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Found 93 results

  1. I snapped a few photographs of the Venus on 28th evening and surprisingly noticed a circular rainbow like pattern around the Venus. I'm attaching a photo of the Venus and the moon together and another of the Venus with its blown up image as an inset. The Venus appears too small in the photo with the Moon appearing on the left side but, this pattern can still be observed when the image is blown up. I had snapped such photos of Venus earlier and have also done so on the next day but, none of those showed this peculiar/accidental feature. Could any of you please inspect the photos and let me know weather it's really a rainbow around the Venus or not.
  2. Dear all, yesterday evening after doing the sketch of the three-day old moon, we had a wonderful twilight scene with Venus and the Moon over here. So I did a pastel sketch how I recalled it afterwards: Clear skies! Achim
  3. With the extra time I have at the moment, and the weather being so good, I’ve been catching up on a few jobs I’ve been meaning to do. One of these is the re-spotting and recollimation of the mirror on my newt. I found I didn’t have any ring binder re-enforcers but made something similar by hole punching a self-adhesive label and carefully cutting out. With the collimation done and the sun setting I was keen to see whether my time had been well spent. I think it was November when I last had a proper evening of astro, my efforts earlier this week got hazed out, so I was looking forward to this! First up was Venus in the early twilight. Using my binoviewers and a couple of filters in combination (a ND0.9 and the baader neodinium) I got some encouragement with some good sharp views. I could almost swear I could see a little detail but I’m sure that was just wishful thinking. I also tried a UHC and O111 filters as I had some, but they didn’t show anything better. In fact, the O111 had the peculiar effect that after a few minutes observing a bright green target, when I came to look up at Venus by eye, it appeared a bright and angry orange colour, like Arcturus on steroids. After Venus I chose M45 and then the open clusters in Auriga and this was where my earlier work really showed its value. So many pin sharp little stars, far more than I recall when I last viewed these targets. I always feel surprised at how good these targets are though with M37 and 38 the best of them, being a bit more compact. I also had my new TS80mm frac out to see what I could catch and to compare views of the same targets. All were pleasing, albeit smaller in scale. I was also glad to be able to spot M65 and 66 in Leo. Obviously not as good as in the bigger newt which will show the triplet of galaxies in the same field. Still, I’m happy to know I can pick those up in my local skies with this little scope. It bodes well for darker sky trips in future. I followed up with some globs and ended with M13 in Hercules. Always a favourite, but by now a thin film of ice was settling on the scopes and my chair so it was time to call it a night. I’ve been really cheerful today as a result of getting some scope time in, which just shows the value of a good hobby in times like these. Thanks for reading.
  4. Hello I recently purchased a new celestron telescope and set it up last night to use for the first time. I live in UK, around 8/9pm-ish I took my telescope outside to view Venus in the western sky as it was v bright, perfect opportunity. After finding Venus and increasing the focus I realised that there was something like a large black circle in the centre of the bright blue/white ring of light. Before focussing, it appeared to be just v bright light. I am wondering if anyone can explain to me why this black circle appeared on / in front of Venus. I thought it looked like a moon, which is obviously incorrect but it looked that way. Is it possibly sulphuric clouds of Venus absorbing light? Any information/help is much appreciated happy observing, all!
  5. Hi All, I took this picture by coincidence while trying to take photo of a single cloud on the sky. Is this Venus? Thanks.
  6. Hey guys. Thought about starting this thread. I feel like we all should inform eachother and newer members alike about the magngifications that can be achieved on planets,that provide the best sharpness/size ratio,depending on the scope and seeing. After this thread has grown a bit, i feel like this should be pinned,as to provide a little guide to newer members that are not experienced with planetary observing,as many will be fooled with the typical 50x per inch of aperture and get disappointed when they find that that image will be dim and blurry. For my 8” F/6 Sky-Watcher Dob For Saturn i like to use 150x in medium seeing and if i want something a bit bigger , switch to 240x ,which will give me a bigger,but blurrier image.iBut In good seeing, i found that 240x was very usable.When we have perfect conditions, i m certainly trying 300x. Mars, isnt very big in the sky right now,so even at high magnifications like 300x it still appears as a small orange dot. For observing mars,I suggest waiting for it to reach opposition.It benifits hugely from it! However,this happens once every 2 years....But 5ere are other planets to keep you occupied until then, such as jupiter,saturn and Venus. For Venus, i use 50-100-120 depending on its phase. For Jupiter, i like to use 150x, as it provides a very sharp image,with key features of the planet such as bands being very detailed.Waiting on my 6mm UWA Skywatcher to bring it to 200 and see how that plays out. Be careful! Don’t magnify jupiter too much, as it will loose much of its features and sharpness. Neptune and Uranus: These two will not impress, but are certainly have a nice colour to them. Even ar high magnifications, such as 300x and 400x, they will look like small discs with color in them.Uranus will look be colored green and Neptune a fainter blue. Mercury About mercury...Havent gotten the chance to observe it ,so the guys will have to inform you about that? Feel free to give your own opinions as to give members a wider source of information to help them observe better ! Cheers and clear skies. Kronos
  7. Another image of the Moon, Venus & Spica yesterday morning. Pentax K5 / PENTAX-DA 12-24mm F4 ED AL [IF] lens @24mm / f9 / iso 1600 / 5 sec exp.
  8. At around 14.35 GMT today I observed Venus, Mercury and Jupiter, with my 127mm Mak SLT GoTo. Venus was a large, very thin crescent, trembly in poor seeing. Mercury was easy to see once I got my eye in, and Jupiter was easier to pick out with a red filter. Mercury and Jupiter are now not far apart. (7min RA 3 deg Dec.) The visibility of Mercury seems dependent on atmospheric clarity. On several days recently I looked for it but could not see it.
  9. Aided by GoTo, I observed Venus in daylight this afternoon. It is only a few days from inferior conjunction (26th) and appears as a large thin crescent. It's in an unfavorable position for Northern nocturnal observers and appeared almost below the Sun. I could not see Mercury (which should have been accessible). And before you comment, I checked carefully where the 127mm Mak was pointing before putting my eye to the eyepiece.?
  10. As it was a nice sunny day I tried a little WL solar viewing, but as it was just like looking like a ginormous white snooker ball, I decided to switch to Venus (with the help of my trusty goto mount). After looking at it visually with my C8 SCT, I decided to have a go at imaging it. The below image is the best result I got out of 3,000 images with my ZWO ASI120 mc, with a light blue filter fitted (not that you'd notice with the colour of Venus). Seeing was pants, but the image came out much better than expected. Used Registax, then PS to crop & alter curves a little. Flipped image for correct orientation.
  11. After over two weeks of rain and cloud, I finally get a clear night, and I take full advantage of it! As some of you know, I've been chasing after details on Venus for quite a while now, but I've been shy about shelling out the big bucks to get the necessary filters. Ca-K and UV filters can get pricey, so I chose to be creative and try imaging Venus with my Meade Series 4000 Variable Polarizing Filter to cut some of the glare. In the past, I've been able to see some evidence of detail visually with the filter, but I was never 100% sure of whether what I was seeing was wishful thinking (or "seeing") or actual cloud features. Last evening answered my questions - the filter DOES allow you to see detail on Venus, through a 127mm Mak, even at mags approaching 170X. I could easily see detail near the central region of the onion planet from my 25mm EP right down to my 9mm. And what's more, I was able to image using the filter, pulling out amazing detail with processing in Registax 6 using video shot on my Orion Deep Space Cam II (the analog version)! Here is the result: I was floored at the result! ??? NEW IMAGE, ADDED 3 June: Here is another image from the same video, processed in Registax 6 to bring out darker features Cheers, Reggie
  12. Venus 19/02/2017 18:46 (61.490 million km) GSO 0.20 m Sky-Watcher NEQ-5 Pro SynScan mount QHY5L-IIC + IR cut filter GSO barlow lens 2.5x (APO) f: 2500 mm f/12.5 Matteo Vacca Milis, Italy http://vaccamatteo.weebly.com/ https://www.astrobin.com/users/matteovacca/
  13. Vicky050373

    Venus 20.04.2018

    From the album: Lunar and Planetary Images

    Venus imaged during the afternoon of 20.04.2018. Although imaged in broad daylight, the very short exposures required, just a couple of miliseconds, means the sky looks black. Such short exposures are required to prevent the image over exposing as Venus is so bright. Celestron 8SE and QHY5L-II monochrome camera with Celestron LX 2 x barlow. AVI stacked in Registax with minor adjustments in wavelets. No post-processing other than a slight crop.

    © vicky050373

  14. Here are some more images I took of the Venus/Uranus conjunction in addition to the one already posted. And to think, I was wondering what that pesky star was above Venus! Reggie
  15. Here is a single two-second exposure of the close conjunction of Venus (the brighter object on the left) and Uranus (the fainter, bluish-green object to the right) at ISO 1600. It is a prime focus image taken through my 127mm Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope about an hour after sunset. A striking pair visible in a telescopic view! Reggie
  16. Venus and Uranus will be in conjunction, less than 4' apart, close enough to fit within a low power telescopic view. It will be a challenge to see Uranus at magnitude 5.9 in the evening twilight. Use Venus as your guide. A great astrophotography event!
  17. Luckily had a really clear evening with no clouds on the western horizon I'll try to catch the Venus- Uranus conjunction too at the end of this month
  18. Here is some video I shot of the Venus & Mercury conjunction on the same evening I took the image. Watch out for the geese! Regards, Reggie
  19. From the Malvern Ridge near Black Hill this morning. These are with 100-400L on Canon 7D. Had no luck closer in with the camera attached to an ETX90 tube. Too low / distorted for any Jupiter detail, but can just make out a couple of satellites here.
  20. When I left my house for going to work on October 18, I saw the thin moon crescent close to Venus. It took me about five minutes to collect my equipment (tripod, Canon 5D MKII, 100-400mm zoom lens), so I could take pictures. Thin high clouds illuminated by the rising sun added to the scene.
  21. Jupiter’s only going to be at an altitude of 8° & it’s bound to be cloudy but I’m definitely going to check. With my 10” Dob, paracorr & canon I should be able to get the following fov. I’ll have a go with it on my EQ platform. Not the best imaging rig but worth a go ? If I use a powermate as well it’s as follows Anyone else going to try for this and what with?
  22. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This collection is of my images of Venus I captured during December 2016 and February 2017 which shows the change in phases as Earth catches up to Venus in the orbit around the Sun. The pictures where cloud details are coming through were captured through a UVenus (UV) filter on the clearer atmospheric condition evenings and used as the blue channel. The rest the channels are IRPass 685nm filter as red and luminance (IrCut filter) as green. All were captured using a DMK618 through a 14" Dobsonian.
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