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Found 18 results

  1. Reprocessed to try to better balance the colours ... (previous version: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/239687-eta-carinae-nebula/ )
  2. 6th December 2015 Equipment: NexStar 8SE Time: 01:00 - 03:45 During the imaging of Barnard33 through the OIII filter using the 80mm refractor, I setup the 8SE on the single arm alt-az mount for observing. Orion Nebula looked great and bright through just the eyepiece but when using the UHC filter it was detailed and awesome. The shape of the nebula was clearly visible, the fishes mouth and the mustache shaped extends were very distinctly brighter than the reminder of the nebula. There was a lot of the nebulosity visible starting to take on the shape of the "flame" as photographed except it was more rounded. The four stars in the trapezium were bright and distinct. The second object I was looking for to observe was the globular cluster 47Toucana. When I located, it was not in the database of the NexStar 8SE hand controller (atleast not as 47Toucana), it looked dimmer that I was expecting. I spend a bit of time looking at the globular through both the 40mm eye piece and the 11mm Nagler... Both showed a dim image of the globular. Through the 11mm I did see some granulation and irregularly speckled stars extending out from the core. I did a "identify object" scan on the hand controller and it come up as NGC362 and the next nearest object was NGC265 in the list. Looking up the objects NGC362 is magnitude 8 and 47Toucana NGC104 is magnitude 5.8. Both of these objects should be a lot brighter in the eyepiece than the object I was observing and struggling, just barely resolving stars around the globular. That point brings me to the next nearest object, NGC265. In StarWalk it's shown to be magnitude 12.5 and when squinting and de focussing my vision on the shown picture it definitely resembles the shape, brighter/denser core and speckled stars at the outer edges. It also makes a lot more sense for it to be so dim in the FOV when looking at it through a telescope with a maximum resolving power of magnitude 14.5. So I think I was actually looking at NGC265, and not 47Tucana or NGC362. The reason why the catalog on the NS8 hand controller shown NGC362 as a first choice if because the object was manually found after locating the constellation Toucana, the three objects are close together, the NS8 has very little objects in this part of the sky in the database and the star alignment might have been a few degrees off. The reason I didn't look up the data and thought the NGC362 was the Globular cluster 47Toucana is because I didn't want to turn on the iPhone or the iPad and destroy my night adapted vision...REMINDER: GET RED FILM FOR IPHONE AND IPAD. 47Toucana needs to be looked for and observed another night.... So does NGC362 for that matter and compare to NGC265 to confirm the above theory. The next object I wanted to find and observe for the first time was the Horsehead nebula. Reading others observation about the Horsehead, some claim to have spotted it in 4" refractors from dark skies, I though that I might have a chance from my semi dark location. I located Alnitak and looked for any hint of the Horsehead or Flame nebulae with no luck, than I spend a few minutes looking for the nebulae using UHC and OIII filters with no luck. I rushed a bit using the UHC and OIII since it's commonly documented that a h-beta filter is the best filter to spot it. Through the h-beta filter Alnitak was still quite bright but the background was a lot darker, but I still couldn't spot either the Flame or the Horsehead nebulae. I've spend a fair bit of time looking for it through both the 40mm and 11mm eyepieces but at the end before I gave up I still couldn't spot any of them. When I brought my head up and looked at the sky toward Orion's Belt, it was quite obvious that my sight was quite dark adapted since the sky was glowing, it was almost milky bright... I put not seeing the Horsehead nebula down to the sky glow being much too bright for it to come through. The hunt will need to continue another night. The last object I observed was The Carina Nebula. As previously the Carina nebula is a sight to behold, it is definitely my favorite nebula to observe along with the Orion Nebula. It looks stunning through the UHC filter and 11mm eyepiece, the detail in the brightest arm was visible clearly, although not as defined as the last time I looked at it, but close. Through the 40mm eyepiece and the f6.3 focal reducer, there was a lot of the nebula visible in the FOV. Not only the brightest arm, but also the other two features that starts to make the "storm trooper face" shape. This is another object that I always spend a considerable time observing through various magnifications. Both the Orion and Carina nebulae have a slight blue-gray color look to them through the UHC filter which gives it a almost painted appearance. Tonight I was not going to get stopped by dew like last time I was observing so I ran a RCA loom from the CGEM and through a gender changer connected the 8SE dew heater strap, seems to have done the trick since there was no dewing of the optics. The seeing was quite still tonight but as dark adaption revealed, the sky glow was quite bright. Toward the end of the observing session some thin cloud patches were coming and going, not interfering with the imaging. Tonight was definitely a great night of observing. MG
  3. Hello again everyone, Just sharing my latest DSO imaging result... The Carina Nebula, NGC3372. The color image is true color RGB, 4 hours worth of ISO400 7.5 minute subs and the mono image is 4 hours of 20 minute ISO400 subs taken through a 7nm Ha filter using a modded Canon 40D. Thanks for looking. MG
  4. Carina Nebula with the bright unstable star Eta Carinae in the centre of the image. edit ( 27 March ): Tweak to shadow levels to bring out more detail and also a slight reduction in the brightness of the highlights. A much larger version ( 4562 x 3072 6062 x 4082) is available on my Flickr page. previous version: Carinae Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) From Wikipedia ... "Eta Carinae is a highly luminous hypergiant star. Estimates of its mass range from 100 to 150 times the mass of the Sun, and its luminosity is about four million times that of the Sun." This HDR image is constructed from 12 sets of exposures ranging from 1/8 sec ( to capture the bright centre of Eta Carinae ) through to 240 seconds. Total exposure time around 13 hours 17-19 March 2018 Image details: Objects in image: Hypergiant, Eta Carinae ( HD 93308 ) in the centre of the Homunculus Nebula Carina Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) Keyhole Nebula Open Star Clusters: - Trumpler 14, 15, 16 - Collinder 232 Field of view ..... 59' 18.2" x 39' 56.0" Image centre ...... RA: 10 45 01.762 Dec: -59 40 52.87 Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 17, 18 & 19 March 2018 ): 12 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8s to 240s ) all at ISO250. ( 181 x 240sec + 10 to 20 each for the other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 12 sets HDR combination Pixinsight March 2018
  5. Open star clusters Trumpler 14 & 16 and Collinder 232 with the Carina Nebula a very colourful backdrop Eta Carinae and star clusters Trumpler 14 & 16 and Collinder 232 ( please click / tap on image to see larger ( 1632 x 1632 ) and sharper image ) The stand out member of Trumpler 16 is the unstable hypergiant Eta Carina ( just to the left of the Keyhole Nebula ). A larger ( 3264 x 3264 ) version of this image can be found on my Flickr page. Capture and processing details can be found in this post.
  6. Greeting Astrolings, I'm currently in the process of imaging "the pencil" Nebula, but seeing that it's not clearing my obsy roof until past midnight, I didn't want to waste half of clear nights (since they're rare) so before continuing on the pencil, I did a random frame up on eta Carina and used a random star that popped up in the OAG FOV. I ended up doing this over a couple of nights but last night I had a bout of cloud cover for about an hour... and the Nebula drifted. PHD moved the mount looking for a guide star locking in on some noise and attempting to move it to the guide position. What resulted was, when the clouds passed and a guide star popped up, PHD grabbed it and continued imaging, except that the framing moved 2/3 of the way down... and I ended up with subs for the bottom part of eta Carina. I had plenty of subs from the previous night of the top part, so I created this mosaic... Talk about a accidental 2 pane mosaic!!! Accidently created my first DSO mosaic. This consists of 24 x 300s (top half) and 18 x 300s (bottom half) ISO400 using the modded 40D at the 8SE native focal length of 2032mm. Clear skies. MG
  7. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) ......... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 14 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/30th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 22 x 240sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 14 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  8. Eta Carinae Nebula ( NGC 3373 )with the bright unstable star Eta Carinae in the centre of the image. This is still a WIP - I am capturing more data tonight and the processing needs tweaking ... Edit: A quick and dirty adjustment on my ipad ( the original is too green I think ) ............. Original: From Wikipedia ... "Eta Carinae is a highly luminous hypergiant star. Estimates of its mass range from 100 to 150 times the mass of the Sun, and its luminosity is about four million times that of the Sun." This HDR image is constructed from 12 sets of exposures ranging from 1/8 sec ( to capture the bright centre of Eta Carinae ) through to 240 seconds. Total exposure time around 9 hours. 17-19 March 2018 I am surprised at how bright the colours came out; the stretch was performed with multiple applications of "marskedStretch" and that usually results in subdued colours and I have not touched the saturation ( this is just how it came out following the stretch and brightness adjustment with curves ). ps. is it "Eta Carina" or "Eta Carinae" ?
  9. The Southern Beehive Cluster ( NGC 2516 ) in the constellation Carina - by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ). Because of its similarity to the “The Beehive Cluster” ( catalogued as M44 by Messier ), NGC 2516, which is only visible from lower latitudes, has become known as the “Southern Beehive Cluster”. At a distance of around 1300 light years, NGC 2516 is relatively close to us and resides in the same spiral arm of the Milkyway as we do. Containing around 100 stars, with a number of them in the magnitude 5 to 6 range, NGC 2516 has an apparent magnitude of 3.8 and is visible to the naked eye as a small bright hazy patch at the edge of the Milkyway. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: centre of image: RA 7h 58.4m, Dec -60 deg 41.9' (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arc min): 78.9 x 52.6 Scale of image: 2.18 arcsec / pixel Up direction in image is North Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2 guiding RA only Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 light pollution filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Long exposure noise reduction on Stack of 14 x 360sec images @ ISO400 Pixinsight. Taken from the Blue Mountains above Sydney Australia over two nights: 29th and 30th March 2016
  10. The Wishing Well Cluster ( NGC 3532 ) in the consetllation Carina ( click on image to see full size / best resolution ) This large bright open cluster, when seen through a small telescope, looks like a collection of brightly gleaming silver coins shimmering at the bottom of a wishing well and hence the name. First recorded in 1752 by Nicolas Lacaille, NGC 3532 contains around 120 stars superimposed on the expanse of the Milkyway and is visible with the naked eye from lower latitudes. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Co-ordinates: ~ RA 11h 6.4m, Dec -58 deg 50.5' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 Light Pollution Filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90 36 subs ranging from 30 sec 300 sec ISO 200 Pixinsight & Photoshop 10th April 2016 re-processed to increase colour saturation.
  11. The Wishing Well Cluster ( NGC 3532 ) in the constellation Carina ( click on image to see full size / best resolution ) This large bright open cluster, when seen through a small telescope, looks like a collection of brightly gleaming silver coins shimmering at the bottom of a wishing well and hence the name. First recorded in 1752 by Nicolas Lacaille, NGC 3532 contains around 120 stars superimposed on the expanse of the Milkyway and is visible with the naked eye from lower latitudes. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Co-ordinates: ~ RA 11h 6.4m, Dec -58 deg 50.5' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 Light Pollution Filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90 36 subs ranging from 30 sec 300 sec ISO 200 Pixinsight & Photoshop 10th April 2016
  12. The Southern Beehive Cluster ( NGC 2516 ) in the constellation Carina re-processed ( improved colour balance, more colour in the smaller stars and lower saturation overall ): previous version: ( click on image to see larger ) Because of its similarity M44, NGC 2516, which is only visible from lower latitudes, has become known as the Southern Beehive Cluster. At a distance of around 1300 light years, NGC 2516 is relatively close to us and resides in the same spiral arm of the Milkyway as we do. Containing around 100 stars, with a number of them in the magnitude 5 to 6 range, NGC 2516 has an apparent magnitude of 3.8 and is visible to the naked eye as a small bright hazy patch at the edge of the Milkyway. Details: RA 7h 58.4m, Dec -60 deg 41.9' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2, guiding RA only Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector. Hutech IDAS D1 light pollution filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Long exposure noise reduction on Stack of 14 x 360sec images @ ISO400 Pixinsight
  13. Astrophotography Scrapbook Vol. 1 Cover Page Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 8, NGC 6523 ) The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) War and Peace in Scorpius ( NGC 6357 ) Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744 in Pavo Ptolemy's Cluster in Scorpius ( Messier 7, NGC 6475 ) A Million Stars in the Deep South ( NGC 104, 47 Tucanae ) A Wishing Well in Carina ( NGC 3532 ) A Beehive in the Southern Sky ( NGC 2516 ) The Sliver Coin in Sculptor ( NGC 253 ) The Great Nebula in Orion ( Messier 42, NGC 1976 ) A Cluster of Pearls in Centaurus ( NGC 3766 ) - new 5 Dec resources: Scrapbook Template ------------------------------------- When I show my astrophotography images to my friends and family they invariably want to know what they are looking at. This led me to wonder if there was a way I could display my images on a single page together with a few notes on the target object as well as few technical details of the capture for those who might be interested. What I came up with a "scrapbook" like page that combines all of these three elements in a single PDF sheet ( or jpeg image) that ultimately I might combine together to form a PDF book that I can share online or send to friends and family. In the meantime, I thought I might post in this thread each page of my work-in-progress towards volume 1 of my Astrophotography Scrapbook. Any and all comments, observations, suggestions and constructive criticisms will be warmly received. Cheers Mike ps. The pages have been sized to fit full screen on an IPAD
  14. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades open star cluster ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Image details can be found here.
  15. 7th November 2015 Equipment: Olympus 10x50mm DPS-I on tripod (6 degree FOV) Time: 02:40-04:00 Orion's Sword: Orion Nebula was glowing quite brightly. There was hints of nebulosity around the Running Man and the stars very crisp points of light. Rosette central cluster was obvious, I thought I saw a very faint haze around it, but it was so dim that it was most likely wishful thinking. Pleiades very crisp and looked great. Through the crispness there was a very slight shimmer/twinkle to the stars. It was a great view, something that definitely needs the stability of a tripod to see. Jewel Box cluster was quite small but about 6 individual stars and a V shape was clearly visible. Alpha Cruxis was visible as double star. The bright primary was not resolvable as two. Cluster at the other side of Crux from the Jewel Box, easterly from the Carina Nebula there was a dense star field, definitely worth putting a camera on it to see if there is any nebulosity there. There was a distinct orange star among the star field, much brighter and orange than any of the other stars around. Initially I thought it looked out of place and reminded me of the supernova spotted in Sagittarius through the binoculars on 20 March 2015 @ 3:42am AEDT (16:42UT). The dense star field was approximately 1 degree in size so will most likely need to be imaged at 500mm f6.25 to get whole object into frame. Carina Nebula was nicely visible, the dark V shape dust lane... or A as it was orientated tonight, was clearly visible among shimmering stars and nebulous haze. As a note there was a star cluster in or near Canis Major to look into. The Olympus DPS-I 10x50mm binoculars are great, clear and sharp for astronomical observing, there is slight distortion to the extreme edges of the FOV but nothing that bothered me at all. It was a great night of binocular observing. MG
  16. Hi all I finally had a few hours without clouds and managed to capture Eta Carinae before having to turn in at a reasonable time on a work night. The sky was clear of clouds but the high humidity we have been having had a big impact on seeing and on the reflection of the lights from the nearby town. I also captured some shorter subs with the aim of 'filling in' the burnt out stars but I struggled to get acceptable results. The image below is just from the 2 min subs. NGC 3372 Eta Carinae Nebula (RA 10:44:22.47 - Dec -59 56' 36.5"). Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT (on Pier) Orion auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S (Nebula) filter, Nikon D5300 (unmodified), Long Exp Noise Reduction on, 12bit NEF, UHC-S 15 x 120 sec ISO800. PixInsight & Photoshop 19 March 15
  17. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Image of the Carina nebula, imaged in (HaR)GB. This image consists of 4 hours of 20 minutes subs at ISO400 of HAlpha and about 1 hour each of 5 & 10 minute subs in RGB, ISO400. Image was taken with a 80mm refractor at 500mm FL.
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