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Found 6 results

  1. Inspired by the recent Pelican image by @steppenwolf I decided to have a go myself. Since it was near full moon, I decided to use only Ha and checked via CCDNavigator that the object was a sufficient angular distance to allow imaging (for those that might be interested I use the so called Lorentzian "moon avoid" technique developed by the Berkeley Astronomical Department). I was quite impressed by the image details. Alan LIGHTS: 8 x 1800s Ha; DARKS: 30, FLATS:40, BIAS:100 all at -20C.
  2. Here is a telephoto version of these classics that are still visible at my latitude for a few hours. I gathered the Ha data 2 April with my Canon 300mm f/4 and a 12nm clip filter (unmodded Canon 60D, 6 x 25 min) to which I added RGB data from 11 November gathered with my Samyang 135mm f/2 (169 x 1 min). All @ ISO1600. So totally 5.3 hours of data. I think I like the colours but some may think they are a bit over the top. Maybe I should pull back on saturation? C & S most welcome! Cheers
  3. From the album: Deep Sky II

    I've never tried imaging the Pelican Nebula in narrowband before so this was my first attempt. Since it was nearly a full moon I decided to limit the image capture to Ha data. This was also my first image after my recent adjustment of spacing between my field flattener/reducer and CCD (according to CCDInspector, the aspect ratio of my stars is now more consistent which I took to be a good sign). The image is processed via a combination of smartsharpen, noise reduction, unsharp mask, High Pass Filter and HDR toning. I was quite impressed by the HDR toning effect on the lighter parts of the image. I like the overall result, particular the details and the slight 3D effect. LIGHTS: 8 x 1800s Ha; FLATS: 40; BIAS: 100; DARKS: 30 all at -20C.
  4. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    I have just acquired a new (used) telescope (many thanks PhotoGav), A Skywatcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro and I have decided to step up my image processing a notch and have had my first try with PixInsight 1.8. 7+ hours of data over 4 nights with good conditions and a lot of learning have resulted what I would call my first WOW! image. Feeling very proud of this one. Done in narrowband using the Hubble Space Telescope Palette (SII= Red, Hα = Green, OIII = Blue) For more detail the astrobin link is: http://www.astrobin.com/271584/

    © Mark Spruce

  5. The Pelican Nebula is one of my favourite objects although it is often overshadowed by its big neighbour, The North America Nebula. The skies didn't play ball with this one so it took several evenings over a protracted period of time to capture any meaningful data. What I particularly wanted to accentuate in this image was the dust. I have always loved the dust apparently 'falling' from the area where M42 and M43 'touch' and was keen to get a similar affect here with this object. Working with just bi-colour data introduced some challenges but in the end, I did get an image that reflected what I was looking for. The Pelican Nebula is situated to the north-west of the North America Nebula, 2 degrees east south-east of the bright star Deneb in Cygnus. The region is alive with star-birth and evolving gas clouds. As well as the gas and dust, there was another feature that I hoped to probe and that is the Herbig-Haro jets (designated HH-555) emanating from the top of the dust and gas pillar on the 'neck' region of the nebula. These jets indicate the presence of an unseen proto-star and they are indeed visible in this image. Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: William optics FLT98 Reducer: William Optics FR IV Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Guiding: SX LodeStar Filters: Baader 7nm Ha and 8.5mm OIII Subframes: 20 x 600 sec Ha, 37 x mix of 900 and 1200 sec OIII Control: CCD Commander Capture: MaxIm DL Post-Processing: MaxIm DL and PS3
  6. Hello, Here is my version of the Pelican Nebula. Data capture done during several nights from the 14th august to 22nd September 2017. Location, country side one hours drive south of Copenhagen. HA 5nm: 47 x 600 second subs, moon lit nights. OIII 3nm: 29 x 600 second subs, no moon. SQM 21.10 SII 3nm: 37 x 600 second subs, no moon SQM 21.30 Total exposure: 18 hours 50 minutes Calibrated and stacked followed by deconvolve and DPP in Maxim. Layered as Hubble palette and final curves in Photoshop. Reduction of magenta saturation and lightnes to adjust star color in the flattened image. Equipment: Mesu200 mount. 10" Skywatcher Quattro, Atik 460m camera and Astrodon filters. Offaxis guided. Link to full resolution: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-WsltPPgG5JeXFIZnA5d3ZkYmc Thanks for watching.
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