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Found 18 results

  1. Hi All, After a 8 month break due to moving I finally had a chance to do some simple Deep Space imaging. This image is of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Megallenic Cloud (NCG2070). This is imaged using my modded Canon 40D at F10 2032mm using a Nexstar 8SE on a CGEM mount. The image consists of 12 x 5 min subs, 5 x 10 min subs and 10 x 1 min subs, all in RGB through a IR Cut filter. Currently I'm working on using the PEC feature on the CGEM, and after I've spent a few hours before trying to work out how it works... when it got to past midnight, I was ready to call it a night but decided to frame up on the Tarantula and give it a go... I thought it's not to shabby for a quickie, so I'm sharing it. As far as PEC goes, next time I get to do some astro, I should have NexRemote, PECTools and PHD to give me a average PEC training from 10 cycles... hopefully it'll improve the guiding accuracy and hence detail in my 2000mm imaging close up images. Thank for looking, Mariusz
  2. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    While waiting for the Tarantula to get into imaging position to grab some Ha and OIII subs to add to the previous posted image, I decided to do a quick 47Tuc image. Unfortunately when centered, there was no guide star in the OAG at the current setup, and I did not want to alter the position of the OAG since it was still setup from a previous session to continue on NGC2070... so some unguided subs of the glob had to suffice... it's only 15 x 60sec, 15 x 30sec and 15 x 10sec subs in ISO800 at F10 using the modded Canon 40D. Seeing wasn't the best but surprisingly being unguided the stars were round, fat but round... I guess it's only 60 seconds at longest sub and PA was quite accurate.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  3. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a 7 hour exposure of the M74 galaxy using a astro full specturm modded Canon 40D DSLR through a IR Cut filter. The image is taken with a Celestron 8" SCT at F6.3 through a focal reducer(1280mm focal length). The image consists of mostly 450s subs and approximately 1 hours of 120s subs, all at ISO 800. This galaxy is located at about 30 Million Light years distance from us, at for a magnitude 10 object it did seem like quite a faint object to image, this could be due to the it's low altitude throughout the whole exposure and a little bit of city light pollution in that part of the sky.
  4. Halloween Observation Night Date: 31 October/ 01 November 2016 @ 22:30-01:00AEDT Location: Robertson Equipment: Celestron 8SE on CGEM, Televue 31mm Nagler Type-5, 17mm Ethos, 2X 2" Powermate, Astronomik UHC Filter I finally had a clear moonless night of observation, it just happened to be on Halloween night. I was looking for a new spot in the mountains where I could setup and a couple of months ago I came across a nice little oval miles away from the city and light sources so I was hanging to check it out. When we arrived, there were people having a BBQ and playing tennis with all of the court lights on, this was a bit of a bummer but I figured that they won't be forever and eventually we'll have a clear night of viewing, they left just after 22:30. Once they left and lights were off we had some nice views of 47Tuc, Tarantula Nebula area, Orion Nebula, The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC362 Globular Cluster, The Helix Nebula, an Open cluster in the south near/around Theta Carnia, Uranus and Neptune. 47Tuc: The globular cluster clearly stood out with its millions of glistening stars becoming denser toward the core. As I was observing the cluster in the 17mm Ethos, a slow moving and bright satellite flew past it. Those views are an event that makes a already great view even better. The view of 47Tuc were all awesome using both 31mm Nagler and 17mm Ethos with and without the 2X powermate. NGC362: This globular was a lot smaller and fainter than 47Tuc but still had a lot of individual stars all around it and individual stars visible within the core. Not as impressive as 47Tuc but still a nice view through the 17mm Ethos that's very easy to see with direct vision. NGC 2070: The Tarantula Nebula was a very nice view in all powers. The loops around a obviously brighter tentacular center were faintly visible, especially when observing it using the averted method. I started the viewing using the 17mm ethos through which I saw a fair bit of detail on a quite big tarantula nebula in the eyepiece. The surprising view was when I had a look at it through the 31mm T5 Nagler. The FOV was large enough and magnification low enough for being able to position the Tarantula in left lower with nebulosity amongst hundreds of stars to the right visible where a bit of the large Magellanic cloud was coming into the FOV. There was some fuzziness and nebulosity above it, I thought what a great view, this would make a great photo. The view of the tarantula system through the Nagler was amazing, I saw nebulosity, hundreds of stars and it was all easy to see. M42/43/Running Man: Orion Nebula was a bit of a disappointment. Granted that I was waiting for the Orion nebula to come above the trees and it was not very high in the sky at the time, but I am comparing it to the view I had in the past. The shape was visible, with the trapezium clearly visible with the stars being very stable and sharp points of light, so I figured that the seeing was good, so why do I not see more detail in Orion Nebula? I saw way more nebula and detail in the past. I added the UHC filter in the eyepiece and sure it faded the stars but it did not bring out more detail like it did before, actually it made the view worse! Using both the Nagler and Ethos, in both magnifications the nebulosity was not as defined and clear as in the past but definitely there. M43 was not as defined as I saw from the dam at the start of the year, back then the "comma" shape was clearly visible and even detail visible with in it, not tonight, I was struggling to see the comma shape. The Running Man was nearly visible, I actually think that at times I saw the running man shape, about as good as I remember seeing it at the beginning of the year, so seeing was (most likely) good so why am I not seeing the nebula like before? I started to investigate. First I checked to make sure that the corrector plate was not fogged over, it was not, that I removed the real cell filter in the back of the scope on the visual back thread, thinking that maybe it takes away from the view. When comparing with and without it, I saw no difference, even suspected the dew shield perhaps causing some kind of a slight blockage and compared with and with out it, no difference, finally I re-collimated the mirrors, they were slightly out, but after collimation it again made no difference. I put it down to a combination of Orion nebula being too low in the sky just above the trees and in the direction of the city. Here I'll mention that the sky did seem quite bright, I thought that maybe my eyes were dark adapted and it seemed like it but maybe not, more on this later with my experience when I was packing up for the night. I guess I have no choice than to try again and see if a darker/more transparent sky will make a difference next observing session. NGC253: The Sculptor Galaxy was relatively easy to see, whether inverted or direct vision I could see a brighter center in a squashed oval, cigar, shape. Occasionally I think I saw some darker "cracks" through the brighter core along with 3 to 5 faint stars glistening within the elongated shape. Sculptor is big in the FOV so I kept it on the 31mm Nagler, the Ethos did not make the view any better or easier to see. I could see the galaxy clearer the more I looked at it and feel like I didn't spend enough time looking at it. NCG7293: The Helix Nebula was a faint but a big ghostly smoke ring in the 31mm Nagler. It is very faint but the smokey ring can be made out using averted vision, or slowly moving the view with the keypad set to "3". I could make out the central neutron star, very small and faint but definitely there. Next time I observe this object I'll have to try looking at it through various filters instead of just bare, maybe more will be visible. Southern open star cluster: visible with eye as fuzzy patch closer to a dust cloud rather than stars but in binoculars and in the scope was visible as heaps of scattered stars, Looking at a star map it seems to be the cluster around Theta Carina. Looked like hundreds of pin point stars were spilled into the FOV. Quite a nice view, no nebulosity visible within its vicinity. Uranus: It is a pale greenish tiny disc that's discernible from the stars around it due to its color and a little disc as opposed to a point of light, I saw no moons. Neptune: Neptune was a pale tiny grey-blueish disc barely bigger then the two stars next to it. As with Uranus, I didn't spend much time on it since there's no hope of seeing any more detail. As a last object due to its late rising this time of the year, I wanted to see the rosette but it wasn't above the trees by 01:00 when we left. Still I found it in the eyepiece and identified the 7 stars located in the center making a rhomboid shape. I read online that this nebula is one where a UHC filter really makes it stand out, so I had to try it. The center stars were still behind tree tops and sad to say that with and without the UHC filter I did not spot any nebulosity. This object will have to wait a couple of months for a darker night and when it's higher in the sky. The 31mm Nagler, 17mm ethos, 2" 2X Powermate and the Astronomik 2" UHC filter is all we took... Honestly you don't need any more than this to observe using a 8" SCT. This combination covered various magnifications and limited fumbling around in the dark for eyepieces or filters allowing more time at the eyepiece. We had some great views tonight and I can't wait to be in a dark site when the seeing is even darker with less or no sky glow. Surprisingly the Astronomik UHC made the views worse on all occasions. Not like the Lumicon that gave me the wow views on the past, unfortunately the Carina Nebula was below the horizon so I couldn't test on it, the Carina is really breathtaking through the Lumicon UHC. Next time I'm going to compare the Astronomik 2" to the Lumicon 1.25" which I didn't have with me, I'm hoping that it was just the seeing otherwise I'll eBay it and get the 2" Lumicon. Another combination I want to try the 2" TVs with is through the f6.8 reducer. It seemed like there was heaps of skyglow. We made sure that we were in total darkness, no lights except purely red lights. Yes lots of objects and stars were visible, more than from home but when we were packing up when I turned on the car head lights and we were hit by white light destroying our night adaptation. After we were packed up, I turned off the head lights and I looked up and to my surprise the sight was similar to "dark adapted" eyes!!! Perhaps it was a night of bad seeing after all, which would explain the lack of nebulosity and detail within. The skyglow was obviously quite severe and it wasn't the best I've seen in a dark site, but still an awesome night of observing, leaving me with a hunger for more. Thanks for reading, clear skies, Mariusz
  5. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a 10 hour exposure of the NGC1055 galaxy using a standard Canon DSLR. The image is taken with a Celestron 8" SCT at F10 (2032mm focal length). The image consists of mostly 600s subs and approximately 2 hours of 90-150s subs, all at ISO 800. This galaxy is located at about 60 Million Light years distance from us, and at a magnitude of 12.5 is quite a faint object to image, especially when there is a little bit of light pollution with in the par of the sky it is imaged at... Looking at the result, I probably should have used the f6.3 FR to have less over sampling and most likely capturing more light in the same amount of time, or same amount in less time... end result most probably, at worst, would have been the same if not very similar and at best there might have been a bit more detail captured since guiding at 63% of the focal length and not oversamplig the subs would not be as susceptible to seeing/star fluctuations/movement.
  6. From the album: Solar System Objects

    Full moon taken with a canon 40D single shots in two parts than combined the two halves in PS.
  7. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a RGB image of the Tarantula Nebula taken with a 8" SCT at 2000mm. 12 x 5 mins Subs 5 x 10 mins subs 10 x 1 min subs all at ISO800
  8. MarsG76

    IC434 Nov2017

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This has been imaged through the NexStar 8SE on the CGEM mount. This was imaged in the native 2032mm focal length (F10) through a Baader UV/IR Cut and Halpha 7nm filters and recorded by my modded Canon 40D DSLR. I experimented with trying to capture some UV data through the Astrodon UV filter but it was a failure on the horsehead... I talked about it in another post, but I think that stacking the UV data into the rest pulled the stars back to white from the redness caused by the HAlpha data. I used PHD 2.6.4 to Autoguide for the first time and I have to say that I like PHD 2 a lot, highly recommended... it is very good, my guiding accuracy (according to PHD2) was between 0.5" and 0.8" arc sec... I found it easy to get to grips with. Total data amount was 81 subs, 75 used in this image... HII: 29 x 15 minute ISO1600 RGB: 13 x 10 minute and 25 x 5 minute ISO800 UV: 8 x 20 minute ISO3200 So total time spent on integration was 850 minutes

    © Mariusz Goralski

  9. MarsG76

    IC434 Nov2017 Crop

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is a cropped image of the other Horsehead image which I imaged through the NexStar 8SE on the CGEM mount in the native 2032mm focal length and recorded by my modded Canon 40D DSLR. Total data amount was 75 used in this image... HII: 29 x 15 minute ISO1600 RGB: 13 x 10 minute and 25 x 5 minute ISO800 UV: 8 x 20 minute ISO3200 So total time spent on integration was 850 minutes

    © Mariusz Goralski

  10. Hi All, I came across the knowledge of NGC1055 galaxy in Cetus by accident while looking at some Hubble images and thought that this Galaxy was possibly a rarely imaged object since I didn't see any images posted of it. Googling this galaxy there are a few amateur images, but still not as many as other galaxies or objects and seems very unpopular. This galaxy was not in my "Star Walk" app so I thought that perhaps its not in the simpler star map programs that people use? or due to the fat that it is quite faint... it is in Cartes Du Ciel and Star Map HD. Enough of my google babble, tech specs time... this was imaged using my NexStar 8SE on the CGEM mount at F10 (2032mm) through my unmodded DSLRs. I initially started imaging the galaxy using my Canon 7D to try to get a higher resolution but realised that the 7D is not only as sensitive as my 40D, modded or unmodded, but a 600 second sub heated up the sensor to 43 degrees as reported by APT. Surely this would generate more noise but I decided to allow the rest of this and next night to image using the 7D. I was curious about the difference between the sub quality between my 40D and 7D so I changed the DSLR used to the stock 40D and the difference was staggering... the 40D only heated up to 21-23 degrees, there was more of the galaxy visible in the 600 second sub but the subs had a noticeable less noise. Each night conditions were very similar, seeing, temperature etc, so I figure that the reason for higher sensitivity was the fact that the 40D has physically bigger pixels and so more photos hit each of the receptors... Total Exposure time was: 57 x 600 sec subs (20 subs through the 7D and 37 subs on the 40D) 23 x 150 sec subs (all 40D) 12 x 60 sec subs (all 40D) The galaxy was mid height in my northern sky and I always started imaging 10-15 degrees east of the meridian until sunrise, so I only really had about 3 hours per night of imaging it before the galaxy was obscured... that includes finding the guide star, calibrating and start the process which took about 30 minutes. It's not anywhere near the hubble image or most of the amateur images but I hope you like it, thanks for looking...
  11. Hi All, When I was waiting for the Tarantula to get into imaging position to grab som Ha and OIII subs to add to the posted image, I decided to do some unguided subs of 47Tuc glob... its only 15 x 60sec, 15 x 30sec and 15 x 10sec subs in ISO800 at F10 using a modded Canon 40D. Seeing wasn't the best but surprisingly the stars were round for being unguided. Thanks for looking, Mariusz
  12. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This is the first Saturn imaged since I moved. Seeing was above average, but not the best I have ever experienced. The most I could manage decent data is through a 2X barlow max.. 3X was staring to go a little soft. Imaged using Imaging Source 21au618 using standard R, G & B filters and a IR Cut filter through the 8SE on 29th May 2016. 3000 frames IR Cut Luma. 2000 frames R & G filters. 750 frames B filter. Used best 25% frames. Color balanced in PS.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  13. I started observing through my Celestron Nexstar 8 SE on August 18th 2017 at about 9pm I couldn't get the skyalign to work and just a little teeny bit frustrated with the cloudy skies and view limited by my own four story building, I looked up, saw Saturn bright and yellow in the sky and manually slewed towards it. And sure enough, when I looked into the eyepiece, I saw Saturn in my FOV. So, while I thought of myself as an armchair astronomer, I may have been a naked eye astronomer all along. A short Observing Report from 1973: I was introduced to Yes, Pink Floyd, and and Led Zepplin, Photography, and Saturn all in the same year by my uncle who was the sound/light guy in a local rock band in 1973. The same year he bought a telescope kit from Edmund Scientific. A Newtonian about 6 feet long and with an aperture of 6 inches. We were in the Mississippi Valley and our altitude there is 690 feet above sea level. The seeing was not bad as I recall. I don't remeber it "swimming" as I call it now. It was sometime in August or September I believe. There were still leaves on the trees, and my grandmothers back yard had a very limited view of the sky. Nearly at the zenith with a slot descending to the horizon almost. You couldn't see below about 15 degrees as I recall. I recall Saturn that evening displaying clear rings, the Cassini division was barely visible, just a darkness rather than a continuous yellow band around the planet. And the planet itself was a mostly featureless ball of yellow. I recall seeing no planets. ~ slight post topic excursion number two ~ Since then I have followed my inclinations, become a teacher, composer, and performer of music, an amateur photographer, and an amateur astronomer (haven't dropped down the rabbit hole of AP quite yet, but it's gaping abyss is looking my way now...). I could never stop reading about astrophysics, cosmology, and astronomy the entire time between then and now. I frequently will think of an object and look it up to find it's in the southern celestial hemisphere. So, after a couple weeks of reading this forum and CN, and AF, I felt ready to make my purchase. I'm still quite happy with the direction I went, although I'm definitely looking at an ultra-light traveldob at 12 to 16 inch Dob (non-GOTO) as my next telescope. I love DSO hunting. But my back is not the greatest, and so I have to think of it thus the lighter option of a 203mm SCT. But I've just found a very nice light weight Dob by Hubble Optics, among others, so once I get a car, I will probably be getting at least a 12 inch Dobsonian soon after. ~/slight post topic excursion number two~ With my 8SE I have seen three planets around Saturn so far. Following that event I just looked at the sky for two weeks before I decided to record all my observations and keep that data in a spread sheet. Here is a link to that spreadsheet I keep on google docs if you'd like to see the list of objects I've gazed upon: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1wSgY9XWA_BcUa1l7nnmJME3D3KwghHhxr4npSz3wS20/edit?usp=sharing here's the list from 08/19/17 to 10/18/17 Object Constellation cat & # Messier # Date Time Observation Notes Saturn 08/19/2017 9:00pm MDT I could see Saturn, rings, Cassini division, and three moons I was unable to get the computer aligned. Too cloudy. I saw Saturn aimed the scope at it and sure enough, Saturn was in the eyepiece! Globular Cluster Pegasus NGC 7078 M15 08/28/2017 22:07 Faint fuzzy ball of light averted vision using the 13mm revealed individual stars and granularity Double Double, Epsilon Lyrae Lyra SAO 067310 08/30/2017 22:25 I see four bright and white blueish stars Oh wow, the pair to the north is stacked while the pair towards the south are side by side. Andromeda Gaslaxy Andromeda NGC 224 M31 08/30/2017 21:46 Big fuzzy blob tilted to one side, can't really see any dust lanes. did not have to use averted vision Zeta1 Lyrae, Zeta2 Lyrae Lyra SAO 067321 08/30/2017 Ring Nebula Lyra NGC 6720 M57 08/30/2017 22:59 I see a blueish grey dark ring with a lighter center A beautiful smoke ring in the sky Eta Cassiopeiae Cassiopeia SAO 021732 09/01/2017 Cat’s Eye nebula Draco NGC 6543 09/01/2017 0:12 Faint cloudiness with some faint structure. Almach Andromeda SAO 037734 09/05/2017 Mirach Andromeda SAO 054471 09/05/2017 Wild Duck Cluster Scutum NGC 6705 M11 09/07/2017 A dusting of stars with some very large and bright members A box of jewels in the sky Fomalhaut Piscis Austrinus SAO 214197 09/09/2017 22:30 Hercules Cluster Hercules NGC 6205 M13 09/10/2017 0:24 Fuzzy patch of light Fuzzy ball of light. Averted vision shows individual stars. Double Cluster Perseus NGC 869 and NGC 884 09/10/2017 0:12 M32 Andromeda NGC 221 M32 09/09/2017 23:28 Very faint fuzz on edge of M31 required averted vision M34, Perseus Open Cluster Perseus NGC 1039 M34 09/12/2017 Butterfly Cluster Scorpius NGC 6405 M6 09/16/2017 A delicate gathering of stars Easily seen, clear and bright even though it is low Jabbah, Nu Scorpii Scorpius SAO 159764 09/16/2017 Antares. Alph Scorpii Scorpius SAO 184415 09/16/2017 Mizar and Alcor Ursa Major SAO 028737 09/17/2017 Alphecca Corona Borealis SAO 083893 09/17/2017 Tx Piscium Pisces SAO 128374 09/18/17 Dusty Red Star 36 Andromedae Andromeda SAO 074359 09/18/17 12 Aquarii Aquarius SAO 145064 09/18/17 Mu Cygni Cygnus SAO 089940 09/18/17 Saturn w/satellite 09/18/17 7:57pm MDT using the 25mm eyepiece, white object crossed the FOV in 2.5 seconds, moving from top of view to bottom about 2.5 times the width of Saturn to the east. Open Cluster Sagittarius NGC 6531 M21 09/18/17 8:15pm MDT A concentration of young blue stars see sketch, I see a triangle of stars formed by doubles of stars on two sides, and five stars on one side. Open Cluster Sagittarius NGC 6494 M23 09/18/17 8:23pm MDT A scattering of blue stars The stars are very blue Wild Duck Cluster w/ satellite Scutum NGC 6705 M11 09/18/17 9:33pm MDT Saw a bright orangish, white object cross the FOV going north to the east of M11. It took 3 seconds to cross the FOV. M110 Andromeda NGC 205 M110 09/18/17 10:50pm MDT Faint smudge of light Very faint but visible using averted vision brings it out more. Open Cluster Cassiopeia NGC 7654 M52 09/18/17 10:56pm MDT A mostly young and blue collection of stars Mostly blue with a few red stars Open Cluster Cassiopeia NGC 581 M103 09/18/17 11:06pm MDT A rich field of young and old stars Open Cluster Cassiopeia NGC 225 09/18/17 11:12pm MDT a beautiful mix of blue and red stars Pleiades Taurus M45 09/19/17 12:16am MDT Bright collection of very blue stars beautiful, maybe it's my imagination but I think I can see slight nebulosity, Blue Snowball Nebula Andromeda NGC 7662 09/19/17 10:22pm MDT Very light blue, illuminated from within at higher magnification I can just make out some differences in the center. Very simjilar to M57 but much clearer. Did not compare to M57 this evening. Should have done that. Globular Cluster Aquarius NGC 7089 M2 09/19/17 10:46pm MDT Faint fuzzy ball of light I can see some granularity and with averted vision individual stars. Dumbell Nebula, Apple Core Nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 09/19/17 11:36pm MDT Bright and white planetary, with clear structure I remembered to try my LP filter. An Orion Orion Ultrablock Narrowband LP filter. It worked really well. I took a break while I was viewing M27, when i went inside, I forgot my eyepatch and blew my dark adaptation. When I returned, I found I couldn't quite see the nebula without removing the filter. After which I could put the filter back in and see it again. Triangulum Galaxy Triangulum NGC 598 M33 09/20/17 12:21am MDT Very faint fog covering the stars. I can only make this object out if I slew the telescope. Can see a faint patch of fuzzy, when eyes averted and it's moving. Milky Way 09/20/17 20:50 Can clearly see the Milky Way all the way to the horizon. It's washed out a bit, but quite visible. Bortle 4 I believe. Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda NGC 224 M31 09/20/17 21:01 I can clearly see the central bulge and the dust lanes of the outer skirt averted vision helped pull out details Wild Duck cluster Scutum NGC 6705 M11 9/20/2017 21:03 Very bright concentration of stars against a velvety black Whirlpool Galaxy Canes Venatici NGC 5194 M51 09/20/17 21:12 A definite spiral galaxy beautiful spiral shape, impossible to see this detail in Fort Collins Hercules Cluster Hercules NGC 6205 M13 09/20/17 21:27 A tight cluster of stars individual stars at 17mm rather than the 13mm required in Fort Collins Triangulum Galaxy Triangulum NGC 598 M33 09/20/17 21:41 Very faint. Could see it without averted vision. Averted vision helped reveal some detail in the spiral shape The Little Dumbbell Nebula Perseus NGC 650/651 M76 09/20/17 21:58 A white, cloudy, brightness Very sharp outlines. I can see filaments. Cigar Galaxy Ursa Major NGC 3034 M82 09/20/17 22:19 I see a cigar shape tapering at both ends did not need averted vision Bode's Galaxy Ursa Major NGC 3031 M81 09/20/17 22:22 very bright spiral galaxy Beautiful spiral shape. Looking towards the darkest skies to the north I cloud see dust lanes The Owl Nebula Ursa Major NGC 3587 M97 09/20/17 22:33 Very faint nebula Very Faint. Needed narrowband LP filter. Averted vision helped. Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 09/20/17 22:40 Very bright nebula I could clearly see structure outside the bright center. I could see that there was a bright star in the center illuminating it. Kemble's Cascade Camelopardalis 9/30/2017 0:37 A beautiful cascade of stars Still have not seen this naked eye or with 10x50s Open Cluster Camelopardalis NGC 1502 9/30/2017 0:38 A small group of stars M29 Cygnus NGC 6913 M29 9/30/2017 0:52 an intimate collection of stars M2 Aquarius NGC 7089 M2 9/30/2017 1:08 A tight ball of stars was able to see individual stars without averted vision M77 Cetus NGC 1068 M77 9/30/2017 1:21 I thought this was a star Cluster (see sketch below). So I was as wrong as Messier, and Herschel. And therefore, technically not yet seen. M42 Orion NGC 1976 M42 9/30/2017 1:32 Bright and clear nebulosity you can stare at directly. I see four trapezium stars. Wow, this is awesome. I know, I should have sketched it, but the wall of dew was approaching. I went to grab my notebook, and it was wet. Glistening with dew. I turned the hair dryer on it and went back to look at the Orion Nebula again for a few more minutes... Ptolemy Cluster Scorpius NGC 6475 M7 10/04/2017 19:33 A nice scattering of stars. Butterfly Cluster Scorpius NGC 6405 M6 10/04/2017 19:39 A nice tight group of blue stars. I notice one I’ll call “red” to redish yellow off to one side. Open Cluster Sagittarius NGC 6530 10/04/2017 20:56 I consider this a nice grouping of stars The moon is full, I'm not using an eyepatch at all M21, Open Cluster Sagittarius NGC 6531 M21 10/04/2017 21:28 a small handful of stars Wild Duck Cluster Scutum NGC 6705 M11 10/04/2017 21:34 Clear, bright stars with diamond dust underneath Open Cluster Sagittarius IC 4725 M25 10/04/2017 21:45 About 35 stars in a loose group Open Cluster Sagittarius NGC 6613 M18 10/04/2017 21:50 A noticeable concentration of blue stars Checkmark Nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/04/2017 21:57 a sparse collection of stars Eagle Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6611 M16 10/04/2017 22:02 a medium sized collection of mostly blue stars M2, Open Cluster Aquarius NGC 7089 M2 10/04/2017 23:40 a compact ball of stars I can see granularity and individual stars at the edge M71, Globular Cluster Sagitta NGC 6838 M71 10/04/2017 0:12 A very faint globular dusting of stars M29 Cygnus NGC 6913 M29 10/04/2017 0:32 an intimate collection of stars Blinking Planetary Cygnus NGC 6826 10/04/2017 0:40 Small, white, obviously not a star or comet Pleiades Taurus M45 10/06/2017 22:31 A bunch of blue jewels in space Coat Hanger Cluster, Al Sufi's Cluster or Brocchi's Cluster. Vulpecula Cr 399 10/06/2017 22:47 I see a coat hanger! Andromeda Galaxy Andromeda NGC 224 M31 10/06/2017 23:11 Hyades Taurus Caldwell 41 10/06/2017 23:23 Andromeda Galaxy And NGC 224 M31 10/07/2017 20:30 Saturn 10/07/2017 Uranus 10/07/2017 carbon star SAO 012874 Cam SAO 012874 10/07/2017 Kembles Cascade Cam 10/07/2017 failed to spot this with binos Owl Cluster, ET Cluster Cas NGC 457 10/07/2017 Pacman Nebula Cas NGC 281 10/07/2017 failed to spot this with binos Pacman Cluster Cas IC 1590 10/07/2017 Andromeda Galaxy And NGC 224 M31 10/09/2017 M7, Ptolemy Cluster Scorpius NGC 6475 M7 10/09/2017 M25, Open Cluster Sagittarius IC 4725 M25 10/09/2017 M11, Wild Duck Cluster Scutum NGC 6705 M11 10/09/2017 NGC 281, Pacman nebula Cas NGC 281 10/09/2017 NGC 457, open Cluster Cas NGC 457 10/09/2017 M103, open Cluster Cas NGC 581 M103 10/09/2017 NGC 884, Double Cluster Perseus 10/09/2017 M76, little Dumbbell Nebula Perseus NGC 650/651 M76 10/09/2017 M33, Triangulum Galaxy Tri NGC 598 10/09/2017 M52, Open Cluster Cas NGC 7654 M52 10/09/2017 21:55 a good collection of mostly blue stars Open Cluster Cas NGC 663 10/09/2017 22:11 A dense collection of young blue stars NGC 185, galaxy And NGC 185 10/09/2017 NGC 7789, Open cluster Cas NGC 7789 10/09/2017 21:53 A concentration of many stars, most very blue M27, Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 10/09/2017 22:04 M57, Ring Nebula Lyra NGC 6720 M57 10/09/2017 M13, Hercules Cluster Hercules NGC 6205 M13 10/09/2017 Pleiades Taurus 10/09/2017 Cat's Eye Nebula NGC 6543 10/09/2017 M8, Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6523 M8 10/10/2017 20:43 Very clear nebulosity! Cannot see this at all with my unpatched eye. Favorite eyepiece 17mm M10, globular cluster Ophiuchus NGC 6254 M10 10/10/2017 21:29 Faint smudge of greyish white. can see individual stars with averted vision Andromeda Galaxy And NGC 224 M31 10/10/2017 21:45 Very clear and bright tonight M16, Eagle Nebula Serpens NGC 6611 M16 10/10/2017 21:51 Nebulosity faint but visible Needed averted vision to see it. The Omega Nebula, Checkmark nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/10/2017 21:55 Very clear nebulosity here I noticed I thought this was an open cluster last time I looked when the moon was high. I wasn't taking it seriously so I didn't wear my eyepatch either. M24, Small Sagittarius Star Cloud Sagittarius IC 4715 M24 10/11/2017 20:12 Very dense star field Somewhat washed out due to Bortle 6 to 7 skies M8, Lagoon Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6523 M8 10/11/2017 20:24 Very clear nebulosity M20, The Trifid Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6514 M20 10/11/2017 20:33 Faint but visible. Can see edges of cloud forms with AV M17, The Omega Nebula, Checkmark nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/11/2017 21:09 Very clear checkmark Blinking Planetary Cygnus NGC 6826 10/11/2017 21:26 small dense white cloud M27, Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 10/11/2017 21:38 Bright and clearly defined edges without AV This is the brightest nebula in the sky above Fort Collins M57, Ring nebula Lyra NGC 6720 M57 10/11/2017 21:56 Smoke ring in the sky clear, and dark bluish grey M11, Wild Duck cluster Scutum NGC 6705 M11 10/11/2017 22:09 A very nice density of stars Saturn nebula Aquarius NGC 7009 10/12/2017 20:16 Very small, white oval of nebula 17mm and 13mm gave the best views Pacman Nebula Cas NGC 281 10/12/2017 20:50 only see the stars Barnard's Galaxy Sagittarius NGC 6822 10/12/2017 21:12 Another oval smudge used LP filter Planetary Nebula Aquila NGC 6852 10/12/2017 21:19 tiny white nebula 17mm is best here I think M17, Checkmark Nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/12/2017 21:32 amazing nebulosity here M27, Dumbbell nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 10/12/2017 21:50 not quite as defined this evening. NGC 6572 10/12/2017 22:26 10mm eyepiece reveals this is not a star but a very bright planetary nebula NGC 6210 10/12/2017 22:56 I see three things. M27, Dumbbell nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 10/12/2017 23:17 Bright as usual M57 Lyra NGC 6270 M57 10/12/2017 23:28 smoky ring in the sky is blueish SAO 012870 Cam 10/12/2017 23:37 red star. I slew to Kembles cascade from here M76, Little Dumbbell Nebula Perseus NGC 650/651 M76 10/12/2017 23:55 Faint but does not require AV M39, open Cluster Cygnus NGC 7092 M39 10/13/2017 1:03 a small handful of stars M42 Orion NGC 1976 M42 10/12/2017 1:17 amazing nebulosity Without the LP filter I could see the four trapezium stars without AV M31 Andromeda NGC 224 M31 10/15/2017 21:27 Very bright this evening, can see some detail in the outer disk more easily than on other evenings M92 Hercules NGC 6341 M92 10/15/2017 22:39 A very tight ball of white fog. AV reveals some individual stars at higher magnifications M13 Hercules NGC 6205 M13 10/15/2017 22:30 Fabulously clear tonight. I can see individual stars with less magnification than usual. 17mm reveals granularity and individual stars where 13mm is usually required. M56 Lyra NGC 6779 M56 10/15/2017 23:12 a fuzzy white patch of fog M42 Orion NGC 1976 M42 10/15/2017 0:22 Clear and bright nebulosity M8, Lagoon nebula Sagittarius NGC 6523 M8 10/17/2017 20:09 Still an amazing sight M17, Omega, Checkmark Nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/17/2017 20:17 Just see the check mark M20. Triffid nebula Sagittarius NGC 6514 M20 10/17/2017 20:23 Faint but visible nebulosity. AV reveals details. M110, Galaxy And NGC 205 M110 10/17/2017 20:21 A faint but detectable fogginess. I needed to slew the telescope to see this M31, Andromeda Galaxy And NGC 224 M31 10/17/2017 20:25 Quite brright this evening. i can see some detail in the outer disk without AV M32 Dwarf Eliptical Galaxy And NGC 221 M32 10/17/2017 20:27 Bright and clear can see both M31 and M32 together while M110 is quite a ways off. M110, Galaxy And NGC 205 M110 10/17/2017 20:31 I found it this time without goto. M13, Hercules Cluster Hercules NGC 6205 M13 10/17/2017 20:36 A nice glob tonight. Very clear. Lower magnifications reveal individual stars in this glob tonight. 17mm, and the 13, and 10mm are awesome. I like the Svbony 10mm aspheric on these globs, it shows good detail, while retaining good contrast. M92, Globular Cluster Hercules NGC 6341 M92 10/17/2017 20:50 Tight and white takes real mag to bring out individual stars M34, Open Cluster Perseus NGC 1039 M34 10/17/2017 21:33 A sparse collection of stars M15, Globular Cluster Perseus NGC 7078 M15 10/17/2017 21:45 Faint fuzzy ball of light averted vision using the 13mm revealed individual stars and granularity M27, Dumbbell Nebula Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 10/17/2017 21:58 A nebula brightly lit from inside by a white dwarf star M57, Ring Nebula Lyra NGC 6720 M57 10/17/2017 22:08 smoly ring M2, Globular Cluster Aquarius NGC 7089 M2 10/17/2017 22:15 Very tight globular cluster. Take significant magnification (10mm, 8mm, 6mm) to reveal individual stars using AV Butterfly Cluster Scorpius NGC 6405 M6 10/18/2017 Ptolemy Cluster Scorpius NGC 6475 M7 10/18/2017 Lagoon nebula Sagittarius NGC 6523 M8 10/18/2017 Delle Caustiche, Sagittarius Star Cloud Sagittarius IC 4715 M24 10/18/2017 Triffid Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6514 M20 10/18/2017 More visible than the usual fogginess, just a hint of structure Eagle Nebula Sagittarius NGC 6611 M16 10/18/2017 Omega, or Checkmark Nebula Sagittarius Sharpless 45 M17 10/18/2017 M30, Globular Cluster Capricornus NGC 7099 M30 10/18/2017 22:39 A tight white globular, not quite circular M72 Aquarius NGC 6981 M72 10/18/2017 22:53 Very Faint Foggy Patch Saturn nebula Aquarius NGC 7009 10/18/2017 Blinking Planetary Cygnus NGC 6826 10/18/2017 Small white planetary nebula Double Cluster Perseus NGC 884 10/18/2017 A bright and generous scattering of stars M34, Open Cluster Perseus NGC 1039 M34 10/18/2017 A sparse collection of stars NGC 1514 Taurus NGC 1514 10/18/2017 M73 Aquarius NGC 6994 M73 10/18/2017 Four stars NGC 6543 Draco NGC 6543 10/18/2017 M27 Vulpecula NGC 6853 M27 10/18/2017 M57 Lyra NGC 6270 M57 10/18/2017 Aldebaran Taurus 10/18/2017 A redish star Hyades Taurus 10/18/2017 A very interesting group of stars
  14. Hi All, Just sharing a image of the last full moon. This image consists of two single shots, top than bottom half, and combine in PS. Shot with a Canon 40D through the scope at native F10. Thanks for looking Mariusz
  15. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This is quite possibly my last Saturn for 2018. The only reason I would image Saturn again this year, is if in the next couple of weeks I had exceptional seeing. In that case I will resume the attempt to resolve the Encke division with my 8" scope, which I do have hints of in images so I'm confident that it can be done.

    © Mariusz Goralski

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