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Found 15 results

  1. So, I am going to take my first steps into observing and hopefully imaging the sun, and get myself a filter for the telescope, just so that I have something to do, when I am working nightshifts, or the weather is bad at night. From what I can see, all I would need is a filter like this one https://www.firstlightoptics.com/solar-filters/astrozap-baader-solar-filter.html. Is that so, or is there anything else that you would highly recommend that I get, and why? My telescope is a Skywatcher 150PDS on a Celestron AVX mount. On the same time, I am looking at buying a baader hydrogen alpha 3mm filter for imaging. Is this also something I could use for observing, or it is solely for imaging? Just curious. Any comments, tips, advice would be very much appreciated, as I would rather not damage either my eyes, or more importantly my equipment! (jk)
  2. Hi again! Last time I imaged IC5070 for approx 3 hours, then as Orion rose up I decide to use up the last of the clear skies imaging B33/NGC2024. 15 x 600s at ISO1600 with Canon 1000d, ED80 FFx0.85, darks and bias. Looking any advise on detail etc, how does guiding look, focus, etc. I'd like to try to progress so feedback welcome. It is still noisy, so definitely need more subs. I've also lost the plot somewhere with it somewhere during processing as there is artefacts all over the show! Thanks in advance Adam.
  3. Pressure Tuning review Hello everyone, I figured I would write down my thoughts on my Lunt LS60 pressure tune retrofit, bear with me though, I am a solar baby and cannot talk the talk as deeply as you seasoned observers. On May 17 of this year I shipped off my Lunt for a pressure tune retrofit, it was originally a tilt tuner, I was always wondering why it had a tuner at all considering the views were great, I was able to see both prominences and disc detail like filaments and so on simultaneously which was great. But the tilt tuner left me feeling like I was missing out after reading about what tuning really meant, by that I mean no matter how much I turned that little wheel back and forth absolutely nothing changed no matter how good seeing was or how steady I kept my gaze, and my eyes are good. Both Lunt and my local telescope shop whom I trust very much upon inspection assured me that it will not be a visible change, the wheel they say was to snap the etalon into band and not so much to tune through different features, on or off band and that was what it's function was I was told. Ok I was ok with that, the views were great so I didn't let it chew away at me, but a small part of me was convinced that my tuning wheel was not working properly, it turned with such ease that a stiff breath would spin it, it just didn't have any resistance at all and it bugged me a bit. I decided to take the hit and ship it off for a retrofit to pressure tuning, the cost would be $500 US plus shipping back and forth, which in Canadian turned out to be $850 all said and done, i purchased the scope for such a great price that I figured why not I'd still be ahead anyway. Off it went, I was nervous knowing pimple faced teen aged warehouse kids would be hurling my scope into and out of trucks, but it arrived safely and the wait was on, Lunt customer service was commendable to say the least, they assured the retrofit would be an improvement and so helpful and informative throughout the whole process. Exactly two months later I received my scope, which was about 3 weeks longer than the time I was quoted but that's ok, the eclipse is around the corner here in north america and Lunt is busier than ever. I must mention that there was an issue with the feather touch focusser when it arrived, it was rough and felt like it had received a hard knock, I contacted Lunt and they offered to send me a standard focusser until after the eclipse because they had no feather touch in stock. I didn't blame them for the focusser, but they were concerned and offered to take action before interrogating me and diverting blame to the shipper and that is a commendable thing, it turns out that after some investigation by me I realized that it was my fault, I recall shipping the scope on its side within the case which left the focuser knob contacting the lid of the case , I remember having to press the lid down a bit too hard. After speaking to starlight, the focuser manufacturer, they said they've seen that before, a knock will misalign the focuser and it clearly was knocked during shipping I managed to fix the focuser after all, now let's hear about the pressure tuning already right! First thing that struck me was the size of the tuning cylinder, it is larger and adds more weight than I imagined, this is great for a good grip on the cylinder (which you'll need!!) I'll get to that later, but it did throw the balance of the scope on my Grand Polaris mount way off, so much so that I was unable to move the clamshell forward enough on the bracket to offset the added weight, if my bracket was another 2 inches longer it would be ok, something I have to consider. One very important factor when switching to pressure tuning is the mount, I'm using a rock solid Vixen GP, oldie but goodie, it's solid as a mountain and smooth as silk, but I'm afraid that anything less would have made for a hard time. Pressure tuning is nowhere near as effortless as turning that little wheel, i can guarantee that if you are planning on mounting one on anything less than a very sturdy mount you may be frustrated, the effort required to turn the wheel is far greater than the force required to turn any focuser. You definitely don't want the sun to look like a dot on an oscilloscope while you're trying to find your tuning preference. I figure I'll describe what pressure tuning is from a mechanical point of view, it is as simple as a cylinder with a piston inside that forces air into a chamber inside the scope. As you thread the cylinder in it pushes air into the chamber surrounding the etalon which in turn physically affects the etalon. I have been enjoying the pressure tuner a lot lately and made sure to give it a fair chance under good seeing conditions, so far it has been a pleasure to use comparing with tilt tuning. It was explained to me that tilt tuning (this is from Lunt) is to snap the etalon into band and not for tuning back and forth during a session, I was sold it was on or off band and that's about it. The pressure tuner right away showed off its superiority, i am now able to finely tune back and forth revealing different features in full detail rather than a happy mid point for all features which is where I was at with tilt tuning. Some people i understand leave their tuning point in one place and don't touch it which is fine, but I greatly enjoyed finely turning that cylinder through its travel, ever so slightly and watching different features reveal themselves in fine detail. Being a noob in solar astronomy I cannot yet get into the hard core jibber jabber behind every features characteristics, I don't yet know if I'm seeing dilithium Crystals emitted from the flux ionic resonations within cavitation nodules but I'll get there lol. One thing I can speak of though is when I turn that cylinder I can actually see its effects whereas before I was unable to exact any meaningful change on the suns disc. One thing I was very curious about was if there would be any banding where certain sections of the disc were in tune while other parts were not, my tilt tuned model had an annoying issue where the best view was to the far right and as the disc moved detail would drop off near center. I understand this is common and can be different in every scope, I am happy to say that the disc pretty evenly detailed across its face, I've carefully watched as I moved the disc side to side looking for bad spots and with the exception of the outer edge I cannot see any detail drop off. I'm glad because Lunt says they can do their best to remedy that but cannot guarantee it won't have banding. I hope this little write up can help others who may be contemplating the same retrofit, one has to ask whether a pricey retrofit is worth the cost, I myself think it was definitely worth it, aside from the advantages of pressure tuning itself I'm sure it's resale value improved a fair bit. I did notice that Lunt did change the serial number sticker on my scope. The serial number changed from 2009920 to 0001392 which kind of gives it a whole new identity I guess, kind of like if Ford restored your car to new condition and even changed the VIN number lol. In conclusion i would advise anyone to pack their cope carefully and make sure your scope is sitting on its belly and not sideways like i did unfortunately, and please do yourself a huge favour and insist on a signature required return from lunt. My scope was left on my front doorstep, big box sitting there just screaming to be taken, i almost lost my mind! and insist than lunt ad a bit more foam around the sides between your scopes metal case and the shipping box not just foam end caps and 2 inches of empty space all around the sides of the box, this is something that kind of upset me, lucky it was ok though. Anyway, if anyone out there has any questions I'll be glad to answer them if I can, thank you for your patience regarding my lack of in depth knowledge.
  4. Last night was the first relatively clear night here for some time so despite the slight mistiness, I had a go at imaging the Wizard Nebula. The classification NGC 7380 really applies to the young star cluster (3.8 million years old!) associated with this nebulous region that lies approximately 7,500 light years away in the constellation of Cepheus. A better classification for the region of nebulosity is SH2-142 from the Sharpless catalogue. The nebulosity responds well to imaging in Ha, OIII and SII so is often displayed in the popular Hubble Palette which, depending on sky conditions in the next few weeks, may well be the direction in which I take this image. NGC 7380 was discovered by Caroline Herschel on 7th August, 1787. Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150 ED Pro Flattener: Sky-Watcher Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Guiding: SX LodeStar Filters: Baader 7nm Ha Subframes: 18 x 1200 sec Ha Control: CCD Commander Capture: MaxIm DL Post-Processing: MaxIm DL and PS3
  5. First time out this year and what a great Sun to start the year with. ED80 + Quark Chromo + ASI120MM 1000 frames stacked to 20% in Autostakkert then sharpened in imppg. False colour via photoshop curves (prefer the mono myself)
  6. Aenima

    ngc7000red ha -

    From the album: CCD venture

    A h-alpha shot of the Wall section of NGC7000 aka north america nebula. ED80 - ATK16HR - Ha clip filter - EQ6 - finderguider 9x50mm PhD2 - photoshop - DSS.

    © 2016JayBird

  7. AlastairW

    IC1805 Heart Nebula

    From the album: Messier and NGC Objects

    IC1805 Skwatcher 130pds ASI1600mm-c (-15) 7nm Baader Ha 10x5min lights No darks, flats or bias
  8. Hey all, I wanted to get some opinions. I'm looking into 2" filters to attach to a Baader MPCC and can't figure out if I should go with UHC, HA (and whether 7nm, 12nm, or something else), or some other form of light pollution filter. Here's the setup... Celestron 8" Newt (hence needing to attach it to the MPCC, which then goes straight into an adapter that I bought that fits the 2" input so I can still get focus). UNmodded Nikon D3100 Aiming for brighter galaxies and nebulae in light polluted skies (I live in NYC but drive out anywhere from 45min to 2.5 hours away. Still polluted of course). Hoping to keep it under $200, so that would rule out some of the Astronomik HA filters. Just generally want to combat light pollution from cities as well as be able to shoot on moonlit nights. And I'd love to get more detail contrast like we all see in HA exposures. I've also read conflicting reports that HA filters are less useful or outright useless on unmodded DLSRs, but there's no consensus. Thoughts? Thanks in advance! - Josh
  9. Hello. I use a Celestron 70mm refracting telescope, with Baader AstroSolar safety film for my solar viewing. I've been doing solar observations and recordings for little over a year now and with the news of the large prominence today I was wondering if the Hydrogen Alpha filters that can be threaded are safe for visual. If they are not, and I get the feeling that they are not, can you double up the filter with the Baader AstroSolar to make viewing safe? I'd love to have a PST but alas, it's a bit to expensive for me at this time. Thanks CQ
  10. A very enjoyable imaging session last night at the Rollrights with Astrosurf (http://stargazerslou...ing-worked-m51/) and while she was muttering to her autoguider I set up my Astrotrac. The wind had died down by now so I thought I would try out my new 300mm lens on the modded Canon 550D, target was the Crescent Nebula in hydrogen alpha and I managed to get 25 usable 4 minute subs within the 2 hour run of the Astrotrac. All processing done in Photoshop and I must say I'm very pleased with this image as a first attempt with this combination. Mel
  11. Hi! I am looking for a couple of filters to use as a version of a Hubble palette on my imaging setup (8" Orion Newtonian Astrograph, Orion Atlas GEM, Orion SSAG, Nikon D3200, and Baader MPCCII). I plan on getting a Hydrogen alpha filter, an oxygen 3 filter, and a sulfur 2. I plan on getting a ccd soon, I know a dedicated sensor array is going to turn out much better results, but first I want to milk every drop out of my nikon. Now, the coma corrector I use with the nikon only accepts two inch filters, unless I were to add an adapter that holds a 1.25 inch filter, such as the blue fireball 2" filter male thread to 1.25" female thread adapter found here: http://agenaastro.com/blue-fireball-m48-male-m28-5-female-adapter-m-01.html . My main question is, will a filter setup like this impede the amount of light reaching the sensor? I would like to buy Orion's 1.25 filter set [ http://www.telescope.com/Orion-125-Extra-Narrowband-Tri-color-CCD-Filter-Set/p/24609.uts ] 1.) because it contains all three of my choices, and 2.) because I know that the 1.25' filters can fit on any imager or telescope to which I currently have access. Let me know if this seems like a decent plan. Thanks a lot! Costas Soler
  12. NGC7000 Mono & BW(North America nebula) in Hydrogen alpha is covering an area of more than four times the size of the full moon.Very bad conditions during shooting, tremendous mist came after 1 hour so instead of 2 hrs it's just one.Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-ProMount: HEQ5Pro Camera: QHY168C Filter Baader 7μm H-alpha Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: Finderscope 9x50 12x300s exposure at -10°C (60 min total) binning 1x1 10xdarks 10xbias 20xflats
  13. AlastairW

    Melotte 15

    From the album: Messier and NGC Objects

    Melotte 15 Skwatcher 130pds ASI1600mm-c (-15) 7nm Baader Ha 10x5min lights No darks, flats or bias
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