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Found 181 results

  1. Hi all, I saw recently this telescope on amazon : here It's cheap .. cheaper than the binoculars in fact! Would it be a good telescope? what can possibly go wrong ? https://www.amazon.de/700-76-Teleskop-Pack-Smartphone-Adapter/dp/B01I3BWICA/ref=sr_1_1?s=ce-de&ie=UTF8&qid=1527263025&sr=1-1&keywords=700-76+Teleskop+Big+Pack Link edited
  2. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades open star cluster ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Image details can be found here.
  3. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) ......... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 14 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/30th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 22 x 240sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 14 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  4. The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) is an open cluster of mostly hot young blue-white stars that appears to the unaided eye as a bright 4th magnitude star close to the Southern Cross. Only visible from southern latitudes, the Jewel Box was first recorded by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1751 and was later described by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones" - hence the name "Jewel Box". The Jewel Box open star cluster ( ngc 4755 ) in Curx ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Please see here for image details.
  5. The Jewel Box ( NGC 4755 ) is an open cluster of mostly hot young blue-white stars that appears to the unaided eye as a bright 4th magnitude star close to the Southern Cross. Only visible from southern latitudes, the Jewel Box was first recorded by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1751 and was later described by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones" - hence the name "Jewel Box". The Jewel Box Open Cluster ( ngc 4755 ) in the Crux constellation. ( please click / tap to see larger and sharper ) ........... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) image Plate Solver script version 5.0 =========== Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.000 deg Focal ............. 1375.43 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 49.3" x 39' 17.8" Image center ...... RA: 12 53 40.040 Dec: -60 21 02.81 ========== Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 11 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8th sec to 120 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 10 x 120sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 11sets HDR combination
  6. Hi, I want to place a CCD camera where the secondary mirror is, remove the sec. mirror completely. It,s a home made F5 14 inch. Do I have to use a coma corrector or/and a field flattener? Can I use a Barlow with a field flattener or coma corrector, can I use eye piece projection with a field flattener or coma corrector? Many thanks, Markus
  7. This is a 6" f/5.9 refractor (890mm focal length). It is constructed from high quality Japanese Ohara and German Schott glass with top quality coatings. This has the large 3" rotatable focuser. It can accept a 2" or a 1.25" diagonal. It comes with a carrying handle and a vixen dovetail bar. As you can see there is some of the usual scuffing on the dovetail bar. No doubt you have seen the reviews of this scope. We have gone a bit berzerk over the last few months and have run out of scope shelves, so this one needs to go. We bought it new around 18 months ago direct from Altair Astro. It has seen minimal use what with one thing or another. £590 preferably by bank transfer. The box and packing material has gone the way of all things. As such, this would need to be collected. I don't mind driving to meet someone half-way if necessary.
  8. Williams Optics Star 71 (Mk I) f/4.9. This was bought from FLO back in January 2016. It has been used for imaging in an observatory. The Mk II Star 71 version is only 4 elements – this is the 5 element original version. The focal length is 350 mm, so it gives outstanding widefield views. Because this is a modified Petzval there is no need for flatteners, reducers and no need to work out ‘spacing’. It comes with a Vixen dovetail and a Canon T2 adapter is included. The scope was supplied in a padded Williams Optics carry bag and it is highly portable. Please note that if you want to use this scope for visual work a specially designed 1.25” diagonal is required. Normal diagonals cannot be used because of the rear lens elements. As I say, this scope was used solely for imaging and we did not try it visually. There were some QC problems with the Mk I - some versions of this scope were poor and could not be corrected. Indeed, the first version we obtained was returned because we were not happy with it. This is a good copy - I have attached a couple of sample images - also https://www.astrobin.com/275291/E/?nc= £750 including delivery. I’d prefer payment by bank transfer. The scope is also up for sale on UK ABS. I'll be puting the Lakeside focuser unit I used with this up for sale separately.
  9. 21st April: Re-processed to better show the colour of the fainter stars ... ....... Shimmering like a pearl to the naked eye, this open cluster of mostly young blue stars ( known as the "Pearl Cluster" ) is approximately 5500 light years from Earth and was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1752 from South Africa. This HDR image is constructed from 11 sets of exposures ranging from 1/4 sec ( to capture the centre of the brighter stars ) through to 240 seconds ( for the fainter stars of the Milky Way ). Total exposure time was around 5 hours. A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 " The Pearl Cluster" ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be found here ) 12 April 2018 ..... Image details: Field of view ..... 58' 49.8" x 39' 36.4" Image center ...... RA: 11 36 03.890 Dec: -61 35 30.17 Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 12 April 2018 ): 11 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/4s to 240s ) all at ISO250. ( 70 x 240sec + 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 11 sets HDR combination Pixinsight April 2018
  10. Decided to put cooling fans on my newtonians a 200pds and a 130pds ,used a 120mm on the 200 and a 80mm on the 130pds ,i used, Be Quite silent Wings2 fans they use rifle bearings and are so quite German made, i did the 200 first and was impressed with this make so ordered the same make for the 130 pds it comes with a lead with four wires but only needed neg ang pos so snipped other two out , made a disc from plastic and cut out around collimation screws on primary then used velcro to attach to OTA fitted a 2.1mm dc socket on to the disc then bought a usb lead to 2.1mm barrel though i may fit another 2.1mm socket on my power box and use 12v either way it works ,i used a dimmer on the 200pds but it doesnt need it and wouldn't use it again but its fitted now so will leave in place.
  11. Hi Guys, I wondered if it's possible to attach a mirrorless camera (that is a camera that is not able to remove it's lens) to a telescope. Is there an attachment or a camera holder? Luminous Thank you, in advance
  12. Hi, I am doing an end of degree project on variable stars due next thursday and London's weather does not allow finish it. I was wondering if someone would do me the favour of observing the pulsating variable star V0460 Andromeda http://variablestars.net/stars/460/ in the Johnson R filter, for a period of 1 hour and 50 minutes? please? Thanks so much!
  13. Looks like my Lipo project so far may be working good, ran a trial last night with a 3200Mah 3 cell Lipo from my RC airplane, the battery is an 11.1V nominal charge (uncharged) but charges up to 12.6V (4.2V per cell fully charged). All Lipo batteries display nominal charge capacity, which can be misleading because when charged, they jump up in voltage past displayed voltage. I wanted to see how long that went for before using one of my larger 5000Mah batts, didn’t take much more than $5 for a 2.5mm connector with 6ft cable included and a Deans connector on other end for the battery. I have a small voltage meter we RC guys use to monitor battery levels per cell and combined voltage, meter just keeps displaying levels constantly then emits a buzz when it drops to pre programmed level. The loud buzz I muffled to a pitiful hum by dropping some hot glue over the little speaker holes, last thing I need is an 80 decibel buzz at 2am in my yard. I set buzz for 3.5V per cell which is lowest you want to drain a Lipo per cell, after slewing around manually more times than I can remember I still had enough juice to slew around for another hour if i wanted, I was mimicking a nights slewing around and I think after I slewed around on both axis simultaneously on and off for 40 min I pretty much covered a nights worth. the test will be in the field, if this battery doesn’t cut it I’m sure the 5000Mah will do the trick. I was watching for any shenanigans from the scope as the level dropped but nothing, no glitches or twitching of the controller display, all remained solid. UPDATE: The next morning i turned on the scope (without recharging battery) and again spent the better part of an hour until i was just bored slewing the scope around, i was afraid to burn out a motor with constant back and forth slewing with a short pause of course. i am now convinced that this 3200mah battery not much bigger than the average candy bar will last a whole night out and more! fantastic to know that when i drag the scope out for short periods locally (won't need heat strip those times) that this battery will be fine. i was dreading having to take my 50Lb deep cycle marine battery every time id like to go for a short local 2hr outreach session, on those long drive dark sky all night sessions yes i will need heat and my marine battery but those a few compared to short local sessions. I can now fit my power supply into my pocket and that is just GOLD!!
  14. I often browse local classified ads for the odd person selling their scope for a great price, today I sort of hit the jackpot, i was browsing as usual and saw an 8” LX200 GPS that had just been posted (I’ll get to price later) so I call the fellow up who is an old timer saying he cannot lift it anymore and must let it go. I make my way there, an hour drive, and there is this pristine LX200, the man was such a nice old fellow who enjoyed the scope for years. The optics look perfect, I gave it a shot at terrestrial viewing looking for the usual things like excessive mirror flop. All seems great, computer and motors humming nicely, never been tampered with, plus it has a micro focusser and a hand controller which was a year old cause he stepped on the original in the dark of night. It came with 3 eyepieces (Meade low end) regardless, I can’t believe it’s esthetic condition, it looks like it rolled off the line yesterday. Best of all, I handed over what he asked no questions, the equivalent of U.S. $450, now I think that’s a deal!! After handing him the cash (not before) and thanking him profusely lol, I asked him why he was selling for less than what he could have asked, to which he replied, “look at my Home son, money is not my concern, I just want to see someone enjoy it like I did” sure enough I could place my entire home in one of his bedrooms haha. Amazing person, there are still good people out there!
  15. Hi I am very new to this and looking to buy my first telescope I dint have a very big budget and looking at a secondhand scope at first. I have come across this on eBay and was wondering what people think of it A Saxon 130 reflector telescope on an EQ2 mount and has motor drive it comes with 1.5x erecting eyepiece and a Super 10mm eyepiece Thanks in advance Ste
  16. hello... ^_=)/ I have a vintage telescope polarex Do telescope 100% by hand .... my question is can i do stars shooting ... with vintage camera OR digital camera have old camera leica R3 like to use it ????? thanks this is my blue star STAR KIT 1.tif
  17. live polarex

    hi

    hi nice to meet you all
  18. Hi guys This topic was opened to see if anyone can help me determine which operating system is compatible with the telescope control. I have a Skywatcher 130/650 I can not control my GoTo telescope and windows 7 but I can not see the planetarium program.
  19. Hi all, was just going through the garage to find something and had come across my dads old Celestron telescope the ,model of the scope says it’s a 21066 wos a. The focal length is 900mm and aperture is 2.3”. Was wondering if any of you knows something about this telescope? I’m guessing it’s not that great. here’s a few pictures of it. Olly.
  20. “The Blue Bunny Nebula” .......... Edit: 27 Jan 2018 - updated again to try to draw more faint nebulosity out of the background; ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ......... Edit: 24 Jan 2018 - stars a little brighter and tighter with no change to the rest of the image ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ................. original: Thor's Helmet ( NGC 2359 ) in the constellation Canis Major Thor’s Helmet ( Duck Nebula, NGC 2359 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) This HDR image shows the bright nebula Thor’s Helmet in a sea of colourful stars against a background of red from dust and HA emissions. The stars in this image range from the brightest ( bottom right, HD 56501 ) at magnitude +7.7 to around +20 or more. HDR capture and processing allows all of the stars to be portrayed in colour without any burnt-out highlights. The colours of the stars and nebula are as close as I can get them to their "true colours" by using a "daylight colour balance" and allowing for the extinction of blue-green due to atmospheric absorption/scattering ( mean altitude during capture ~ 60deg ). The blue star in the centre of the bubble of expanding stellar material is HD 56925 ( WR7 ) - a massive, unstable and short-lived Wolf-Rayet star that one day will detonate in a supernova. Image details: NGC 2359 Thor’s Helmet / Duck Nebula: Magnitude +11.5, RA (2000.0) 7h 15m 37s, Dec -13deg 12' 8", approx. 1800 light years away HD 56925 / Wolf-Rayet 7 ( WR7 ) ( blue 11.5 mag star at centre of “bubble” ) Haffner 6 ( open ster cluster centre left of image ) Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.318 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Focal ............. 1398.41 mm Field of view ..... 57' 40.8" x 38' 29.0" Image center ...... RA: 07 18 36.509 Dec: -13 11 53.38 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 18 & 19 Jan 2018 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 116 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s Processing ( Pixinsight - 20 Jan 18 ) Calibration: master bias, master dark and master flat Integration in 9 sets HDR combination arcSinH stretch
  21. Hello, I am trying to control my Heq5 pro via SynScan (ver 3.10) with Stellarium (on MS Win10, 64 bit). I got the proper cable and adapter to connect to the usb port (via an adaptor for the RS-232). In Stellarium I follow the instructions to add a telescope / configure / add new telescope but when I get at the level of the device settings (see image), the field to select the port is blank and cannot be edited. I know I am using port : Port_#0001.Hub_#0004 (from checking the device manager) on my laptop. I tried installing Ascom but I still can't find the port there neither. I tried using a different port #3 but same issue. Anyone knows a work around the issue? Thank you \\
  22. The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) Bright Nebula NGC 6188 and open cluster NGC 6193 are embedded 4,300 light years away in the Sagittarius arm of our Milky Way galaxy and can be seen with the naked eye south of Scorpius in the constellation of Ara. With powerful stellar winds and energetic ultra-violet radiation, massive stars sculpt the interstellar gas and dust of the nebula into wonderful shapes and cause the interstellar gas to brightly fluoresce. Closer to the hot young stars of the cluster, bright blue “sunlight” reflects off the clouds of gas and dust to produce the blue reflection nebulae seenin the image. Magnitude +5.19, RA 16h 41m 42s, Dec -48deg 48' 46". Approx. 3800 light years away. Image details: This is an HDR image constructed from exposures ranging from 2 seconds to 240 seconds in length. The aim was to capture the faint stars and details in the nebula whilst at the same time maintaining colour in the bright stars without clipping the highlights. Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.336 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 90.002 deg ( North is to the right ) Focal ............. 1475.57 mm Pixel size ........ 9.56 um Field of view ..... 58' 28.5" x 39' 0.8" Image center ...... RA: 16 40 09.903 Dec: -48 41 27.00 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture ( 24 June 2017 ). 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO800. 34 x 240s + 10 each @ 2s to 120s. Processing ( Pixinsight - 19 Aug 2017, 13 Jan 2018 ). Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 8 sets. HDR combination. ......... This is a reprocessed version using the data I captured earlier in the year...
  23. Greetings, Im new to the realms of astronomy and have just acquired my first telescope; an Orion Skyscanner 100m reflector. I've taken it out a few times using a childrens Ikea table as a mount and attempted some afocal photography using my Canon EOS 100D DSLR camera (without a great deal of success as can be expected!). Though I have a keen interest in astrophotgraphy, Im settling for simply viewing at this stage, with a view to purchasing a good mount in the future perhaps. Currently, I could benefit from a mount that is going to offer me some reasonable stability over a flimsy table that isnt going to cost the earth. Would an inexpensive EQ (such as the Orion EQ-1) be suitable or should I perhaps consider a simple camera tripod or Altazimuth? Any suggestions here would be welcome. And if anyone has suggestions on achieving some basic astrophotgraphy with my prospective equipment in mind, Id like to hear from them. Or if its best avoided entirely (which I highly expect) then Id also like to know. Thanks! Nathan
  24. The Rosette Nebula and Cluster ( NGC 2237 and 2244 ) in the constellation Monoceros edit: updated 30th Dec with improved colour balance and slightly increased brightness ... ...... original: ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Still a work-in-progress really... with only 10 x 4min exposures for the main 'lights' before the clouds came over. I will try to add some more data when the moon has gone I am still experimenting with how to get the best out of the D7500. With the very warm nights ( low to mid 20s all night ) the 'warm pixels' are very noticeable so I reverted to my old practice of in-camera dark subtraction. This worked quite well and produced a nice smooth noise floor in the integrated images - albeit at the expense of more exposures. ................. Identification: The Rosette Nebula ( NGC 2237 ) is a large, circular emission nebula in the constellation Monoceros. It surrounds a cluster of hot, young stars known as the Rosette Cluster ( NGC 2244 ). ( SkySafari ) NGC 2237, 2244 Caldwell 49, 50 North is up. .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 23 Dec 2017 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO400. 10 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s imaged ~ +/- 1.5hrs either side of meridian maximum altitude ~ 51.3 deg above north horizon Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and in-camera dark subtraction Integration in 9 sets HDR combination Image Plate Solution =================================== Resolution ........ 0.633 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.181 deg Focal ............. 1367.90 mm Pixel size ........ 4.20 um Field of view ..... 58' 59.4" x 39' 15.0" Image center ...... RA: 06 31 55.638 Dec: +04 56 30.84 ===================================
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