INED70 with AE x0.6 FR Stack of 8 30s exposures
  5. Hi I received a Lodestar-C camera for Christmas (Thanks MrsD)! My primary aim is not astrophotography, rather I'm interested in electronically assisted viewing in as near real time as possible and in colour. Oh and just to make it interesting I want to do this using my Macbook Pro! Due to weather and personal/work commitments it's been difficult to get any quality time under the stars with the Lodestar, however I did manage to grab a half an hour and point the camera an M42. Some would say that this is not the ideal subject due to the high dynamic range, however it did give me chance to play with a beta version of Paul81's Lodestar Live application running on a Macbook Pro (you can follow Paul's development of Lodestar Live here: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/202377-lodestar-live-december-update/#entry2142775). I used my INED70 F6 refractor with a Celestron F6.3 SCT reducer working at about F4.2 mounted on my Minitower (which was carried outside in one go!) and an exposure of 20 seconds (I think). Lodestar Live is very simple to use and allows real time processing of the images which are captured and displayed continuously with the option to save each file in raw and/or processed formats for later stacking if you so desire. About 4 to 5 frames per second is possible allowing easy adjustment of focus and framing. The raw Lodestar data is in 16 bit format which allows a very wide dynamic range to be captured and by adjusting the realtime processing settings in Lodestar Live you can stretch the image to see the details you are looking for. Here's a few screen grabs of the camera and software in action: Single frame, no stretch: Single frame with some stretch & gamma adjust: Single frame with more stretch & gamma adjust: Lodestar Live does not yet support automatic de-bayer of the raw colour data, so as a trial, I used Deep Sky Stacker to do the de-bayer colour conversion and apply a similar stretch and gamma adjustment. De-bayered single frame (in DSS) A big thank you to Maurice (Nytecam) for his inspirational posts on the Lodestar-C which lead to my acquisition of the camera and Paul (Paul81) for his work on Lodestar Live. More to come as and when I get time under the stars - the Lodestar looks like a great replacement for my SDC 435 - larger chip, much lower noise, exposures up to 1 hour and at 20 seconds exposure no apparent AMP glow combined with 16bit digital capture with no PAL colour encoding. Interestingly it's only twice the cost of the SCB4000 which has a similar sized sensor without the other advantages of the Lodestar. Clear skies Paul
  6. Hi I'm streaming live on VAL (19:50 GMT 17-03-16) http://www.videoastronomylive.co.uk/#!doctor-d/c1j5j Enjoy Paul
  7. Hi all, I just had first light with a Hyperstar system on an alt/az Celestron CPC 800 HD and wanted to share the results. Conditions were definitely sub-optimal - Full Moon and poor seeing/light pollution (a lot of the targets were low in the sky) but I wanted to see what the system could do. Exposures were all 20-30 sec, with 4-6 images stacked. Histogram/colour balance/contrast was adjusted, but otherwise no other processing. An IDAS light pollution filter was used throughout. I've noticed vignetting, more noticeable on some shots than others, especially when contrast is really stretched. Not sure about the reason (I know Hyperstars can vignette with larger sensors, but the Lodestar sensor is pretty small; perhaps the T-to-C adapter causes some mechanical vignetting?) If anyone has any feedback, I'd love to hear it! Enjoy, - Greg A
  8. DoctorD

    M82

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    Single Frame captured with Lodestar Live using C8 SCT and F3.3 reducer at F2.8 30 second exposure s viewed on screen during capture (no post processing) only levels and gamma adjustment available in Lodestar Live
  9. DoctorD

    Catalina

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    Comet Catalina C8 F3.3 taken with Lodestar C and StarlightLive 15-01-16
  10. DoctorD

    Catalina

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    Comet Catalina 2013 C8 F3.3 using Lodestar-C - 30 second exposure (15-01-16)
  11. DoctorD

    M45 30s single stack

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M45 taken with Lodestar-C and INED70 with AE x0.6 FR Single 30s exposure
  12. DoctorD

    M42 LSL 2

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 captured using Lodestar live with single 20s exposure - image is as viewed live processed only using Lodestar Live to see extent of nebulosity.
  13. Hi all I'm just in the process of upgrading my guiding and was pretty much going to go for the Starlight Xpress Lodestar (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/guide-cameras/starlight-xpress-lodestar-autoguider.html) but then somebody pointed me at the Baader LVI Smartguider 2 as a possible option (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/guide-cameras/baader-lvi-smartguider-2.html). As you can imagine on the forums I hear lots of great things about the Lodestar and I have always considered it as pretty much the standard in excellence in guiding. I know very little about the Smartguider, it looks to do very similar - and more - things for not a huge amount more money. I'm not in a massively polluted area but I've thought I might benefit from the lodestar's sensitivity in guiding. Anyone have any feedback, experience of both? Pros and cons, etc? Any feedback greatly appreciated! Will
  14. Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) Re-processed to tweak colour balance and bring out a little more faint detail: New version: Original: ( click/tap on image to see full size - the above compressed version looks a little soft; the full size version is sharper ) The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) is the largest and brightest emission nebula in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). At a distance of 160,000 light years away from us, the Tarantula Nebula is so bright that it would cast shadows on the Earth if were as close to us as the Orion Nebula in our galaxy. First image with new telescope and autoguider/setup. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Nebulae: NGC 2070 Tarantula Nebula NGC 2048 NGC 2060 NGC 2077. Open clusters: NGC 2042 NGC 2044 NGC 2050 NGC 2055 NGC 2091 NGC 2093 NGC 2100 Image centre RA 5h 38m 57.3s, Dec -69deg 20' 36.6" (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arcmin): 58.7 x 39.2 Scale (full size image) 0.585 arcsec/pixel. Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, FL1200mm, f4 ) Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x Effective Focal Length / Aperture ): 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Filter: none Exposures: 14 x 240 sec ISO400 12 x 120 sec ISO400 10 x 60 sec ISO400 11 x 60 sec ISO200 10 x 60 sec ISO100 10 x 30 sec ISO100 Pixinsight & Photoshop 20 December 2016
  15. michaelmorris

    Lodestar 1 and 2 compared

    Three years ago I splashed out on a SX Lodestar 1 guide camera because I just couldn't get on with the QHY 5 camera I had bought secondhand. The Lodestar was a revelation, with a simple set up and a wealth of potential guide stars in almost very star field. Someone has recently offered me a SX Lodestar 2 camera secondhand. My research on the interweb brought up only one direct comparison study of the two versions of these cameras. http://www.astrosurf.com/comolli/strum60.htm Despite the manufacturer's claims, this study found little practical difference between the two models. I decided to try the Lodestar 2 up against my existing Lodestar 1 to see if I drew the same conclusions. First of all I compared how noisy the two cameras were. I took 2 and 10 second darks with both cameras (see picture below). The Lodestar 2 produced a noticeably cleaner image with less noise, less amp low and fewer hot pixels. The difference in hot pixel numbers may simply be down to a possible difference in age of the two cameras. Next I took single 1 second exposures of the same patch of sky (see picture below). The Lodestar 2 was noticeably more sensitive than the Lodestar 1, showing many more faint stars (Pictures have a approx. 90 deg difference in orientation). Conclusions For the examples tested, the Lodestar 2 displayed much less noise and was more noticeably sensitive than the Lodestar 1 camera.
  16. Hi Guys Managed to get some time under the stars last night with the Lodestar-C and my C8 with the F3.3 reducer. I've put a video of the first part of my viewing session up on You Tube: Not the most dynamic video and no audio, but it is a real time capture of my desk top showing how the Lodestar and Lodestar Live perform, especially the real time adjustment of the image. Starts on Polaris then slews to M1, M42, M74 ending on M81. Looking forward to the next release with de-bayer for colour images. Clear skies Paul
  17. DoctorD

    M42 RAW

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 captured with Lodestar-C using Beta version of Lodestar Live INED70 with SCT F6.3 reducer and IR filter No Stretch
  18. DoctorD

    M42

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    C8 F3.3 Lodestar using Starlight Live (15s stack - see image for details)
  19. DoctorD

    M42 Stretch 1

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 captured with Lodestar-C using Beta version of Lodestar Live INED70 with SCT F6.3 reducer and IR filter Stretched showing some nebulosity
  20. DoctorD

    M42

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 - 21 frames at 20s and 27 frames at 5s for the core INED70 with F6.3 reducer operating at about 315mm (F4.5) Lodestar-C OSC Skywatcher Synscan AZ mount IR block filter Processed in Nebulosity 3 Stretched in Photoshop CS2 using multiple curves & overlay the core
  21. DoctorD

    M42 LSL 1

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 captured using Lodestar live with single 20s exposure - image is as viewed live processed only using Lodestar Live to see more of the core.
  22. DoctorD

    M42 Stretch 2

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    M42 captured with Lodestar-C using Beta version of Lodestar Live INED70 with SCT F6.3 reducer and IR filter More Stretch showing extended nebulosity
  23. Starlight Xpress Lodestar guide camera in its original box with original drivers disk and guide cable. Fully working. £220 inc. sign for postage to UK mainland.
  24. DoctorD

    Catalina

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    Catalina reprocessed C8 F3.3 Lodestar taken with StarlightLive 15-01-16
  25. DoctorD

    NGC3190 2016.1.15 22.31.31

    From the album: DoctorD's Photos

    NGC3190 looking toward very light polluted skies Taken with C8 and F3.3 reducer using Starlight Live & Lodestar-C
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.