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Found 33 results

  1. Re-processed 12th August 2017 using the new PhotometricColorCalibration tool from Pixinsight. This function seeks to adjust the colour balance of the image by plate solving the image and comparing the colour of the stars in the image with the colour values for these stars as stored in various databases. ( please click / tap on image to see larger / sharper ) ................. Trifid Nebula ( M20, NGC 6514 ) I manged to capture another 60 odd 240sec images in late July to add to the data I captured at the end of June ( Trifid Nebula WIP ) Trifid Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 20, NGC 6514 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )' and a crop of the main part of the nebula ... I am quite pleased with how the colour balance turned out - especially the colours of the stars ( my goal has been to get the colours of the stars as close as I can to how they would look with "daylight" whitebalance and no light pollution / sky glow). ----------- "High Dynamic Range" ( HDR ) image of the Trifid Nebula - built from exposures ranging from 1/8 to 240 seconds in duration. Image details: from nova.astrometry.net: Size: 52.2 x 35.5 arcmins. Centre: 18h 2 min 30.8 sec, -22deg 57' 37.7''. Orientation: up is -88.2 East of North ( ie. E^ N> ). Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture: 12 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 12 sets. 105 x 240sec main image. 5 each for exposures 1/8 to 120sec - to caputure highlights. HDR combination using Pixinsight's PixelMath function.
  2. Hello everyone! I'm new here. So my question or questions may sound kinda ignorant. The answers may be a little obvious. I love this site and have read so many comments and learned so much! Anyway, I have a Canon 60D camera with live-view. I have a Tasco reflector with D=114mm F=900mm(this maybe a little small?). I will be using a T-ring/adapter and with this I hope to capture many decent photos. But for the eclipse, do need a special filter for the scope or the camera or both? If so, could you give suggestions where to get this? Thanks to everyone for any help!
  3. Although I'm more interested in visual astronomy, I still think it's fun to try some basic astrophotography every now and then. However, I don't think I have the time or patience to get into "proper" prime focus DSO stuff (ordered Making Every Photon Count out of curiosity anyway, you never know, right!?). At least for the time being. But I do want to get started with some widefield work this year, both still images and time lapse videos. I'm currently investigating the various options when it comes to tracking platforms such as iOptron SkyTracker/Skyguider, AstroTrac, Vixen Polarie and so on. Still not sure which way to go with that just yet. Anyway, I've started to put together some other various bits and pieces to get going. Just recently got an adapter to mount an RDF on the camera using the hotshoe to better be able to aim it where I need and want: http://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p5641_Lacerta-adapter-for-mounting-red-dot-finders-to-camera-flash-shoes.html Also have an intervalometer that I bought last year, but havn't used much so far: http://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p1464_Programmable-SLR-Remote-Control-for-Sony--Minolta.html I will, when the weather improves, try some basic shots with the camera on a fixed tripod (Manfrotto 190 PROB) just for fun. I've see some very interesting results here on SGL lately.
  4. The Nikon D5300 has a well-earned reputation as one of the lowest noise DSLR cameras used for Astrophotography. Now that I have a new Nikon D7500, I was keen to see how it compared to the D5300 in terms of the level of read noise and the extent to which that read noise is non-random ( and thus needs to be removed using a Master Bias frame to prevent it summing up during image integration). So here goes ... ......... A single bias frame Nikon D5300: ISO400, 1/4000th second: This may look pretty bad but really the extreme stretch is bringing out the very small variations across the frame: Standard Deviation: 3.53 ADU ( note: in this context, 3.53 ADU means 3.53 "units" on a real number scale ranging from 0 to 16,383 ( ie. a real conversion of a 14 bit digital scale )) The master bias frame looks like this: Nikon D5300: ISO400, 1000 x 1/4000th sec frames Standard deviation: 0.48 ADU The bands at the bottom are each 1 ADU brighter than the one above. Now for the D7500 ... A single bias frame from the Nikon D7500: ISO400, 1/4000th second: It is immediately clear that the single bias frame is cleaner. The statistics confirm this: Standard Deviation: 1.37 ADU And the master bias ... Nikon D7500: ISO400, 1000 x 1/4000th sec frame Standard deviation: 0.07 ADU The band at the bottom is 1 ADU brighter than the background. The improvement is very obvious Std. Deviation single bias frame: 1.37 versus 3.53 Std. Deviation master bias ( 1000 frames ): 0.07 versus 0.48 In graphical form ... Conclusion: The read noise in a single frame from the D7500 is around 40% of that in one from the D5300. This should give me greater flexibility to reduce exposure times and still ensure that the read noise is only an insignificant component of the overall noise. I will need to consider further the impact of the very low level of pattern noise in the Master Bias; it is so low that I will think about whether or not I still need to calibrate my lights with a Master Bias ( particularly for long exposures when the noise is dominated by light pollution and thermal noise ).
  5. Ok. Hello. Just starting astronomy again. Would like to view/photograph moon/planets and maybe sun? What would be best scope for this? My 200p dobsonian or a skywatcher 120 refractor? I also have a goto EQ5. Thanks
  6. Hi all, Absolute newby here - my first foray into astronomy. I bought a Saxon 1400mm 6" refractor secondhand complete with a EQ mount for a bargain price and I'm keen to get it working properly for both planetary and deep space observations. I invested in a few extras such as a laser collimator and a 3x barlow. I think I have a handle on how it all works including the EQ mount. I took the scope out for a test over Easter - which just happened to coincide with a ISS transit of the full moon. Rippa, I thought, that would be great to capture on my first night of observations. The problem I have is the complete inability to focus the scope to anything like sharp enough. I have some photos I took with the scope attached: The scene with the normal camera lens for my daylight practice session A shot of a distant house with the telescope (using a Nikon D7000 on a t-mount adaptor) The same house with the barlow attached A shot of the moon- no barlow - as sharp as I could get it - certainly no way to see the silhouette of the ISS with the scope this out of focus When I was collumating the scope, I noticed a that the reflection on the primary mirror was not a single spot but rather a line ... which means that the laser on the collimator target is a line rather than a dot I confirmed that this is not a problem with the shape of the laser beam coming from the collimator by showing the shape on my hand at a distance of 14m I'm not sure if the distortion of the laser is the fault of the secondary mirror or the lens(es) in the bottom of the eyepiece mount. I'm also not sure if this distortion is what is causing the inability to focus the scope, but I suspect that both issues are symptoms of the same problem. I'd appreciate any ideas on what to do next to resolve the focus issue.
  7. I have owned an 8" Celestron for 25 years and a couple of years ago upgraded my mount to an Exos-2 GOTO mount, love it, but until recently have taken only film pictures. I enjoy taken time exposures of nebula and star clusters etc. attaching my camera to the scope via a telextender thus allowing for wide angle shots. 2 years ago I dipped my toe into digital water and bought a £50 Orion planetary camera to get the feel of going digital. All well and good, I got some nice close ups of the moon and some fairly decent shots of Jupiter. However it is very limiting and I want to have the range I previously had with my old film camera. This is where I need some help, I want to restrict my budget to £200 but will go to £300 if necessary. I realise that spending over a £1000 is not unusual, but way too much for my limited means. Don't mind buying second hand if that will provide the camera necessary, but prefer a lower cost new one. So which camera do I buy and can I assume I can get a 'T" ring, if that is what they are still called, to attach it to my scope? I already have Registax and Photoshop for processing. I have only just started looking but it seems that digital cameras with detachable lenses can be very costly. Any advice would be really appreciated as I can't afford to make a costly mistake and buy an unsuitable camera. Just one last thing. I have read comments from other members describing how they got their pics and have not a clue what they are talking about, it's a foreign language to me. Dark screen, subtract this and that, I have no idea. I am getting too old to learn all this new complicated stuff. Can I not just buy an ordinary digital camera, screw it to my scope and set the time exposure? Or is that too simple and just a pipe dream? It's just that I look at their fabulous pics and go green with envy and wish I could take pics like that! But surely I can with the right camera? At the moment I get the impression I need a university degree to get a good pic of say the Orion nebula. With film it was so easy, just had to get the scope correctly polar aligned and select the right exposure time! But my very best film pic of Orion I used to be so proud of is as nothing compared to modern digital pics of same, the fine detail now shown is simply stunning! thanks. Keith
  8. ( click tap on image to see larger and sharper ) This image shows multiple bright nebula and star clusters in an area adjacent to the the Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). The largest of these are the bright pink nebula in the upper right part of the image ( NGC 2014 ) and the blue nebula in the lower right ( NGC 2030 ). Details: Bright Nebulae: NGC 2014 ( upper right, pink) size 30 x 20 arcmin Mag +8. NGC 2020 size 2.0 arcmin NGC 2030 ( lower right, blue ). NGC 2032 . NGC 2035 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin NGC 2040 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin Open clusters: NGC 2002 size 2 arcmin Mag +10.1 NGC 2004 size 2.7 arcmin Mag +9.6 NGC 2006 size 1 arcmin Mag +11.5 NGC 2011 size 1 arcmin Mag +10.6 NGC 2021 size 0.9 arcmin Mag +12.1 NGC 2027 size 0.7 arcmin Mag +11.9 NGC 2034 NGC 2041 size 0.7 arcmin Mag +10.4 Image centre RA 05h 33m 25.583s, Dec -67° 18' 02.586" (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arcmin): 58.8 x 39.2 Scale (full size image) 0.585 arcsec/pixel Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ) Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410 mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Filter: none HDR combination of four sets of exposures: 9 x 300 sec ISO 200 4 x 120 sec ISO 200 4 x 120 sec ISO 100 4 x 60 sec ISO 100 Pixinsight & Photoshop 29 January 2017 link: 500px.com/MikeODay
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