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Found 159 results

  1. The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) is an open cluster of mostly hot young blue-white stars that appears to the unaided eye as a bright 4th magnitude star close to the Southern Cross. Only visible from southern latitudes, the Jewel Box was first recorded by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1751 and was later described by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones" - hence the name "Jewel Box". The Jewel Box Open Cluster ( ngc 4755 ) in the Crux constellation. ( please click / tap to see larger and sharper ) ........... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) image Plate Solver script version 5.0 =========== Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.000 deg Focal ............. 1375.43 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 49.3" x 39' 17.8" Image center ...... RA: 12 53 40.040 Dec: -60 21 02.81 ========== Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 11 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8th sec to 120 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 10 x 120sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 11sets HDR combination
  2. Hi everyone. So I'm interested in grinding my first mirror and building my first telescope. I've been reading all that I can about telescopes and watching videos on YouTube. What I want to make is what would probably be best described as a Nasmyth Cassegrain style telescope. My initial idea is to use a 12 inch parabolic primary ground to a focal ratio of 15 and a flat secondary. With a 15 foot focal length the end result will be approximately a 9 foot tube, which is fine, that's actually what I want. I don't care that it won't fit in the trunk of my car, it's not an issue. After reading some articles I've learned that most Cassegrain style telescopes use a convex secondary and a steeper curvature on the primary. Would this be better? Would aberrations be worse with a flat secondary? I want as sharp of an image as I can get without sacrificing either aperture or focal length. It seems intuitive to me that a faster primary would result in a poorer image than using an f15 with a flat secondary...thoughts?
  3. Hello everyone! I have a Celestron Astromaster 70az. I've been on winter break recently and have got the opportunity to utilize it in the evenings and early mornings. I used it this morning around 4-5 am IST to spot Jupiter, and boy was I overcome by excitement. Since I acquired this scope from my cousins', it's been rather untouched. Perhaps the alignment/collimation is off but I only see a distant white speck. It could be the shortcomings of my telescope but I would rather have you guys correct my understanding on this as I am a novice to astronomy. My main inner debate was whether I should look for extra accessories or purchase a more powerful scope good enough for planetary observation. (Sidenote: I have a 20mm and a 10mm scope that came with this box). Now, I live in the middle of Mumbai which is a bustling city. I realize light pollution and other pollution also factor in greatly. I would like to hear more experienced people out before making hasty decisions. Thank you, -H
  4. Ok, so my lovely 9 year old son wrote his xmas list and at the top was...a decent beginner level telescope. I did a little homework since the boy has been using a nice set of Celestron binoculars until now, and decided to go for the Inspire mostly due to its phone mount that lets the phone see what the telescope sees for photographing. The question is...whilst I know we should get some pretty lovely views of the moon...does anyone have any idea if there's anything else we may spot? Or if I've even made the right choice for him! Thanks everyone!
  5. Well, I have finally got my head around recording and stacking tonight and since it was a crisp, clear sky and a beautiful Waxing Crescent Moon shining out my window I decided to take my new Neximage Burst put it in my Celestron 114 LCM and headed out to my garden with my all my necessary equipment with me. I followed a great tutorial on how iCap and Registax worked and used these tutorials to record the Moon. When the recording was done I stacked and processed the recording using Registax and when the final outcome came I was shocked how good it looked to me. Maybe to you professional astrophotographers it may look very poor. But for a first timer it isn't that bad right? I am proud of it and hopefully it will be first of many for me! I can't wait till Venus rises up so I can practice on an actual planet. Though I am aware of the way Venus's atmosphere is extremely reflective with the amount of CO2 in in it's atmosphere and nearly every image turns white. But having a timelapse of photos of it's phases would be pretty cool. But before I go onto Venus I am definitely going to practice on the Moon. A budding astronomer moon1 processed.bmp
  6. It's that time of year again, the nights are getting darker and I'm inspired once again to begin researching into a telescope investment, but each year I spend so long bewildered by the vast choice of scopes, that time moves on and lighter nights begin drawing closer. this year I want to change that and I'm looking for guidance into purchasing my first 'real' telescope. As I have mentioned in my previous introduction post, I have been fascinated with the night sky and space for as long as I know, and I did have a high street quality telescope in 1994 when I was 11 year old which I have fond memories of. Here are a few ideas of what I would expect to use a telescope for. As the celestial events occur year after year, and I have nothing but a pair of binoculars that may as well be made from chocolate and the naked eye, I kick myself for not having taken the bull by the horns and making a choice of a telescope. Naturally as a photographer i am going to want to take photos of things that I see. Understandably this is going to be a huge learning curve in new photographic techniques and editing etc, but it is definitely a desire that my telescope is going to need to be able to fulfill. We all need to start out somewhere and so naturally lunar shots and shots of nearby planets in the solar system would perhaps be my first realistic goals in astrophotography. Eventually a few years down the line once I have got to know my telescope and also the skies above my head better, then I would like to think I could progress into some deep space photography. I do have photographs of the Moon which I have taken using a 300mm lens on a D7000 and even that took some time to perfect - so I totally get that deep space photography of nebulas and galaxies is a long term goal and whilst it is something that i am definitley looking at being able to do, it's not something that i'm going to be able to jump right into. Small steps at a time will do it. With regards to my situation, I live UK, in Rothwell which is on a bit of a hill that over looks Leeds City down in the Valley around a mile or so away, I can only imagine the City lights do generate a fair amount of light pollution, but with limited mobility in my legs and no car, I'm going to need to work around that as most of my viewing is most likely going to be from my back yard. From my back yard on a clear day with all the house lights and outside lights turned off, most of the constellations can be seen with a naked eye. I haven't even began to look for nebulas or galaxies as i currently don't know what I am looking for or where. This is going to be much of the fun of the telescope - learning and discovering the night above me and making a photographic journal of what I see. As for portability of the telescope, it's not important that it is portable, because it would only be on rare occasions that I can see me being able to take it out into the field due to the limited mobility and lack of transport, it just needs to be portable enough for me to be able to get it in and out of the house with or without help. My instincts tells me that its perhaps a good idea to purchase a more advanced telescope that I am going to be able to grow into as my experience, knowledge and skills advance, although I could be totally wrong about that and more advanced features will only complicate the early stages or learning? I don't know and this is where I need some guidance. My current budget is around £500, but If I was to wait a couple of months that budget could be stretched to £1000. I look forward to being guided towards the right telescope ranges / types and I look forward to embarking on a new venture into learning and discovery. Lee.
  7. Hello! I have been looking through the forums sections of this site and found that nichrome wire is a very popular material for dew heaters. I was using my DSLR a several weeks back, and the dew was horrible and it encouraged me to build a nichrome heater. My first heater prototype consisted of 22" of wire with a resistance of 4.08 ohm per foot connected directly into a 12V power supply (consisting of 8 AA batteries in parallel). It was wrapped in duck tape. It worked for a while, but then the batteries began to overheat and I had to pull the heater out to let them cool. When I used the same prototype heater on 6V (4 AA batteries) it didn't have this same overheating issue, but it produced less heat then when it was on 12V. I'm not using a pulse width modulator, but would that solve this issue? I'm worried as the heater is only really around 8 ohm, it may be short circuiting with such little resistance. The wire can't be terribly long as this is just to heat a DSLR lens. Any input on a solution would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  8. I'm spending the summer in Canada so I'm looking to buy a scope while I'm there (Instead of shipping my Evo 9.25'). I'm literally looking for a reasonably priced scope motorized scope that is also capable of taking the weight of my DSLR since I do a lot of astroimaging. I've been looking at some of the Skywatcher Reflectors and a couple of Celestron's reflectors but I'm not sure what to buy. What would you recommend? I'll be shipping it back to the UK as well when I return.
  9. Hello all! I am a total noob and I have an eyepiece and a Barlow lens question: I have the Gskyer AZ70700 Refractor Telescope that I bought from amazon for my father and we have been using it for a week. It came with the 10 and 25mm eyepieces and a 3x Barlow lens. My father's old "BRESSER TRAVEL 20-60X60 SPOTTING SCOPE" that our cat destroyed had a zooming option that my father loved so after some research, I've also ordered the "Celestron 8-24mm Zoom Eyepiece (1.25")" from amazon and I hope it will work well with the telescope when it arrives in a week. I also assumed it would be a better quality eyepiece than the eyepieces that came with the telescope. Now my question is: Do you think a 5mm eyepiece would work well with my telescope? If so, what is the best 5mm eyepiece that I can buy below $30. Another question I have is that the 3x Barlow Lens that I have is making the view blurry and not clear like when I don't use the Barlow lens. Do you think a 2x Barlow lens would be better for our telescope? If so, what is the best 2x Barlow lens that I can buy below $30. I saw 2 Barlow lenses that were made by SVBONY and Solomark that are around $16 but I don't know if they are the right ones for our telescope and I wouldn't know which one to buy. I assume maybe I won't need to buy the 5mm eyepiece for better viewing if the 2x Barlow lense will work with my 10mm eyepiece or with the Celestron 8-24mm Zoom Eyepiece. What do you guys think? I would really appreciate any answers.
  10. I'm brand new to this site, but I'm having an issue with my Celestron Powerseeker 127eq telescope. It's brand new right out of the box today. I have another telescope, Zhummel Z10, but the celestron just won't focus. It gets so close to focusing and just needs a little more. Any my help is appreciated thank!
  11. Pressure Tuning review Hello everyone, I figured I would write down my thoughts on my Lunt LS60 pressure tune retrofit, bear with me though, I am a solar baby and cannot talk the talk as deeply as you seasoned observers. On May 17 of this year I shipped off my Lunt for a pressure tune retrofit, it was originally a tilt tuner, I was always wondering why it had a tuner at all considering the views were great, I was able to see both prominences and disc detail like filaments and so on simultaneously which was great. But the tilt tuner left me feeling like I was missing out after reading about what tuning really meant, by that I mean no matter how much I turned that little wheel back and forth absolutely nothing changed no matter how good seeing was or how steady I kept my gaze, and my eyes are good. Both Lunt and my local telescope shop whom I trust very much upon inspection assured me that it will not be a visible change, the wheel they say was to snap the etalon into band and not so much to tune through different features, on or off band and that was what it's function was I was told. Ok I was ok with that, the views were great so I didn't let it chew away at me, but a small part of me was convinced that my tuning wheel was not working properly, it turned with such ease that a stiff breath would spin it, it just didn't have any resistance at all and it bugged me a bit. I decided to take the hit and ship it off for a retrofit to pressure tuning, the cost would be $500 US plus shipping back and forth, which in Canadian turned out to be $850 all said and done, i purchased the scope for such a great price that I figured why not I'd still be ahead anyway. Off it went, I was nervous knowing pimple faced teen aged warehouse kids would be hurling my scope into and out of trucks, but it arrived safely and the wait was on, Lunt customer service was commendable to say the least, they assured the retrofit would be an improvement and so helpful and informative throughout the whole process. Exactly two months later I received my scope, which was about 3 weeks longer than the time I was quoted but that's ok, the eclipse is around the corner here in north america and Lunt is busier than ever. I must mention that there was an issue with the feather touch focusser when it arrived, it was rough and felt like it had received a hard knock, I contacted Lunt and they offered to send me a standard focusser until after the eclipse because they had no feather touch in stock. I didn't blame them for the focusser, but they were concerned and offered to take action before interrogating me and diverting blame to the shipper and that is a commendable thing, it turns out that after some investigation by me I realized that it was my fault, I recall shipping the scope on its side within the case which left the focuser knob contacting the lid of the case , I remember having to press the lid down a bit too hard. After speaking to starlight, the focuser manufacturer, they said they've seen that before, a knock will misalign the focuser and it clearly was knocked during shipping I managed to fix the focuser after all, now let's hear about the pressure tuning already right! First thing that struck me was the size of the tuning cylinder, it is larger and adds more weight than I imagined, this is great for a good grip on the cylinder (which you'll need!!) I'll get to that later, but it did throw the balance of the scope on my Grand Polaris mount way off, so much so that I was unable to move the clamshell forward enough on the bracket to offset the added weight, if my bracket was another 2 inches longer it would be ok, something I have to consider. One very important factor when switching to pressure tuning is the mount, I'm using a rock solid Vixen GP, oldie but goodie, it's solid as a mountain and smooth as silk, but I'm afraid that anything less would have made for a hard time. Pressure tuning is nowhere near as effortless as turning that little wheel, i can guarantee that if you are planning on mounting one on anything less than a very sturdy mount you may be frustrated, the effort required to turn the wheel is far greater than the force required to turn any focuser. You definitely don't want the sun to look like a dot on an oscilloscope while you're trying to find your tuning preference. I figure I'll describe what pressure tuning is from a mechanical point of view, it is as simple as a cylinder with a piston inside that forces air into a chamber inside the scope. As you thread the cylinder in it pushes air into the chamber surrounding the etalon which in turn physically affects the etalon. I have been enjoying the pressure tuner a lot lately and made sure to give it a fair chance under good seeing conditions, so far it has been a pleasure to use comparing with tilt tuning. It was explained to me that tilt tuning (this is from Lunt) is to snap the etalon into band and not for tuning back and forth during a session, I was sold it was on or off band and that's about it. The pressure tuner right away showed off its superiority, i am now able to finely tune back and forth revealing different features in full detail rather than a happy mid point for all features which is where I was at with tilt tuning. Some people i understand leave their tuning point in one place and don't touch it which is fine, but I greatly enjoyed finely turning that cylinder through its travel, ever so slightly and watching different features reveal themselves in fine detail. Being a noob in solar astronomy I cannot yet get into the hard core jibber jabber behind every features characteristics, I don't yet know if I'm seeing dilithium Crystals emitted from the flux ionic resonations within cavitation nodules but I'll get there lol. One thing I can speak of though is when I turn that cylinder I can actually see its effects whereas before I was unable to exact any meaningful change on the suns disc. One thing I was very curious about was if there would be any banding where certain sections of the disc were in tune while other parts were not, my tilt tuned model had an annoying issue where the best view was to the far right and as the disc moved detail would drop off near center. I understand this is common and can be different in every scope, I am happy to say that the disc pretty evenly detailed across its face, I've carefully watched as I moved the disc side to side looking for bad spots and with the exception of the outer edge I cannot see any detail drop off. I'm glad because Lunt says they can do their best to remedy that but cannot guarantee it won't have banding. I hope this little write up can help others who may be contemplating the same retrofit, one has to ask whether a pricey retrofit is worth the cost, I myself think it was definitely worth it, aside from the advantages of pressure tuning itself I'm sure it's resale value improved a fair bit. I did notice that Lunt did change the serial number sticker on my scope. The serial number changed from 2009920 to 0001392 which kind of gives it a whole new identity I guess, kind of like if Ford restored your car to new condition and even changed the VIN number lol. In conclusion i would advise anyone to pack their cope carefully and make sure your scope is sitting on its belly and not sideways like i did unfortunately, and please do yourself a huge favour and insist on a signature required return from lunt. My scope was left on my front doorstep, big box sitting there just screaming to be taken, i almost lost my mind! and insist than lunt ad a bit more foam around the sides between your scopes metal case and the shipping box not just foam end caps and 2 inches of empty space all around the sides of the box, this is something that kind of upset me, lucky it was ok though. Anyway, if anyone out there has any questions I'll be glad to answer them if I can, thank you for your patience regarding my lack of in depth knowledge.
  12. Hello, Recently, one of my friends has moved out of the country and he has handed me (and other friends) certain items he couldn't take with him or didn't want to sell. Considering that I was the biggest star lover of the bunch , having learnt a few constellations -mostly to figure out where north is while hiking, I've been handed down his old telescope. I have researched a bit about it these past 3 days I've had it, and I would like to ask a few questions if you would be so kind to answer. So, first things first, what I've figured out (or have been told) so far: 1) It is on an equatorial mount (I'm 90% sure). 2) It is QUITE old (more than 15 years old). 3) I have 2 Barlow lenses (or mounts?): one 1.5X and one 3X, and 2 eyepieces: one 25mm and one 4mm, the latter I believe to be a Huygenian (Huygensian? Huyngensoid?) type since it has a very tiny top lens. 4) Any packaging and/or documentation is long fossilized in an unknown attic somewhere in south-eastern Europe. Rather than waste your time with other suppositions I've made that may or may not be true, I will tell you what it says on the actual telescope: 1) The mark is BSA Optics. 2) It's made in China. 3) On a label on the side, it says "AT375X112", and beneath "375X112mm". The questions I have are as follows: 1) What could I expect to see with the current equipment? Planets? Comets? Nebulae? Is it possible to see Andromeda? I tried using it for yesterday's peak of the Perseids, but it wasn't of much use (or I didn't know how to use it); 2) What documentation would you suggest? I don't have a lot of expandable income, but if there's two things I never scrimp on, it's books and drinks with friends. Also, as far as star charts/maps go, what should I get? I would like, if possible, something that can be used at different latitudes. 3) Are there any pieces of equipment that wouldn't set me back too far, something that would be worth it for improving my experience? Thank you for your help. P.S. Sorry for any English errors, it's not my first language.
  13. Hi, I was asked on a Swedish forum to put an "Astronomical Dictionary" on my homepage. I have made a test page in an easy form. Astronomical related words linked to wikipedia. It aims to the beginners in astronomy so it should not be too complicated words. http://astrofriend.eu/astronomy/astronomical-dictionary/astronomical-dictionary.html Let me know if it's useful and and I shall add more words. /Lars
  14. Hello I have recently brought my first telescope and am looking to upgrade the eye pieces. I have a celestron powerseeker 127eq and was wondering which eyepiece set would best suit the telescope for planets and galaxies. Thanks.
  15. Hi there, have recently acquired an Alt-Az mount: and am contemplating attaching an inclinometer as a means of getting in the ball-park of an object in terms of Altitude. Most decent inclinometers on the market use a magnet for attachment, unfortunately there is a distinct lack of ferrous metal in my kit, the only element apart from screws with magnetic capability is the Vixen counter-weight. Interested to find out how other people might have tackled this situation. Encoders and DSCs not an option at this moment in time, although will look to go down this route sometime in the future however at this point would probably look to swap out the Sabre for something like an AYO Digi II. Kind Regards Paul J.
  16. Well, if you can't take your gear outside, I thought to myself, you might as well have a play with it anyway. In the absence of any clear skies for ages, I've been tidying up and sorting out my gear. While I was at it, I took a few photos of it all, and thought I'd share it here. I have 3 setups in total, acquired over the past seven years or so. My first proper telescope was my Celestron 6" Schmidt-Cassegrain on a CG-5 GOTO mount - a fantastic bit of kit, something that's given me a huge amount of viewing pleasure since the day I got it. Here's a snap: I use this a lot when I'm doing public observing events with the Cotswold AS - nice and portable, but big enough aperture to show things off well to visitors etc. The GOTO cuts down on the time spent hunting too. A couple of years ago I wanted to get something really portable as a grab-and-go, and ended up getting hold of a Skywatcher Startravel-102 4" refractor. I got an EQ3-2 mount (not driven) to stick it on. This is great for taking away on holidays etc, and is also pretty good as a back garden instrument for wide field viewing. I've got a Baader fringe-killer to try and minimise the chromatic aberration, but there's no real cure for that (other than spending much more cash on some fancy glass...) Finally, the recently adopted workhorse of my observing - a Skywatcher Skyliner 250PX 10" Dob. No frills, no electronics, no alignment - just a whopping great mirror and a hole to look through! This is a brilliant back garden telescope, especially if (like me) you enjoy the time spent star-hopping and using your atlas to find those elusive NGCs. On a good night in my (semi-urban) location I get some really great views of the deep sky with this - and the planets are always brilliant. Jupiter in recent months has been phenomenal, and I've had some great views of Mars this year too. Highly recommended if you're all about visual observing. In terms of eyepieces etc, I keep it really simple: just two eyepieces and a Televue 2x Barlow. My eyepieces are a 24mm Televue Panoptic, and a 7mm Baader Genuine Ortho. The Panoptic is excellent in all three telescopes, although the same can't be said for the ortho, and to be honest, I will probably look for something else soon for high magnification / planetary viewing. Something with a wide apparent field of view, to minimise the amount of Dob nudging I need to do in the absence of any motors! Anyway, there you go - my pride and joy. Just wish it would stop raining so I could use the blumming things
  17. Sir John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope Having spent the years 1825 to 1833 cataloguing the double stars, nebulae and clusters of stars visible from Slough, in the south of England, John Herschel, together with his family and telescopes, set sail from Portsmouth on the 13th of November 1833 bound for Cape Town. As detailed below, in an extract from his book, the family enjoyed a pleasant and uneventful voyage and arrived some 5 months later at Table Bay with all family and instruments in good condition. Reading on however, one might very well think that it might not have ended so well had they but left shortly after ... “... (iii.) Accordingly, having- placed the instrument in question, as well as an equatorially mounted achromatic telescope of five inches aperture, and seven feet focal length, by Tulley, which had served me for the measurement of double stars in England; together with such other astronomical apparatus as I possessed, in a fitting condition for the work, and taken every precaution, by secure packing, to insure their safe arrival in an effective state, at their destination, they were conveyed (principally by water carriage) to London, and there shipped on board the Mount Stewart Elpliinstone, an East India Company's ship, Richardson,Esq. Commander, in which, having taken passage for myself and family for the Cape of Good Hope, we joined company at Portsmouth, and sailing thence on the13th November, 1833, arrived, by the blessing of Providence, safely in Table Bay, on the 15th January, 1834, and landed the next morning, after a pleasant voyage, diversified by few nautical incidents, and without seeing land in the interim. It was most fortunate that, availing himself of a very brief opportunity afforded by a favorable change of wind, our captain put to sea when he did, as we subsequently heard that, immediately after our leaving Portsmouth, and getting out to sea, an awful hurricane had occurred from the S. W. (of which we experienced nothing), followed by a series of south-west gales, which prevented any vessel sailing for six weeks. In effect, the first arrival from England, after our own, was that of the Claudine, on the 4th of April, with letters dated January 1st.(iv.) ...” “Result of Astronomical Observations, Made During the Years 1834, 5, 6, 7, 8, At the Cape of Good Hope ... “ by Sir John Herschel, 1847 John Herschel rented a property and set up the twenty foot reflector near Table Mountain, at a site, that was then, just outside of Cape Town. The Twenty Feet Reflector at Feldhausen, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, 1834 This telescope was made by Herschel in England and transported, along with his other instruments, by ship to Cape Town and then inland to Feldhausen. The telescope is a Newtonian reflector, built to William Herschel’s design, with a focal length of 20 feet and clear aperture of 18 1/4 inches ( f13 ). The location of the telescope was established by careful survey to be: lat 33d 55’ 56.55”, long 22h 46’ 9.11” W ( or 18.462 deg E ). The site of the great telescope was memorialised by the people of Cape Town by the erection of a granite column that is still there today. ............. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy Amongst his many thousands of observations made from Cape Town, of nebulae, clusters of stars, double stars, the sun, etc., Sir John Herschel records that he observed V.1 ( CH10 - Caroline’s Nebula - the Sculptor Galaxy ) during two different “sweeps” and gave it the number 2345 in his South African catalogue. Sweeps: 646 - 20th November 1835; 733 - 12th September 1836 At the latitude of Feldhausen, and on these dates, the Sculptor galaxy would have been at an altitude around 80 degrees above the northern horizon when near the meridian ( which was where the telescope was pointed during Herschel’s “sweeps” ). The sight afforded from this location, with the Sculptor Galaxy almost at the zenith, must have been significantly brighter and clearer than the Herschels had thus far been granted from its location way down near the horizon south of Slough. .......... Other Obsevations by John Herschel from Cape Town Also observed by John Herschel in 1835 were the people and animals that inhabit the moon ... The Great Moon Hoax of 1825 - “Lunar Animals and other Objects, Discovered by Sir John Herschel in his Observatory at the Cape of Good Hope ... “
  18. Aenima

    ngc7000red ha -

    From the album: CCD venture

    A h-alpha shot of the Wall section of NGC7000 aka north america nebula. ED80 - ATK16HR - Ha clip filter - EQ6 - finderguider 9x50mm PhD2 - photoshop - DSS.

    © 2016JayBird

  19. From the album: My astronomy kit

    I got aperture fever in early 2012 and got this 10" Dobsonian, which has quickly become my telescope of choice for back garden observing. Excellent on the planets, deep sky, you name it. Love this telescope.
  20. From the album: My astronomy kit

    My 4" refractor - great for wide field stuff, and a fab grab-and-go
  21. Williams Optics Star 71 (Mk I) f/4.9. This was bought from FLO back in January 2016. It has been used for imaging in an observatory. The Mk II Star 71 version is only 4 elements – this is the 5 element original version. The focal length is 350 mm, so it gives outstanding widefield views. Because this is a modified Petzval there is no need for flatteners, reducers and no need to work out ‘spacing’. It comes with a Vixen dovetail and a Canon T2 adapter is included. The scope was supplied in a padded Williams Optics carry bag and it is highly portable. Please note that if you want to use this scope for visual work a specially designed 1.25” diagonal is required. Normal diagonals cannot be used because of the rear lens elements. As I say, this scope was used solely for imaging and we did not try it visually. There were some QC problems with the Mk I - some versions of this scope were poor and could not be corrected. Indeed, the first version we obtained was returned because we were not happy with it. This is a good copy - I have attached a couple of sample images - also https://www.astrobin.com/275291/E/?nc= £750 including delivery. I’d prefer payment by bank transfer. The scope is also up for sale on UK ABS. I'll be puting the Lakeside focuser unit I used with this up for sale separately.
  22. 21st April: Re-processed to better show the colour of the fainter stars ... ....... Shimmering like a pearl to the naked eye, this open cluster of mostly young blue stars ( known as the "Pearl Cluster" ) is approximately 5500 light years from Earth and was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1752 from South Africa. This HDR image is constructed from 11 sets of exposures ranging from 1/4 sec ( to capture the centre of the brighter stars ) through to 240 seconds ( for the fainter stars of the Milky Way ). Total exposure time was around 5 hours. A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 " The Pearl Cluster" ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be found here ) 12 April 2018 ..... Image details: Field of view ..... 58' 49.8" x 39' 36.4" Image center ...... RA: 11 36 03.890 Dec: -61 35 30.17 Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 12 April 2018 ): 11 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/4s to 240s ) all at ISO250. ( 70 x 240sec + 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 11 sets HDR combination Pixinsight April 2018
  23. The Cat's Paw Nebula ( NGC 6334 ) in Scorpius updated ( slight tweak to colour balance, a little brighter and tad more contrast ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here ) ...... original: ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here ) ……………………... Also known as the Bear Claw Nebula, NGC 6334 is an emission nebula near the scorpion's tail in the Scorpius constellation. Image details: Image centre ...... RA: 17 20 08.185 Dec: -35 52 30.91 Field of view ..... 57' 37.8" x 38' 51.8" Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( July 2018 ) 6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 168 x 4 min frames plus ~10 frames each for the shorter exposures Processing: Calibration: bias, dark and flat Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight July 2018
  24. hello! yesterday i got my telescope, BRESSER solarix 76/350! so yesterday i went outside around 9pm, I spotted Mars in the night sky very easily, I tried to aim my telescope towards it but... after like 10minutes, I still couldn't aim it ( I did choosed the ocular that had 40mm, biggest one I have ), then I gave up and decided to observe the core of the Andromeda Galaxy because it's way easier to aim at because of it's huge size.. Then huge clouds were coming and I decided to go back home with my telescope.. I did some research and there is a tool named "finderscope", but the problem is that my telescope doesnt have a rail or something that I can put a finderscope to, and im just asking if there is like a univseral finderscope or a finderscope that doesnt require to drill holes for screws, the only thing I observed yesterday was the sun( with my sun filter, I was pretty satisfied for a first time ) and the faint core of the Andromeda Galaxy/m31.. thanks for helping me!
  25. live polarex

    hi

    hi nice to meet you all
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