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Found 26 results

  1. Hi everyone Ages since I was here. Anyhow the recent Mars-Neptune conjunction on Dec 7 prompted me to try to capture it with my Canon 350D and 300mm lens on a fixed tripod. Both images are stacks of about 10 images with exposure of about 1s. Taken at dusk. Chris
  2. I imaged the conjunction around 17.30hrs GMT with my Startravel and ASI120MC camera on the SLT mount (+fixed wood tripod). The image scale with my C8 would clearly have been too large. The image, processed in Registax6 from 200 frames, is shown below. The image is shown horizontally flipped to match the telescopic view with star diagonal. I puzzled for some time over what exactly I had captured, but the centre dot is Mars (overexposed) the faint dot at lower L is Neptune, and the brighter dot at upper R is the star 81 Aqr. I also took a run which has Mars only slightly overexposed, and looking very small, and inevitably not capturing Neptune.
  3. Another image of the Moon, Venus & Spica yesterday morning. Pentax K5 / PENTAX-DA 12-24mm F4 ED AL [IF] lens @24mm / f9 / iso 1600 / 5 sec exp.
  4. From the album: Canon 200mm f/2.8L

    Three planets visible in the western sky, after sunset. Left is Jupiter, top is Mercury, Venus below. EOS 450D (modded), 1/20, f/3.5, ISO 400, Canon 200m f/2.8L lens.
  5. Venus and Uranus will be in conjunction, less than 4' apart, close enough to fit within a low power telescopic view. It will be a challenge to see Uranus at magnitude 5.9 in the evening twilight. Use Venus as your guide. A great astrophotography event!
  6. Stu

    Moon and Mars Conjunction

    A tricky one to see being very low in the sky just before dawn. At 5am the Moon is at around 15 degrees altitude, with Mars just under 3.5 degrees away Best seen with the naked eye or binoculars
  7. Don't you just love it when planets get together and put on a show? I must admit, it was quite a challenge imaging these two in the same telescopic view at first. I tried my little space cams but Venus was just too bright;"little" Neptune didn't have a chance, lol. So, I decided to first take a wide-field view of the area with my Nikon camera piggybacked to my Mak 127, and then a prime focus shot. Here's the wide-field shot, a single 20s exposure at f/5.6: and here is the prime focus shot, a quick 5 second exposure to keep Venus from being too bright: Enjoy! Reggie
  8. This planetary conjunction forms a triangle with Jupiter(left), Mercury(top) & Venus(right) Pentax 645D Pentax 500mm lens @ f8 Exp. 1/4 sec. ISO 200 26th May 2013 Pentax Digital Camera Utility 4 Conjunction of Jupiter Mercury & Venus 26th May 2013 from Kelso by mikeyscope, on Flickr
  9. Here is some video I shot of the Venus & Mercury conjunction on the same evening I took the image. Watch out for the geese! Regards, Reggie
  10. I haven't checked, but I am sure there are plenty of these around. I thought I would enter my daylight version as it is a little different. I followed the conjunction until it was lost in the glare and behind buildings, all in all a wonderful morning. Handheld at the eyepiece as normal for me using an iPhone 6 Plus. This is the last one I took that still showed all four moons despite it being 7.41am and relatively bright. Normal kit: Scope: Tak FC100DC (this is getting expensive...) Eyepiece: Need to check this! Will update when I have. Probably 12.5mm BGO at x59. Mount: AZGTi on Gitzo tripod Taken using Procam 4 and cropped and processed using PS Express, all on the phone.
  11. From the album: Starchasing

  12. Another early morning conjunction, the Moon will be 15 degrees above the horizon at 5am, with Saturn 4 degrees away and Mars 2.5 degrees from Saturn. A lovely binocular or naked eye sight.
  13. Visible for much of the night until around 4.15am, the closest approach is at around 2.15am when the 76% illuminated Moon will be 2 degrees 36" away from M44, the Beehive Cluster. Best seen in binoculars or a wide field scope.
  14. Another tricky one, being low in the sky just before dawn. At 5am the Moon will be at around 10 degrees altitude, with Saturn close at just over 2 degrees away. Best seen with the naked eye or binoculars
  15. Happy Equinox, everyone! Here is an image of the last quarter moon and Saturn I snapped at dawn, shortly after the spring officially arrived for us in the Northern Hemisphere:
  16. Hi all, before going comet hunting tonight I went and found a nice vantage point to observe tonights conjunction of Venus and Mercury. I believe I read they were around 1degree separated. They look great hanging low in the dusk sky and Mars was also visible higher up and more southerly. I took quite a few images but this 4sec ISO100 shot was my favourite. IMG_5654.cr2.tif https://www.flickr.com/photos/116958085@N07/16246201211/
  17. Visible from around 1am, the Moon is at it's highest around 4.20am when the separation is around 3.5 degrees. They continue to get closer as they are lost in daytime, being at 3 degrees 28" at 6am. Best seen with the naked eye or binoculars
  18. From the album: Starchasing

    Beautiful conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. Venus is the brighter of the two celestial objects.
  19. Fermenter

    Harlem Planets

    From the album: Astrophotography

    This is an old photo shot with my 40D in 2012. This is from my fire escape in Harlem, Manhattan, March 2012 of the conjunction of Jupiter & Venus on the night of their closest approach when they were only 3 degrees apart in the sky. Just goes to show that you can do astrophotography even in the most light polluted of locations. Here is a celestial event as seen from "the city that never sleeps." Don't let you location get in the way of appreciating the night sky. ISO 1600 1/4s f/4.5 18mm

    © Charles Duffney

  20. From the album: Starchasing

    Beautiful conjunction of Mars (top), the waxing crescent moon (bottom left) and Venus (bottom right)
  21. Another tricky low one, but certainly viewable. At 5am Mars will be 10 degrees above the horizon, with Saturn only 1 degree 17" away. Best seen with binoculars or naked eye, telescopic views will likely be poor due to the low altitude.
  22. Here are some more images I took of the Venus/Uranus conjunction in addition to the one already posted. And to think, I was wondering what that pesky star was above Venus! Reggie
  23. Here is a single two-second exposure of the close conjunction of Venus (the brighter object on the left) and Uranus (the fainter, bluish-green object to the right) at ISO 1600. It is a prime focus image taken through my 127mm Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope about an hour after sunset. A striking pair visible in a telescopic view! Reggie
  24. Taken from my home in Tenerife on morning 8 Oct
  25. From the Malvern Ridge near Black Hill this morning. These are with 100-400L on Canon 7D. Had no luck closer in with the camera attached to an ETX90 tube. Too low / distorted for any Jupiter detail, but can just make out a couple of satellites here.
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