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Found 159 results

  1. Hello. So i am very new to the world of astronomy and i just want to stargaze. I would like a telescope to look at the Moon in decent detail and maybe some other planets too and some stars too. I type this to get some help. Below i have multiple options for telescopes. I am on a strict budget, under $50 and i want a telescope that just does the job. i do not need any extreme scope just one that'll do the things mentioned above. Here are the options: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/360-x-50mm-Reflective-Monocular-Astronomical-Telescope-Space-Spot-Scope-Tripod/132194688993?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D43781%26meid%3D9616727f6af84b67ad88a06df4fed9bb%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D152515267398 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Performance-700-76-Reflector-Astronomical-Telescope-NEW-UK-FAST-DELIVERY-/191464648175?hash=item2c942eadef:g:6gEAAOSwBahVaDII http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/900-60-Reflector-Astronomical-Newtonian-Performance-Telescope-60x900mm-Silver-/262966529588?hash=item3d3a06ce34:g:QRMAAOSwurZZNgwR Which one of those will be the most suitable for me and which one would you recommend. BTW, i live in Birmingham, UK.
  2. I could use some expert advice on purchasing my first telescope for astrophotography. I have been using my Canon 5DMIII and an Astrotrac and have decided to upgrade to a tracking EQ mount and telescope. At first to image with my Canon and later CCD. Currently I am considering three scopes: Sky-Watcher ProED (100mm doublet ED APO 900mm FL (f/9)), Meade Series 6000 (80mm Triplet ED APO 480mm FL (f/6)), Explore Scientific (102mm Triplet ED APO 714mm FL (f/7). Any opinions on which would be best for astrophotography of galaxies and nebula? Are there others that are better that I should consider? I have not selected a mount yet but something like the NEQ6. Thanks, Lloyd Linnell
  3. Good morning everyone, Just to start out, a little about me: I'm US Navy stationed in Sicily, Italy, originally from lower Alabama. I've always been an Astronomy geek, pointing out the stars and planets to friends at night....nothing beats a calm, windless, clean night out in the middle of the ocean. Other than what I've picked up over the years sky watching and reading, I've recently finished up my second semester of Astronomy so I have a decent understanding of the sky....but I know bare minimum about telescopes. I never owned my own telescope and it's been a while since I've looked through one. I did some research and almost bought an entry model celestron a few years bac, but didn't. I like to consider myself beyond beginner, so I'm looking for an intermediate level scope. I've done several telescope finders and seen several reviews. On a budget of under $1,000, but would rather stay closer to $500. I want to see the moon yes, but more interested in the planets and deep sky objects. I will be traveling with it...by traveling, I mean driving about an hour or more to get to a nice dark field. With that I've eliminated a dob, as an option. I'm looking for something that will fit in my car, and a grab n' go/no hassle. My main question is does a newtonion/reflector type require much maintenance? like if I pack it up and drive to spot am I going to be fumbling with it in the dark, trying to get a clear picture? I really want something no-hassle and spend more time viewing than aligning. The reflectors get more aperture for the money over refraction type. Astrophotography is possible, once I get more comfortable and can afford it, ill get a mount, but other than that a simple iPhone snap will suffice. That brings me to my next point, I'd like to explore and would rather spend the money for a good view, than the motorized mounts. Are the motorized mounts really worth it? I also planned on getting a eye-piece/filter kit. So, I've narrowed it down to the Celestron Omni XLT 120mm- the entire Omni line keeps popping up best reviewed/high rated lists; The Orion SkyView Pro 8". Like I said I also plan on getting a filter/eyepiece kit. Any other options or are these good?: no-hassle, decent deep sky/good planet view, $500-$1000 budget (including eye-piece kit), fit in a car. It's my first telescope, so I want the best bang for the buck, not a beginner scope. I'm an adept learner so I'm not scared off by non-computerized mounts (and I want to learn to use without it). Thank you for the help!
  4. Hi I have a Sky-Watcher telescope, model AC 120/600 Startravel BD AZ-3 that I want to use to take photographies. This one: http://www.astroshop.eu/skywatcher-telescope-ac-120-600-startravel-bd-az-3/p,16710 I have an "old"(2009 model) Nikon D3100 camera and a t-ring, but the thing is that my camera won't read the t-ring. I read online that it's too old to be compatible with a t-ring. So I wondered if anyone knows about any camera models I can use? I'm thinking about getting a new camera because of this and I would like some recommendations. Which cameras do you know are able to "read" a t-ring? I would prefer the cheapest models Thank you for your time
  5. I have acquired an old 1960s Newtonian telescope which I am reconditioning as part of my STEM Ambassador volunteer work with a school in Bury St Edmunds. It's currently I my garden but when it's in a fit enough state it will move to the school grounds and hopefully be the seed of a new Astronomy Club in the area. I've already started doing after-school solar system and rocket making/launching sessions, so hopefully the scope will grow the club into something accessible to many children in the area. The reason for the post is I'd like to discover more about the provenance of the scope, so I wondered if any SGL members would be able to help? The primary mirror is 300mm diameter, the secondary elliptical mirror is 63mm (minor dia) by 90mm (major dia). Estimated focal length 1560mm, so f/5.2-ish. The tube is 1.6metres from the back of the primary box to the front of the tube; the front tube is 390mm diameter. It stands on a massive concrete block, angled at 52 degrees, which takes 4 men to lift... So far I have stripped it down, cleaned the bearings and regreased them so it is useable. I successfully collimated it with a Cheshire - first light showed not much coma, so happy with that for now. The focuser is rather tired and it needs at least a RA drive to make it easy to use, and the primary needs recoating. I believe it originally came from Norwich Uni, but I have no details. If anyone recognises this magnificent instrument or knows anything about it, please let me know - it'd be great to share this with the school as excitement mounts! Current state, in need of a lick of paint Original state (old photo)
  6. This is an open project "Ubuntu Astronomy" for amateurs. Free Live DVD distributive designed for astronomy amateurs. This DVD contains different astronomical programs, for example: planetariums, image processing, astro-hardware control, INDI drivers, etc. Based on Ubuntu 16.04. You can download *.iso from its page https://sourceforge.net/projects/ubuntu-astronomy-16-04/
  7. Hey I am new to this forum, For now I am going to be heading towards (amateur astronomy hobbyist) till I finish my education and hopefully become an astronomer! I am really interested in astronomy,but sadly I miss the equipment ,My equipment for now is : Strong binoculars My eyes A kids toy telescope well, I really am most fascinated by galaxies and nebulae, so i am waiting (since 8 months) that my mum gets money and buys me a real telescope! So does anyone know any good cheap (100$-300$) telescopes which can see galaxies? If anyone would give me a link to buy it I would really appreciate it!
  8. I am new to using telescopes, and this is my first. I have assembled the telescope and can view an image on a nearby island (in the day) and the moon (at night). I can attach the camera however I just see a black image. I would love to be able to attach my camera to the telescope and capture what I am seeing! Not sure if I need to attach an adapter or fit a specific lens? Any help would be much appreciated! Many Thanks Alice
  9. Hi there! (Before reading, my English may not be the best, but I hope you'll understand what I mean and say) I'm currently looking for a telescope that will blow my mind (in a weird way). I've been a "fan" of the night sky since I was a little kid, now I'm 21 years old and I want to give the skies a try. So, the telescop I've been thinking about buying is the Sky-Watcher Explorer-150P(EQ3-2) F/750. To me it seems like a decent telescope for a beginner, but I have my questions to those who are experienced with telescopes and those of you who maybe own their own Sky Watcher Expl. 150P. Questions: 1. Is this a good beginners telescope? Please explain why it is, and why it might not be. 2. What will I be able to view with it? 3. Is this a telescope I can use to take pictures? If so, how can this be done? (Using a laptop or a digital camera?...or both?) 4. Is it difficult to take it with you and to operate it? 5. If you could please rate it from 1-5 (for beginners), where would you put it? Those are the questions I have right now, I might come back with more later. I'm hoping for friendly and informative replies that can help me decide. It's already pretty late here in Norway, so I'll be going to bed now, but I hope some of you can answer me within the next few days. Here's a link to a website I might be buying from: http://www.stjarnhusetonline.se/prod/telescopes/sky-watcher/newtonianreflectors/explorer150.html Have a great night. Much love from Norway.
  10. Hi, Bought celestron astromaster 13eq b4 2 days this is my first ever telescope..today for nearly 2 hrs i tried to point to the mars..but i couldn't point..i can see with naked eyes but could not find in telescope..it was very frustrating with eye pain,head pain...can u tell how to locate a star or anything with the s/w..what the numbers are in the eq mount??how to use the s/w and point to that particular object with those numbers??? please help..i saw only moon clearly... Thanks...
  11. Hi All, So we were down at my parent's at the weekend and I've been working on my ongoing project to refurbish my old telescope so my Dad can use it - a Tal M from 1994 (!). Here's a picture of this vintage 'scope: As you can see everything is fine except for the fact that one of the tube rings has shattered in a fall. I need to replace the second tube ring but have no idea how to go about it. The rings are cast iron, and here is a picture of the broken ring for reference: What I want to do is either: Mend the broken tube ring Replace the broken tube ring Find some other way of attaching the telescope to the mount. It's an 88mm / 3.5'' reflector. Really nice 'scope - we gave it a whirl to check the optics and got it pointed at Saturn and it still shows a lovely clear picture. My Dad was careful to keep the tube somewhere the dust wouldn't get to it. Which of the above options would be the best solution to fixing this fine telescope for my old Dad?! DD
  12. Hi. I am looking at buying a new scope. I am VERY limited for time. With a 60hour a week job and three kids, I do not have time for a full time hobby but i really want to do some of my own viewing but with as limited input and as much output as possible. I go to my local astro club but I want my own scope that will go in the boot of the car that I can take out and set up easily and see whats out there without too much trouble or having to spend lots of time learning. I know this sounds like lazyness but it really is time that limits me. I have recently found the Celestron Skyprodigy 6inch which initially sounded like the absolute perfect option for me. I have since read a few negative comments on here about the auto align being a 'gimmick' and a waste of money but it seems it would allow me to drive out somewhere and get going straight away and have it find objects for me with its auto tour funtions, after it has auto aligned. The other option would be the nexstar8 but I have had no experience with a goto before and do not know how to manually align and how long it takes and then how to find the objects. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Are the sky prodigy really no good? Or do you think they might actually have a use for people such as myself? Thank you Richard
  13. Hi folks, for all of you interested in Radio Astronomy, you might be interested on this. In the Island of Sardinia is being built a pretty nice Radio Telescope, 64 metres of diameter supporting frequencies between 0,3 to 100 GHZ. The project is financed by the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and the Italian Space Agency. It will be employed for Radioastronomy, Geodynamics and other space-related matters. Its management is shared between Cagliari Observatory, the Institute of Radioastronomy of Bologna, the ASI and others. I think the whole thing is stil not fully operative (the image below is a Live Feed updated every 10 minutes, look at the sky ), but should you spend any of your holidays in Sardinia, you are allowed to visit the site. Website: http://www.srt.inaf.it/ Wikipedia description: http://en.wikipedia....Radio_Telescope
  14. Hello stargazers! I am a 14.5 year old boy currently exploring the hobby of astronomy! My first Telescope is the Celestron Firstscope! This post is going to contain mostly everything i do from now on! i will occasionally post some tips and tricks as well as some images(rarely) I am soon getting a 8" dob , but that doesnt mean i wont be using the Celestron firstscope. Hopefully, one day i can look back to this and remember the beggining of my journey as i am intrested in studying astrophysics/ astronomy in university . And if not, i will continue exploring this hobby. So Lets start! Astro Journal #0 So this is almost everything i ve done so far, i have had the telescope for almost 3 weeks now and have used it quite oftenly. The first time i used it was in relatively okay skies,i had no idea what focusing was and just looked at unfocused stars for that day.I cant believe i had such ignorance! After i tried finding why the stars were like that, i finally unsterstood the purpose of the focuser! The next day i used it on the cresent Moon, it took me 10 minutes to find with the 20MM eyepiece supplied with the telescope XD. ( even though it was righ infront of me) It was quite nice! I was able to see some craters on it and focusing was pretty good. Then i turned to the 4mm eyepiece.(75x) mag it almost covered the entire fov. For some reason the 4mm eyepiece isnt able to focus very well in general. And it was kind of blurry , but still enjoyable! Here are some pictures i took with it: i continued viewing the moon for a couple of days, then i decided to do some nebula viewing. I was despirately trying to find orion,as the orion nebula was and Is my FAVOURITE Nebula, it took me some time to realise that what i thought was pegasus was actually orion 's belt and sword ?. The night i first observed orion was a full moon night. It took me around 3 minutes to find the orion nebula in the scope. I just happened to notice it because of accidental adverted vision. I ve heard of adverted vision , but hadnt had the chance to use it , until then. I had reasonably high expectations for a 3" reflector, and wasnt sure if i was looking at it or not. It looked like a faint colourless fuzzy blob. After reporting what i saw to the forum they assured me that i had indeed saw the orion nebula.( this all from quite light polluted skies!) Even though i had high expectations i was pretty satisfied with my views. 3 days after, the moon wasnt very visible so i went out to observe. What i saw amazed me. It was considerably brigher than before ,using adverted vision. The idea of looking at the nebula itself in combination with the even better view, astounded me.(in the same skies) I loved it!!!!!!!!!!! After some though i was very suprised that such a cheap instrument(got it for 60euros , but you can usually get it for around 50) can show you that much! Yesterday i woke up to see the moon venus and jupiter( I wasnt able to view the jupiter-venus conjuction because of clouds, same with the Super Blood Moon. Guess i gotta wait another 19 years ?). I was able to find venus before i left for school. it was okay with the 20mm eyepiece. I just didnt have the time to view it in the 4mm( i know the timing was very unfortunate , didnt want to miss the buss) Astro Journal #1 So here we are! Today! I used the telescope in my backyard(they skies are okay! i can make out around 50 stars in my fov (around 180 degrees) I took a view of the orion nebula! You know what they say! You ll never see less than you saw yesterday!(except if the seeing conditions are worse ?) I was able to see quite more using adverted vision than the first time! { For those who dont know, adverted vision is when you dont look directly at the object you are observing ,as the areas in your eyes that focus on something arent as light sensitive as the areas who do not. So this way you achieve better brightness and clarity } Then i took a look at Taurus! i noticed some stars and then headed right for The Pleiades! The Pleiades , filled the entire Fov of my telescope . It had a pretty clear view. I did not however notice any colour or blue tint surrounding the stars. I wasnt expecting much to begin with so that was okay! I took some pictures of the Orion nebula! This pictures indicate what you will see with bad seeing full moon some light pollution and no adverted vision. However, the results with clear skies, adverted vision and no moon will be WAY better , i Promise. Dark skies will help you the most when looking at Deep Sky Objects Also FOR BETTER VIEWS Dont forget to DARK ADDAPT: DARK ADDAPTATION ALLOWS THE EYE TO SEE MUCH FAINTER LIGHT . TO ACHIEVE DARK ADDAPTATION TRY AND SPENDING AROUND 30-40 MINUTES IN DARKNESS ( AND NO CLOSING YOUR EYES FOR 40 MINUTES WONT WORK) And be careful. Even a look at your cell phone will take the dark addaptation effect away. So if you want to see somehow, use red flash torches,as red is the lowest wavelenght in power. The views you will get on the orion nebula will be amazing! Guranteed!
  15. Hello, I'm looking to get myself a new telescope to get back outside and looking up. I currently have a Celestron Astromaster 130eq, however, I do not use it as much as it broke in a way where the mount and knobs cannot be fixed. I did enjoy using it, but now I am looking for a more convenient scope to use. I'm looking at smaller goto scopes around $400. I want to be able to take it with me anywhere, set it up in minutes, and get to observing without much hassle (punch in an object and have it be tracked). I'm currently looking at the two scopes below: Celestron NexStar 4se Celestron NexStar 130 SLT I realized the 130 is the same size as my current scope, but with its goto factor, I feel like I would use it a lot more. The 4se is very appealing due to its small form factor. In addition to the Solar System, I would like to be able to see some DSOs. As for the price, $400 is my comfort zone at the moment, but I'll consider going up or down based on recommendations. If anyone has any experience with the scopes above, or has a recommendation, please share your input. I would love to hear it as I really want to get back outside and observing. Thanks, Spriggs
  16. Hello I bought my first telescope last year (Celestron Nextar Evo 8), I've used it several times already and never had any problem with moving it/putting it together. Last night I was out doing some photography with my scope and at one point my glove came in contact with the corrector plate. I noticed a small smudge when I came back in. As it's my first scope I've tried to be very careful and got a little scared that it would affect the performance of it. Looking for a professional opinion on this. Does this need to be cleaned? Will it make a difference in my photography/visual? Added two pictures. Regards Brant
  17. Hello, so I bought my first telescope a few days ago, I bought a SkyWatcher 200p on a goto EQ5 mount, my first general impression is that I made a good decision, it was a bit over my budget, but I bought it second hand, and 8" with goto EQ5 is a good start in my opinion so far, as I won't need to replace is really soon. So I tried observing for 2 nights so far, I tried using it from my garden, and obviously its not amazing, but I live in a relatively small city with a decent light pollution. So the first night was pretty bad, it was really hard adapting to everything, learn how to use everything, my brother ripped by mistake the crosshair in the finderscope(I fixed it today tho, it was kinda loose before, so its even better now), and it was pretty hard. Today I read a little about the things that were harder to me, I tried to align my finderscope, and even tho Im unable to do it for some reason, I know where the finderscope leads me, so its a bit easier, I learned how to use my eyepieces better, managed to use the 2x barlow lens, I still couldn't figure how to really do all the aligning correctly such as polar align etc, but hopefully I'll learn that slowly. I also tried adjusting my goto mount, but I couldn't do it because when Im trying to do the star aligning I don't know yet which stars I should use, and trying to figure where each star is in a place that you're not even sure if you can see it because of light pollution is kinda hard, so I gave up on aligning the goto and just used it to move the mount sometimes to follow an object. The only object that I really saw was mars(I think), I couldn't see it very well tho, I tried using all my eyepieces(25mm, 10mm and 4mm) and my 2x, but it still wasn't really great. Im not expecting to see anything too well obviously, but I did except to see it a bit more zoomed and a bit more detailed than sort of orange lamp light, it makes me wonder what can I do about it, what do I need in order to see mars better? Is it because of the light pollution? Maybe the eyepieces? Something maybe Im doing wrong? Again, Im not expecting to see it like hubble pictures or anything, not even with details, but just see it a bit bigger and a bit more clear, this is a photo for example(took it with my phone and 10mm super eyepiece): One more thing is about the finderscope, when Im trying to adjust the finderscope, I simply can't adjust it enough to make it accurate, I need to loosen the screws to adjust it, but eventually the screw will just go out and the finderscope will still not be aligned with the scope, what can I do about it? I have a lot more to learn and experience, so sorry if I ask really stupid questions etc, thanks a lot for the help!
  18. My apologies for the weather we're currently experiencing, completely my fault quite clearly. Getting delivered on Sunday so I can finally get out and start imaging, although the only thing I currently possess is an unmodded D5300, intervalometer, and a t-ring (somewhere.) Pretty sure looking at this there's no tracking/guiding ability at the present time, but looking to add that at a future point. With the current setup, or not breaking the bank too much more, what's the best I can hope for?
  19. The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) Bright Nebula NGC 6188 and open cluster NGC 6193 are embedded 4,300 light years away in the Sagittarius arm of our Milky Way galaxy and can be seen with the naked eye south of Scorpius in the constellation of Ara. With powerful stellar winds and energetic ultra-violet radiation, massive stars sculpt the interstellar gas and dust of the nebula into wonderful shapes and cause the interstellar gas to brightly fluoresce. Closer to the hot young stars of the cluster, bright blue “sunlight” reflects off the clouds of gas and dust to produce the blue reflection nebulae seenin the image. Magnitude +5.19, RA 16h 41m 42s, Dec -48deg 48' 46". Approx. 3800 light years away. Image details: This is an HDR image constructed from exposures ranging from 2 seconds to 240 seconds in length. The aim was to capture the faint stars and details in the nebula whilst at the same time maintaining colour in the bright stars without clipping the highlights. Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.336 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 90.002 deg ( North is to the right ) Focal ............. 1475.57 mm Pixel size ........ 9.56 um Field of view ..... 58' 28.5" x 39' 0.8" Image center ...... RA: 16 40 09.903 Dec: -48 41 27.00 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture ( 24 June 2017 ). 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO800. 34 x 240s + 10 each @ 2s to 120s. Processing ( Pixinsight - 19 Aug 2017, 13 Jan 2018 ). Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 8 sets. HDR combination. ......... This is a reprocessed version using the data I captured earlier in the year...
  20. “The Blue Bunny Nebula” .......... Edit: 27 Jan 2018 - updated again to try to draw more faint nebulosity out of the background; ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ......... Edit: 24 Jan 2018 - stars a little brighter and tighter with no change to the rest of the image ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ................. original: Thor's Helmet ( NGC 2359 ) in the constellation Canis Major Thor’s Helmet ( Duck Nebula, NGC 2359 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) This HDR image shows the bright nebula Thor’s Helmet in a sea of colourful stars against a background of red from dust and HA emissions. The stars in this image range from the brightest ( bottom right, HD 56501 ) at magnitude +7.7 to around +20 or more. HDR capture and processing allows all of the stars to be portrayed in colour without any burnt-out highlights. The colours of the stars and nebula are as close as I can get them to their "true colours" by using a "daylight colour balance" and allowing for the extinction of blue-green due to atmospheric absorption/scattering ( mean altitude during capture ~ 60deg ). The blue star in the centre of the bubble of expanding stellar material is HD 56925 ( WR7 ) - a massive, unstable and short-lived Wolf-Rayet star that one day will detonate in a supernova. Image details: NGC 2359 Thor’s Helmet / Duck Nebula: Magnitude +11.5, RA (2000.0) 7h 15m 37s, Dec -13deg 12' 8", approx. 1800 light years away HD 56925 / Wolf-Rayet 7 ( WR7 ) ( blue 11.5 mag star at centre of “bubble” ) Haffner 6 ( open ster cluster centre left of image ) Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.318 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Focal ............. 1398.41 mm Field of view ..... 57' 40.8" x 38' 29.0" Image center ...... RA: 07 18 36.509 Dec: -13 11 53.38 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 18 & 19 Jan 2018 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 116 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s Processing ( Pixinsight - 20 Jan 18 ) Calibration: master bias, master dark and master flat Integration in 9 sets HDR combination arcSinH stretch
  21. I often browse local classified ads for the odd person selling their scope for a great price, today I sort of hit the jackpot, i was browsing as usual and saw an 8” LX200 GPS that had just been posted (I’ll get to price later) so I call the fellow up who is an old timer saying he cannot lift it anymore and must let it go. I make my way there, an hour drive, and there is this pristine LX200, the man was such a nice old fellow who enjoyed the scope for years. The optics look perfect, I gave it a shot at terrestrial viewing looking for the usual things like excessive mirror flop. All seems great, computer and motors humming nicely, never been tampered with, plus it has a micro focusser and a hand controller which was a year old cause he stepped on the original in the dark of night. It came with 3 eyepieces (Meade low end) regardless, I can’t believe it’s esthetic condition, it looks like it rolled off the line yesterday. Best of all, I handed over what he asked no questions, the equivalent of U.S. $450, now I think that’s a deal!! After handing him the cash (not before) and thanking him profusely lol, I asked him why he was selling for less than what he could have asked, to which he replied, “look at my Home son, money is not my concern, I just want to see someone enjoy it like I did” sure enough I could place my entire home in one of his bedrooms haha. Amazing person, there are still good people out there!
  22. This is a 6" f/5.9 refractor (890mm focal length). It is constructed from high quality Japanese Ohara and German Schott glass with top quality coatings. This has the large 3" rotatable focuser. It can accept a 2" or a 1.25" diagonal. It comes with a carrying handle and a vixen dovetail bar. As you can see there is some of the usual scuffing on the dovetail bar. No doubt you have seen the reviews of this scope. We have gone a bit berzerk over the last few months and have run out of scope shelves, so this one needs to go. We bought it new around 18 months ago direct from Altair Astro. It has seen minimal use what with one thing or another. £590 preferably by bank transfer. The box and packing material has gone the way of all things. As such, this would need to be collected. I don't mind driving to meet someone half-way if necessary.
  23. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) ......... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 14 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/30th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 22 x 240sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 14 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  24. The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) is an open cluster of mostly hot young blue-white stars that appears to the unaided eye as a bright 4th magnitude star close to the Southern Cross. Only visible from southern latitudes, the Jewel Box was first recorded by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1751 and was later described by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones" - hence the name "Jewel Box". The Jewel Box open star cluster ( ngc 4755 ) in Curx ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Please see here for image details.
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