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Found 38 results

  1. Images taken between 04:02 & 04:15 this morning. C9.25; CGEM; ASI385MC; ZWO ADC; ES 3x Telextender; Baader neodymium filter. AutoStakkert!3; RegiStax6; PS CS4 Extended. Socially distanced comments/suggestions welcomed as always.
  2. The July edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. Astronomical darkness returns to the southern part of the UK this month, and we have: * Yet another "promising" comet * Asteroid Ceres * Neptune and Uranus return I hope this helps you to fill your evenings (actually, more likely pre-dawn mornings!) enjoyably. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies.
  3. At long last I have managed to image Caliban, also known as Uranus XVI. It is a small (circa 72km) outer satellite of Uranus which was discovered in September 1997 using the Hale 5m telescope at Palomar. Incidentally, Sycorax (U-XVII)was discovered in the same observing session. That satellite is around 1.7 magnitude brighter and so much easier to observe. Although a three hours exposure, unfiltered for maximum sensitivity, was used the signal to noise ratio is barely 3 and serious image processing was needed to produce a relatively clear image. Even so, it is not especially obvious. The reason is that the MPOC ephemeris predicts that the satellite has a magnitude of 22.2 at the time of observation. More information is available at http://www.astropalma.com/Projects/Satellites/caliban.html
  4. Hi all, This is my third Uranus capture this season. I am much happier with this result. The seeing helped a lot and the sky quality was favorable. This image is the result of 5 de-rotated videos on Winjupos, all captured with IR742 filter. The result was used as luminance in the composition. RGB came from a normal color capture. Following the images of other friends, we can notice the atmospheric activity on the planet. It seems to be changing every week. Many changes can still happen until the opposition. Lucas Magalhaes
  5. Hello stargazers, welcome. I had posted a picture yesterday of Uranus that had appeared to show its rings. I am using a Nexstar 4se, a 2x Barlow, and my Neximage Burst Color and capturing hundreds of photos and stacking them for my results. But still had me and others curious to if I were actually seeing the rings of Uranus or maybe just a glare of some sort. So I got back out there this morning, might I note I live in FL where the weather tends to stay hot so clear imaging during this time of year can be difficult, but not impossible as this image that I stacked 150 out of 300 images taken may show that statement holds true..............or I could just be mistaken the object in the image, but all in all I am feeling pretty confident that I have a decently clear image(stacked 150 images) of Uranus, its rings, and one of it's distant moons. It may be necessary to zoom in on my photo in order to see the moon it should be down and to the right of the planet a good distance in relation to the size of planet, I noticed that looking at Uranus in the photo helped bring the moon out just like stargazing in real-time. If anyone can better distinguish what I might have done right or wrong here any help would be appreciated (also forgot to change format save for my images so I am stuck with .bmp and setting it as a download, sorry for any inconvenience.) - - - J47(JAY) uranusringmoon.bmp
  6. Hi everyone I managed to wake up early this morning and get a great image processed using Registax6.1 of Uranus. I am new to astrophotography but enjoying every second of it. I have a Nexstar 4se that I used to capture these images with also increased my zoom by using a 2x Barlow. Only through my Neximage Burst Color (in which was used to take the images) was I able to make out to hazy blue planet best. Using iCap2.4 software for capturing the images heres what I did..... - Images taken and processed September 4, 2019 around 5:00 A.M.- 5:30 A.M. - decreased the gain to around 330-380 while exposure was set to 27 fps - adjusted my focus - took 200 frames at 25 fps Continuing to Registax I processed the images only using the best frames out of 100, I added a few prefilters: BLUR was adjusted slightly to around 10-15, SMOOTH was decreased by around 5, and contrast prefilter, forget what it was called, was reduced to .90. I tuned the wavelets until the hazy spot between the rings and planet were no longer visible and the difference with the rings and planet begin to appear. Here's the results hope they are as cool to everyone else, as I find it amazing my 4se can see that much into detail. uranus-rings.bmp
  7. The August edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: * A grazing occultation of a bright star * Moon occulting stars in the Hyades * See both ice giants as well as Vesta * Review of the Celestron EclipSmart 10x25 solar binocular I hope it helps you to get the best out of these late summer nights with your binoculars or small telescopes. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month. Warning: Do not attempt to observe the Sun with any optical system that is not specifically designed for the purpose.
  8. The latest edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: * Uranus and Neptune are back (just!) * A couple of Mira variables near maximum * Ceres is still available * Review of the Bino Bandit I hope it helps you to get the best out of these short summer nights with your binoculars or small telescopes. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
  9. Hey guys. Thought about starting this thread. I feel like we all should inform eachother and newer members alike about the magngifications that can be achieved on planets,that provide the best sharpness/size ratio,depending on the scope and seeing. After this thread has grown a bit, i feel like this should be pinned,as to provide a little guide to newer members that are not experienced with planetary observing,as many will be fooled with the typical 50x per inch of aperture and get disappointed when they find that that image will be dim and blurry. For my 8” F/6 Sky-Watcher Dob For Saturn i like to use 150x in medium seeing and if i want something a bit bigger , switch to 240x ,which will give me a bigger,but blurrier image.iBut In good seeing, i found that 240x was very usable.When we have perfect conditions, i m certainly trying 300x. Mars, isnt very big in the sky right now,so even at high magnifications like 300x it still appears as a small orange dot. For observing mars,I suggest waiting for it to reach opposition.It benifits hugely from it! However,this happens once every 2 years....But 5ere are other planets to keep you occupied until then, such as jupiter,saturn and Venus. For Venus, i use 50-100-120 depending on its phase. For Jupiter, i like to use 150x, as it provides a very sharp image,with key features of the planet such as bands being very detailed.Waiting on my 6mm UWA Skywatcher to bring it to 200 and see how that plays out. Be careful! Don’t magnify jupiter too much, as it will loose much of its features and sharpness. Neptune and Uranus: These two will not impress, but are certainly have a nice colour to them. Even ar high magnifications, such as 300x and 400x, they will look like small discs with color in them.Uranus will look be colored green and Neptune a fainter blue. Mercury About mercury...Havent gotten the chance to observe it ,so the guys will have to inform you about that? Feel free to give your own opinions as to give members a wider source of information to help them observe better ! Cheers and clear skies. Kronos
  10. The February Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. In addition to the usual stuff on DSOs and variable and double stars, this month we have: Uranus still available Occultation of δ Cnc X Oph near maximum Grazing occultation of 63 Tau (Devon only) I hope it helps you to enjoy these chilly winter nights. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
  11. I've not yet seen Uranus through my scope and am going to make an effort once the clouds blow away (of course we get a storm the moment I get back into astronomy!). Based on the equipment i have (please see signature) can you all give some tips on how I might have success in this endeavor? Would be much appreciated!
  12. The first Binocular Sky Newsletter of 2019 is ready. In addition to the usual stuff on DSOs and variable and double stars, this month we have: Uranus still available Comet 46P/Wirtanen fading X Oph brightening Two (difficult) grazing occultations Here's hoping that 2019 brings us all an abundance of clear, dark skies. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
  13. The November edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: * Uranus still available * Comet 46P * Mira brightening * Asteroid occultation for southern England So grab those binocs (or small telescope) and enjoy the glories that the night sky has to share with us. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab. You can also subscribe (also free) and have it emailed each month.
  14. Does anyone here use eye glasses *only* for astronomy? I'm a young guy with good eye sight. But here's a story that makes me wonder if I need eye glasses. I went to Death Valley National Park in early November last year (2017), just about three weeks after Uranus was at opposition. I set up a modest (~2 inch) telescope I had borrow from a friend at Ubehebe Crater, which is at the northern end of the park. The northern end of park has a virtually perfect sky. If you check lightpollutionmap.info, this site is a Bortle class 1 sky, artificial brightness = 0.17 ucd/m^2. In other words, this was the best possible place and time to see Uranus. In fact, I did find Uranus, but only with the aid of the telescope and a star chart app that told me exactly where to look. The app had enough background stars that I could identify Uranus through the scope, and it had the same blue color as in Voyager pictures. (Later that night I even found Neptune!) But I also wanted to see Uranus with my unaided eye. This was my best chance, and how cool would that be, to say you really saw the seventh planet with your own bare eyes? Unfortunately, even when I knew exactly where to, I had no such luck. Some of the main stars in Pieces (where Uranus was) were even so dim that I could barely see them with averted vision (and even then I had to kinda wonder if I was only imagining seeing them). Why I couldn't see Uranus near opposition in Death Valley, with a clear, dry sky and no light pollution and knowing exactly where to look? My best guesses are (1) vision problems and (2) eyes never fully dark adjusting. 1) I'm in my late 20s and don't wear glasses. Last I checked, I had 20/20 vision. But maybe I've become very subtly near sighted (my job involves staring at a computer screen all day). 2) I was checking the star chart app fairly frequency to orient myself. Maybe my vision never fully adjusted? I think I must have gone at least 20 minutes without looking, which should be enough to fully adjust? I've also had some difficultly seeing M31 and other "easy" targets with the naked eye. I really don't think I can get a prescription for eye glasses from the doctor, because I see fine in daily life and had mine checked about a year ago (no problems). So my question: Does anyone here use eye glasses *only* for astronomy? If so, where do you get a good pair? I really want to experience the joy of astronomy with my bare eyes and not just the telescope. If anyone has insights here, please let me know. Thanks everyone!
  15. I've always had a favourite spot for Uranus as its blue prettiness rolls about the sun with its Shakespearean moons...and then this ! http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-24/uranus-smells-like-rotten-eggs-scientists-find/9692186
  16. Here are some more images I took of the Venus/Uranus conjunction in addition to the one already posted. And to think, I was wondering what that pesky star was above Venus! Reggie
  17. Here is a single two-second exposure of the close conjunction of Venus (the brighter object on the left) and Uranus (the fainter, bluish-green object to the right) at ISO 1600. It is a prime focus image taken through my 127mm Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope about an hour after sunset. A striking pair visible in a telescopic view! Reggie
  18. Venus and Uranus will be in conjunction, less than 4' apart, close enough to fit within a low power telescopic view. It will be a challenge to see Uranus at magnitude 5.9 in the evening twilight. Use Venus as your guide. A great astrophotography event!
  19. Happy New Years Everyone, On December's Supermoon evening, December 3, 2017 at about 9:56pm, the seeing here in Southeastern Pennsylvania was excellent (4/5 - 5/5 Sky clock). I decided to turn my Meade LX50-10" SCT to the Ice Giant Planet Uranus. After doing quite a bit of research in imaging the 7th planet, I used an ASI120mm camera with a Baader 610nm Long Pass Filter. I choose not to use a Barlow since from historical experiences with Mars I find I obtain small but sharp results without one. I acquired 39minutes of video at a frame rate of 4 fps with a gain of 73 collecting 10,012 total frames. Using AS2 I stacked the best 3000 frames using a 1.5 drizzle then processed further using Registax 6 and PS5. My question is did I capture any details on the planet? Using WINJUPOS and Moon positions, I also show the orientation of the planet at the time of imaging. The colored image is just a combination of the Near IR610RGB inserted in place of the overexposed Uranus showing the moons. Just seeking anyone's ideas. Thank you so much for looking, All my best, Kevin
  20. Hi Guys, My first attempt at Uranus. Used 10mm eye piece projection method to capture this shot, 0.5sec sub at ISO1600. Many lessons were learnt in the end and now looking forward to imaging again next time with better planning/foresight. Enjoy
  21. Neptune: Neptune & Triton, note very faint mag. 14.34 start left of 12 o'clock: Uranus: Uranus, Titania, Oberon, Ariel and just possibly a very faint Umbriel:
  22. A clear night sky and lots of free time were a recipe for a satisfying night of observing and imaging with my Mak. My imaging targets were the freshly opposed Uranus and its more distant cousin Neptune. A trick I use to find Uranus is to star hop from Hamal to Sheratan in Aries to Eta Piscium and Omicron Piscium in Pisces. Uranus is just above Omicron. This is a single 2 second exposure at ISO1600: Neptune was a little trickier to image as I only had the viewfinder on the scope to guide me and Neptune was undetectable through the camera. I had to point the scope in the general area that I knew Neptune was in, using Lambda Aquarii as a guidepost, and I took several test shots to look for familiar star patterns. But, I got it, using a 10 second exposure time at ISO1600: Had a great night imaging and star chasing, and even saw an Orionid before all was said and done! Clear skies to all, Reggie
  23. Here is a prime focus shot I took of Uranus through my 127mm Mak a few weeks ago just before the Mars/Uranus conjunction: Cheers! Reggie
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