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Found 181 results

  1. My Lunt LS60 is finally back from Lunt where i had it retrofitted from tilt to pressure tuned, haven't had a chance to use it yet due to horrible seeing but for everyone interested i will be doing an in depth review of the new retrofit. I must say though that it certainly looks impressive and tuning seems to be very smooth upon turning the cylinder.
  2. My image of Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) has been published as the NASA APOD for the 11th of July 2017 https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170711.html Link to full size image on NASA site ( warning quite large - 4620 x 3720 ) Link to discussion of image on asterisk.apod.com ( credit apod.nasa.gov ) ( full size image - 4620 x 3720 ) Link to original post for this image back on the 10th of June
  3. I'm looking for a Vixen FL80(s) with a GP mount or even without. Like here http://scopeviews.co.uk/VixenFL80S.htm Thanks for any advice about possible clues where to get one!
  4. I have been chasing a good collimation for a week now. When using high powered eyepiece they don't look like this below. The centration is the same but, it is filled with eye reflections etc. This is with a 4X Powermate and ASI 174 M/C camera. When I focus in on the star the Airy Disk is hard to see due to seeing I hope or I'm still not collimated fully. The first is the defocused star and the second is focused. Advice/comments are welcome . I'm seeking feedback on whether I have achieved a good collimation. My planetary targets were either down or oculted by objects.
  5. Hi everyone. So I'm interested in grinding my first mirror and building my first telescope. I've been reading all that I can about telescopes and watching videos on YouTube. What I want to make is what would probably be best described as a Nasmyth Cassegrain style telescope. My initial idea is to use a 12 inch parabolic primary ground to a focal ratio of 15 and a flat secondary. With a 15 foot focal length the end result will be approximately a 9 foot tube, which is fine, that's actually what I want. I don't care that it won't fit in the trunk of my car, it's not an issue. After reading some articles I've learned that most Cassegrain style telescopes use a convex secondary and a steeper curvature on the primary. Would this be better? Would aberrations be worse with a flat secondary? I want as sharp of an image as I can get without sacrificing either aperture or focal length. It seems intuitive to me that a faster primary would result in a poorer image than using an f15 with a flat secondary...thoughts?
  6. Hello. So i am very new to the world of astronomy and i just want to stargaze. I would like a telescope to look at the Moon in decent detail and maybe some other planets too and some stars too. I type this to get some help. Below i have multiple options for telescopes. I am on a strict budget, under $50 and i want a telescope that just does the job. i do not need any extreme scope just one that'll do the things mentioned above. Here are the options: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/360-x-50mm-Reflective-Monocular-Astronomical-Telescope-Space-Spot-Scope-Tripod/132194688993?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D43781%26meid%3D9616727f6af84b67ad88a06df4fed9bb%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D152515267398 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Performance-700-76-Reflector-Astronomical-Telescope-NEW-UK-FAST-DELIVERY-/191464648175?hash=item2c942eadef:g:6gEAAOSwBahVaDII http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/900-60-Reflector-Astronomical-Newtonian-Performance-Telescope-60x900mm-Silver-/262966529588?hash=item3d3a06ce34:g:QRMAAOSwurZZNgwR Which one of those will be the most suitable for me and which one would you recommend. BTW, i live in Birmingham, UK.
  7. Hello everyone, I decided to take the big step and send my tilt tuned Lunt LS60 to Arizona for a pressure tune retrofit, cost $500 US but after reading countless opinions from pressure tune users I decided it would be worth the dough. Cant wait to get it back now, turnaround time is about 30 days or less they tell me, oh man I wanna see now, god I hate waiting for things!.
  8. Hi all, As the title says, is it possible to make my own triplet apochromatic refractor? I've made my own Newtonian reflector before, and I've heard of people making their achromatic refractor, but what are the difficulties of making a triplet apochromatic refractor? Thanks! Fishie
  9. Hello I have recently brought my first telescope and am looking to upgrade the eye pieces. I have a celestron powerseeker 127eq and was wondering which eyepiece set would best suit the telescope for planets and galaxies. Thanks.
  10. I looked and looked at countless reviews, forums and "Best Of..." articles every single night for 3 MONTHS, not exaggerating. I wanted to make the best decision and not experience buyer's remorse or wish I would have gotten "that other one" after my purchase. I changed my mind several times; I thought I wanted a refractor...I thought I wanted a Newt...I thought I wanted a dob...I didn't think I wanted a go-to mount...The list goes on. So many choices, so many opinions. And then the light came unexpectedly in the form of yet another random article called "So You Wanna Buy a Telescope... Advice for Beginners". The part that got me says, "Finally, avoid "paralysis-by-analysis." If you spend more than an hour a day reading telescope catalogs, you are probably in this category. Just get something; you'll feel a lot better." After reading that I sat back and thought, "You know what? He's right". So I did. even though I went over my budget I still felt GREAT. My seemingly never-ending search was finally over. Do yourself a favor and JUST GET SOMETHING!! Of course, always do your homework on what your buying first! I settled on the Celestron 8se (not even close to what I originally had in mind). It came in today, and best of all...0 cloud cover predicted tonight! I'm itching for the Sun to hit the horizon as I type this so I can test it out. Best of luck to you all.
  11. Hi guys I currently own a 12" skywatcher collapsible dobsonian but need to upgrade now to have goto functionality. It is way to expensive for me though and I can only spend up to 1200 AUD ~ 900 USD. Could anyone please help me think of some alternatives, to track and remotely control my dob? Thanks guys!!
  12. Hi, I was asked on a Swedish forum to put an "Astronomical Dictionary" on my homepage. I have made a test page in an easy form. Astronomical related words linked to wikipedia. It aims to the beginners in astronomy so it should not be too complicated words. http://astrofriend.eu/astronomy/astronomical-dictionary/astronomical-dictionary.html Let me know if it's useful and and I shall add more words. /Lars
  13. Hey folks, I know this might seem like a stupid question but I am about to buy myself my first telescope and I am confused by the telescope itself being much shorter then the stated focal length (The focal length is supposedly 1000mm, but the telescope itself is like 40cm). I've spent hours on the internet trying to find out as much about telescopes as I could but I didn't find any page that would answer this question. Thanks in advance
  14. Yesterday i viewed jupiter with my celestron astromaster 130eq telescope with 10mm eyepiece..the planet looked very small but could could see clearly but i want to see enlarged ...what eyepiece can i use.. or my telescope capacity is only this much?
  15. When the barrel of my meridian 675x4.5" reflector telescope falls below around 30 degrees it just falls down, and will only come back up above 35 degrees. This makes it impossible to observe objects towards the horizon. Any help would be much appreciated.
  16. So I'm on the lookout for a first scope and I found an advertisement for a Meade 2060 LX6 in my local classifieds for $675 CAD. I tried looking up this particular scope and it seems that it's an older model, so there isn't much to be found in the way of reviews or manufacturer information. Does anyone have experience with this type of scope? Would it be good for a beginner? It's just a little above my price range, considering that I was looking into getting a SkyWatcher 8" dob ($550 CAD). It seems as if the guy is offering a mount a fork mount along with it, as well as some other accessories. Here's the original text of the ad: Clean MEADE 2080 LX6 wide field schmidt cassegrain telescope with Meade wedge (with fine tune knob), heavy field tripod (large enough for 10"), Meade LX6 quarts drive fork mount with Hand box and Meade dec motor installed, 8x50 finder, piggy back mount and choices of either a celestron visual back and diagonal (1.25) plus a Vixen 20mm NPL eyepiece or Celestron Plossl 26mm. OR a Meade 2" hybrid back with 1.25" insert one one of the above eyepieces and front cap. Note: front cap does not sit fully as I have replaced the collimation screws with knobs for easier collimation. I can put the original screws back in for you but you collimate. The inner coating on the corrector plate is faded in one section from a cleaning years ago. No idea why that happened but dos not effect viewing so never bothered me. The LX6 line-up was designed with a bright f6.3 Multi coated optical group (1280mm fl) as opposed to the usual f10 2100+/- set ups in most 8" sct scopes. These were designed for brighter, wide field viewing where nebulae, star fields and the like were more targeted than high-power planetary viewing and are great for imaging purposes. That said, lots of aperture for higher power eyepieces and the Saturn rings are easily made out even from my part-country location at 26x or more. Venus in phase is brilliant (it is in phase now with a lower crescent position.) $675 for set up 1 and $775 for set-up 2. These are not toys. This is not a goto. Also includes Meade travel case and literature. Located 1/2 hr west of NewMarket. Thanks.
  17. Good evening everyone, I'm looking into buying my first telescope. Interested in planets and DSOs. I've narrowed it down to 2 scopes: the Orion SkyView Pro 8" reflector and the Celestron Omni XLT 150 refractor. A few people on here highly suggest the SkyView pro 8", but I'm curious as to how much maintenance is going to come with it? I'm American living in Sicily, so it's not easy for me to go to a shop and ask for help! From the price and high ratings of it, it's very appealing. But on the other hand I understand the refractors require almost nothing, just keep the lens clean. Any comments?? Thanks
  18. Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) by Mike O'Day. The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) is the largest and brightest emission nebula in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). At a distance of 160,000 light years away from us, the Tarantula Nebula is so bright that it would cast shadows on the Earth if were as close to us as the Orion Nebula in our galaxy. New version ( April 9 ): ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper image ) ............ Older versions: And here it is re-processed to try to reduce the red background ( due to light pollution I think ) without impacting the colour of the stars too much ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Details: Nebulae: NGC 2070 Tarantula Nebula NGC 2048 NGC 2060 NGC 2077 Open clusters: NGC 2042 NGC 2044 NGC 2050 NGC 2055 NGC 2091 NGC 2093 NGC 2100 Image centre ... (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arcmin): ... Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture ): 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Filter: none. Exposures: 100 sub exposures ranging from 1s 100ISO to 240Sec 400ISO HDR processing of 5 sets of images Pixinsight & Photoshop 20 December 2016 / April 2017
  19. I got a few recommendations from Sky Watcher that seemed reasonable: http://skywatcherusa.com/ed-apo-refractors/proed-doublet-apo-refractors/proed-80mm-doublet-apo-refractor.html http://skywatcherusa.com/maksutov/sky-watcher-maksutov-cassegrain-102mm.html http://skywatcherusa.com/maksutov/sky-watcher-maksutov-cassegrain-127mm.html The 80mm looked fairly tasty but I don't really know if a refractor is the right choice for the AllView. I really wanted to step up to the 100mm refractor but it is to long for the mount. Sky Watcher indicated there may be a competitors 100mm that might be short enough but... isn't the 100mm designation the width of the tube or the length of the internals? Could i find a better choice than the ones listed or should I just pony up for the 80? For that matter I dont even know if the 127mm Mak-Cass would be the better choice. I want to be able to see as far as possible. I want Saturn's rings, the great spot of jupiter, and potentially some galaxy, nebula or whatever is reasonable for that telescope. Some fov would be nice but I am beginning to gather that that is a trade off. I made a questionable purchase of the AllView, pleasse help me maximize it's usefulness. thanks Jonathan
  20. Hi there, have recently acquired an Alt-Az mount: and am contemplating attaching an inclinometer as a means of getting in the ball-park of an object in terms of Altitude. Most decent inclinometers on the market use a magnet for attachment, unfortunately there is a distinct lack of ferrous metal in my kit, the only element apart from screws with magnetic capability is the Vixen counter-weight. Interested to find out how other people might have tackled this situation. Encoders and DSCs not an option at this moment in time, although will look to go down this route sometime in the future however at this point would probably look to swap out the Sabre for something like an AYO Digi II. Kind Regards Paul J.
  21. I am a newbie and want to know how to view Jupiter. When I do this myself, when I start focusing it becomes smaller and brighter and I am not able to observe the bands. PowerSeekerAZ.pdf
  22. Good morning everyone, Just to start out, a little about me: I'm US Navy stationed in Sicily, Italy, originally from lower Alabama. I've always been an Astronomy geek, pointing out the stars and planets to friends at night....nothing beats a calm, windless, clean night out in the middle of the ocean. Other than what I've picked up over the years sky watching and reading, I've recently finished up my second semester of Astronomy so I have a decent understanding of the sky....but I know bare minimum about telescopes. I never owned my own telescope and it's been a while since I've looked through one. I did some research and almost bought an entry model celestron a few years bac, but didn't. I like to consider myself beyond beginner, so I'm looking for an intermediate level scope. I've done several telescope finders and seen several reviews. On a budget of under $1,000, but would rather stay closer to $500. I want to see the moon yes, but more interested in the planets and deep sky objects. I will be traveling with it...by traveling, I mean driving about an hour or more to get to a nice dark field. With that I've eliminated a dob, as an option. I'm looking for something that will fit in my car, and a grab n' go/no hassle. My main question is does a newtonion/reflector type require much maintenance? like if I pack it up and drive to spot am I going to be fumbling with it in the dark, trying to get a clear picture? I really want something no-hassle and spend more time viewing than aligning. The reflectors get more aperture for the money over refraction type. Astrophotography is possible, once I get more comfortable and can afford it, ill get a mount, but other than that a simple iPhone snap will suffice. That brings me to my next point, I'd like to explore and would rather spend the money for a good view, than the motorized mounts. Are the motorized mounts really worth it? I also planned on getting a eye-piece/filter kit. So, I've narrowed it down to the Celestron Omni XLT 120mm- the entire Omni line keeps popping up best reviewed/high rated lists; The Orion SkyView Pro 8". Like I said I also plan on getting a filter/eyepiece kit. Any other options or are these good?: no-hassle, decent deep sky/good planet view, $500-$1000 budget (including eye-piece kit), fit in a car. It's my first telescope, so I want the best bang for the buck, not a beginner scope. I'm an adept learner so I'm not scared off by non-computerized mounts (and I want to learn to use without it). Thank you for the help!
  23. NGC 2014 and Dragon's Head nebula in the Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) not far from the Tarantula Nebula by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ). This image shows multiple bright nebula and star clusters in an area adjacent to the The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). The largest of these are the bright pink nebula in the mid-right part of the image ( NGC 2014 ) and the blue nebula in the lower middle ( NGC 2030 ). ..... Updated image - reprocessed to impove colour balance ( April 15th ) ( please click / tap on image to see it larger and sharper ) .... Original: ( click on image to see larger and clearer ( grrr... image compression in version above )) ---------- This is the first image captured as part of a new image capture and processing workflow I am trying out... Roger Clark ( http://www.clarkvision.com/articles/index.html ) has a number of articles addressing colour processing and the performance of modern DSLR sensors. The "take homes" for me have been: 1. With a modern sensor ( one with on-sensor dark current suppression technology ) one may not need to capture dark frames ( in order to remove the now non-significant pattern noise ). 2. "Correct" white balance processing should start by using "daylight" RBG channel multipliers ( to get the star colour 'right') and any histogram adjustment to improve white balance of darker parts of the image should involve aligning the left side of histogram curves ( ie. not the peaks ) So, the workflow to produce the image above involves calibraiton with Superbias & Master Flat but no dark frame subtraction (neither post nor in-camera). Roger Clark speaks of using a "bad pixel map" as the basis of reducing hot pixels. I have not figured out how to produce one yet. However, with a little bit of dithering during guiding ( and the very busy image ) the hot pixels that are in the image below are not too overwhelming. With regard to colour balance; I tried using the "daylight" factors reported by the camera but these resulted in an image and stars that were quite blue. This image was based on the factors reported by DXOMark for the Nikon D5300 ( R x 2.12, G x 1, B x 1.49 ( D50 standard )). This was better but I still felt the need for a final tweak in Photoshop ( colourBalance Highlights +15 Cyan/Red, -5 Magenta/Green ) to improve the colour in the stars and mid-tones. { DXOMark "white balance scales" for D5300 found at: https://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Nikon/D5300---Measurements on the "color response" tab } --------- Details: Bright Nebulae: NGC 2014 ( upper right, pink) size 30 x 20 arcmin Mag +8 NGC 2020 size 2.0 arcmin ( small blue-green oval nebula ) NGC 2030 NGC 2032 ( Dragon's Head nebula - blue, central bottom of image ) NGC 2035 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin NGC 2040 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin Open clusters: NGC 2004 size 2.7 arcmin Mag +9.6 NGC 2011 size 1 arcmin Mag +10.6 NGC 2021 size 0.9 arcmin Mag +12.1 Annotated : Image centre RA 05h 33m 32.362s, Dec -67° 32' 18.145" (nova.astrometry.net) Orientation: up is west, right is South Field of view (arcmin): 58.8 x 39.2 Scale (full size image) 0.585 arcsec/pixel Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 120mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Format: 14bit NEF Noise reduction: off Filter: none HDR combination of seven sets of exposures (20 & 22 Feb 2017): 58 x 240 sec ISO 800 8 x 120 sec ISO 800 8 x 60 sec ISO 800 8 x 30 sec ISO 800 8 x 14 sec ISO 800 8 x 7 sec ISO 800 8 x 3 sec ISO 800 Pixinsight: 26 Feb 2017 Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay
  24. Hi, I have always had an interest in astronomy/stargazing. Looking up into a clear night sky wondering what it would be like to be out there is always a summers night pass time favorite of mine. Although, having a high interest in this area as a child I became otherwise engaged in other activities like playing console games, and then more recently raising my own young children. However, my interest in astronomy and stargazing has since returned and I have recently wanted to begin looking into the night sky with a telescope. I am a complete novice when it comes to this and just wondered what would be a good beginners scope. I have recently been interested in buying the Celestron Astromaster 130EQ. I have read numerous reviews about this scope and everyone says that its really good scope for beginners. I have looked at images that people have taken through this scope using additional filters and lenses and I am more than impressed with what can be achieved. I am completely new to telescopes and wouldn't really know where to start. I had a low-grade telescope as a child, branded National Geographic which was great for looking at the moon with, it came with 2 lenses. I still have it but would prefer a 'more advanced', 'more profesional' scope. Any help/tips would be great. I have a maximum budget for this of £250GBP but could stretch to £300GBP Thanks all.
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