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Found 61 results

  1. From the album: Nebula

    First image from my new NEQ6 Pro driven mount, all other images before this were static. Sky Watcher 200P prime focus, 10x 60's lights, darks, bias and flats. ISO 200 Bortle 6 Yes I know there is a plane track through it.
  2. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Orion Nebula imaged in RGB through a Celestron 8" SCT at F10 (2032mm FL) using a full spectrum modded and cooled Canon 40D. Tracked using a Celestron CGEM mount. Total exposure time was 1 hour and 24 minutes.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  3. Hello All, I was wondering whether it's possible to image a DSO and capture any depth. Every 3D astro image online is faked so at the start of the year, I decided to image M42 six months apart. Back in March I posted a image of M42 imaged at f10, 2032mm FL through my 8SE on 28th February 2019. Than on 3rd September (setup and captured 15 second subs on 1 September) I captured M42 at the same focal length, same orientation and very similar subs for a total exposure of 1 hr 24 minutes. This was almost to the day exactly 6 months between the two images, so the earth was 300 million km away from the original position on the other side of the sun, furthest I could hope for imaging a 3D stereo pair. First attached is the image from September... I color matched the above image with the image from February, aligned them and below is the end result.... As you can see there is no detectable 3D effect... There was a 3Dish effect but this was most likely due to the differences in processing of the two stacks and when I SCALE and rotate the two images to align them, and hence no 3D effect. Of course the stars and nebula are certainly not on a flat plain so I believe that the reason for the lack of any discernable depth is simply due to the distance of M42 resulting in a very small angular shift in the stars, so small in fact, that it’s beyond the sensitivity of my 8” SCT, camera pixel resolution and tracking accuracy of the CGEM. Calculation of the expected motion of any parallax shift when the Orion Nebula is 1344 lightyears away and the distance of Earth being 149,600,000km from the Sun: 1344LY = 1.2715e+16km Θ° = Tan-1(149.6e+6/1.2715e+16) Parallax Shift Θ” = 2 x 3600 x Θ Parallax Shift Θ” = 0.0048536712567150 An angular motion of 0.005” was not picked up by my system that tracks with an average accuracy of about 1” RMS, with a camera sensor that has a resolution of 1.16”/pixel at 2032mm focal length with a 8” SCT. Even if I could get consistent tracking at the best accuracy that I have ever seen with my gear, 0.38” RMS, this is still well above 0.005” and well beyond the 40D sensor pixel resolution, and all this is without considering atmospheric distortion, obviously my setup is not even close to sensitive enough. This was a good project but unfortunately the distances of objects in the universe are too great, even objects classed as in our celestial “backyard”. If I didn’t try this experiment than I would be always wondering and curiosity would most likely make me try it eventually. Clear Skies, MG
  4. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This exposure of the Orion Nebula region is really just a quick and lazy session since I didn't want to waste a clear night by doing nothing and the scope was already setup and focused so I wouldn't be spending much time on setup. I also didn't have a plan for imaging another object it seemed like a good idea being a bright and easy object to image. I already imaged this object in the past, but by comparing the setup, procedure and improved tracking accuracy of the past together with the now cooled 40D, I know that the result would have been an improvement if I would have dedicated the necessary exposure time, through the necessary NB filters. This image all consists of RGB/OSC, IRCut filtered, 31x15s, 32x30s, 16x60s, 10x90s, 11x120s ISO1600 subs.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  5. Hello astronomers, This exposure of the Orion Nebula region is really just a quick and lazy session since I didn't want to waste a clear night by doing nothing and the scope was already setup and focused so I wouldn't be spending much time on setup. I also didn't have a plan for imaging another object it seemed like a good idea being a bright and easy object to image. I already imaged this object in the past, but by comparing the setup, procedure and improved tracking accuracy of the past together with the now cooled 40D, I know that the result would have been an improvement if I would have dedicated the necessary exposure time, through the necessary NB filters. This image consists of all RGB or OSC (through the IRCut filter) 31x15s, 32x30s, 16x60s, 10x90s, 11x120s ISO1600 subs. I am not prepared to spend subsequent nights capturing narrowband subs on "Orion's Sword", at least not this year... perhaps next time M42 is in the sky and only if I reach near freezing temperature cooling on my sensor. Clear skies, MG
  6. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    Image of the great Orion Nebula, M42 or NGC 1976, taken in natural color through my 8" SCT at a focal length of 2032mm using an astro modded and (the recently) cooled Canon 40D DSLR. Total exposure time was just 1 hour 21 minutes and 45 seconds, image consists of 15 x 15sec, 12 x 30, 60, 120 and 180 second subs at ISO1600.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  7. Hello Astronomers, Image of the great Orion Nebula, M42 or NGC 1976, taken in natural color through my 8" SCT at a focal length of 2032mm using an astro modded and (the recently) cooled Canon 40D DSLR. Total exposure time was just 1 hour 21 minutes and 45 seconds, image consists of 15 x 15sec, 12 x 30, 60, 120 and 180 second subs at ISO1600. Clear Skies, MG
  8. WOW! Had a great view! Used my Pocket Sky Atlas to plan the night, then I just shot right out there! Saw the 7 Sisters (Pleiades), then hopped to the Orion Nebula! Used my ES 18 mm to find it then switched to the Morpheus 12.5 mm and could actually see wispy parts of the Nebula! ( I guess that’s what it was! LoL!) Really amazing! Called the wife out to take a look. Next I want to find Andromeda! Greg
  9. Hi, i captured orion nebula with nikon d5600 and nikon 18-140mm lens,the images it took was shaky and look like small star trails but i kept only at minimum shutter speed...what is wrong with the image? i hv attached sample image..pls help
  10. The Orion Nebula core 21/12/2017 21:32 (1300 light years) GSO 0.20 m Sky-Watcher NEQ-5 Pro SynScan mount QHY5L-IIC + IR cut filter f: 1000 mm f/5 300x1" + 248 dark Total exp: 5 min Matteo Vacca Milis, Italy http://vaccamatteo.weebly.com/ https://www.astrobin.com/users/matteovacca/
  11. Not that anyone could get fed up with this object... Date: 01 January 2018 Equipment: SXV-H9, Vixen 114mm f5.3 ED refractor, guiding with Lodestar X2/PHD Subframes: 30 x 300s, 100s & 20s H-alpha, 20 x 20s & 100s RGB 2x2 binned, 20 flats for each channel, no darks (hot pixel removal in Astroart instead). Images were acquired and pre-processed (aligned, stacked, denoised) in AstroArt4, then composited in Paint Shop Pro7. The Orion Nebula presents quite a challenge to depict because of the wide brightness range of its key features. Many early CCD images of this object as shown on the web "burn out" the "trapezium" region of the four central stars in attempting to show the outlying nebulosity. I use the "layers" function in PaintShop Pro, stacking the longest exposures on top of shorter ones, and then carefully use the "eraser" tool to remove overexposed areas, leaving the underlying correctly exposed regions to show through. This has to be done with care to avoid introducing obvious processing artefacts. Whilst the latest image processing programs such as Pixinsight have "dynamic range adjustment" features that can automatically produce an even distribution of brightness, some of the resultant images can seem rather strange to my eyes. Programmes like that are way beyond both my budget and my understanding! LRGB combination (using the H-alpha stack as the luminance channel) went well in both Astroart and PaintShop Pro. The PSP version was a lot greener than the Astroart one (though you can “weight” colours to compensate for CCD sensitivity at different wavelengths), but I preferred the PSP output as it hinted at the greenish hue of the nebula that is so clearly discernible though the eyepiece. All of the brighter features seen in the above image show clearly through my VC200L and a 25mm eyepiece. The central trapezium of four stars shines brilliantly against a bright silvery background, which fades into the convoluted greenish wings of the surrounding nebula. The dark channel between the main portion of the nebula and the upper candle-flame is clearly seen. I strove to retain all of these key features in the image above, as well as highlight the extended nebulosity that the eye cannot see. Any comments, criticisms or suggestions gratefully received...
  12. One night after complaining on the forums that observing opportunities are so few and far between in the UK during winter and I look up to see clear skies and a blindingly bright moon. My preferred targets are DSOs but having recently bought a Baader Neutral Density Moon filter (0.9) I thought it might be a great time to try it out. I'd also recently bought that thingy that lets you attach your phone to the eyepiece and so I took the picture below and I'm fairly pleased with the result. I thought that the blue fringe of doom was exclusively a refractor thing which is why I was surprised to see the blue fringe in the picture. I have owned my Skyliner 200p Dobsonian for around ten years and so it might surprise you to know that I have never managed to see the Orion Nebula through my telescope, or any other telescope for that matter; so last night, with the moon 96% of full I thought I'd give it a try. Less than ideal conditions you might say but I have to tell you, it was still spectacular! I was able to see a surprising amount of detail and I also worked out (at long last) which time of year and what time of night I can see the whole of Orion from my back garden (mid to late January onwards at around 11pm) rather than the utterly light polluted front garden. I cannot wait for a moonless (clear) night so I can sketch the nebula! I did also discover that my collimation efforts were less than stellar (pun intended) and so, back to the drawing board. Overall it was a fantastic night's observing! I was able to spend a good while not just looking at the nebula but observing it and teasing out as much detail as I could using the usual old tricks. The night was clear but all my back garden observing is done over the neighbours' houses, so heat shimmer and therefore focus was an issue. I actually used my Baader Neodymium filter to reduce the effects of light pollution and increase contrast which it did very well. I'm seriously itching for a clear moonless night! By the way if anyone can recommend a good observing chair my back would be very grateful
  13. King of the winter night sky -Orion NebulaAs the part of our galaxy lies around 1340 light years from us and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth.Only 27 frames as the clouds were covering all sky as soon as I arrived.. Scope: Skywatcher EVOSTAR 80ED DS-ProMount: AZ EQ6-GT Camera: QHY168C Filter Optolong L-PRO MAX Luminosity Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: SW 9x50 finderscope 27x300s exposure at -10°C (135min total) 2h 15min binning 1x1 20xdarks 30xbias 20x flats
  14. Taken Saturday night, 25/26 Nov 17. 80 subs of 0.1.s, 1s, 10s x 20 each. 60s and 180s x 10 each. Flats/bias/darks x 10 each. Atik 4120EX OSC camera Celestron C11 with Hyperstar Mesu 200 mount.
  15. So as this season's first image, I have started on the Orion nebula. I had guiding issues, but with my newly polar aligned observatory I could do 150sec exposures without issues. 1h 37min total. 6x 10 sec 18x 30sec 17x 60sec 28x 150sec I think it's a good start to continue on. I have darks and biases for it, but they where taken after I processed. I'll save them for when I get more data. Let me know what you think. It's been a long summer, so had to learn 'everything' again. At lest I have polaralignment within 5 arcsec in both axies this year
  16. Had a night out in a feild with a mate last night, we were aiming for a bit of polar alignment / guiding practice. It all went pear shaped very quickly ... He forgot the top half of his mount so we both played with my AVX. Pole master polar alignment went well, as did PHD2 with an Altair gpcam finder guider on a Zenithstar 71. Put the Nikon D5300 on and focused roughly with a Bahtinov, then started BYN (back yard Nikon) Would it connect ? No chance ! Tried various reboots etc. No joy. So We tried Steve's camera... Canon ! But we could swap T adaptor , yay ! But no, his was a T to M48 to screw straight on his Star 71. So I bunged my Nikon back on and pressed the shutter manually for about 20 30 second exposures @ 400 iso. All good fun though and we had a great laugh. Edit : tried connecting Nikon this morning and it worked straight away ... I laughed , kind of hysterically ?
  17. M42 took quite a bit of processing time. That is a bright core even with very short exposures. Then how much of the fainter stuff do you try to pull out? There might be more to be found in the data, but I am trying to keep things looking 'natural'. Then again, what is 'natural'? I'd be interested to hear what people think. Data capture was completed in February 2017. It consists: Luminance: 15x15" bin 1x1 Luminance: 16x60" bin 1x1 Luminance: 16x600" bin 1x1 Red: 8x15" bin 1x1 Red: 8x60" bin 1x1 Red: 16x600" bin 1x1 Green: 8x15" bin 1x1 Green: 8x60" bin 1x1 Green: 16x600" bin 1x1 Blue: 8x15" bin 1x1 Blue 8x60" bin 1x1 Blue: 32x600" bin 1x1 TOTAL = 14.2 hours Astrodon filters from the Tak 106/QSI 683 rig at DSW.
  18. Observing Information DSO - M42/M43 Date - 15/03/17 Time - 20:15 Lunar Phase - 89% Seeing - Good Equipment - Celestron Nexstar 6SE Eyepieces - ES 24mm 68 degree Additional info - Wow is all I can say with this one before last night my favourite Nebula was the eagle Nebula now I'm not so sure. First thing that struck me when I started observing was the beautiful pattern of stars the 4 close together in the middle with the bottom right one being the brightest and the 3 star at the bottom. The longer I observed the more detail jumped out at me the swirl of gas almost like an arc was simply breath taking not since I first observed M13 my first ever DSO have I been so overwhelmed. M43 was a bit strange though I could make out the star but no gas cloud or shape to it it's at mag 7 so shouldn't have been to much of a problem maybe next time I will use one of my Nebula filters but my O lll stayed in its case as I didn't feel the need. I also spent some time observing Jupiter, I could make out 4 of the moons 2 of which were very close in proximity these turned out to be Euopa and Lo. The other 2 being Ganymede and Callisto in that order. I could also make out the 2 main bands of Jupiter the north and south equatorial belts but no luck with the Great Red Spot still beautiful to observe though here's an image of stellarium. The moon unfortunately was up a bit late but got about 15 mins observation time beautiful crisp craters and lovely shadows again along the terminator. So a very good session and one of my favourite sketches to date ? Clear skies ?? Richard
  19. From the album: The-MathMog's Images

    One of my only semi-successful sessions with imaging. This whole thing is still very new to me, and the learning curve seems very steep, which makes it interesting and rewarding though. Celestron Nexstar 130 SLT Baader Barlow (Only the lens was used, which was screwed onto the prime focus adapter. Nikon d5200 2x 30 second subs (not sure how I pulled those off) 6400 iso 1x 8 second sub
  20. 0hmmm. can't seem to get tight focus on stars; finally got hold of a bhatinov mask and took shot (see below). unless i'm missing something, this looks ok yet when i take mask off stars look like small indescript blobs. star used was rigel - panned over to orion nebula and well kind of meh sadly. i tethered camera to laptop, zoomed right in 10x and still no better. used canon eos utility. should i upgrade to eos backyard or what else can i try? checked my collimation too and looks grand under high magnification. help!!
  21. Finally managed to have a proper go at Orion Widefield last weekend. 45x240s (3hours) with Canon 6D and 50mm f2.8 at ISO800. No darks/bias/flats. Stacked in DSS and processed in PS. I am pretty happy with the result but now it got me thinking, how do I go from this to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_Molecular_Cloud_Complex#/media/File:Orion_Head_to_Toe.jpg Is it a matter of longer acquisition, or is that CCD territory?
  22. Nadine2704

    Orion Nebula

    From the album: Astrophotography

    Taken with my iOptron Skytracker and Canon 70d with 300mm lens.
  23. Halloween Observation Night Date: 31 October/ 01 November 2016 @ 22:30-01:00AEDT Location: Robertson Equipment: Celestron 8SE on CGEM, Televue 31mm Nagler Type-5, 17mm Ethos, 2X 2" Powermate, Astronomik UHC Filter I finally had a clear moonless night of observation, it just happened to be on Halloween night. I was looking for a new spot in the mountains where I could setup and a couple of months ago I came across a nice little oval miles away from the city and light sources so I was hanging to check it out. When we arrived, there were people having a BBQ and playing tennis with all of the court lights on, this was a bit of a bummer but I figured that they won't be forever and eventually we'll have a clear night of viewing, they left just after 22:30. Once they left and lights were off we had some nice views of 47Tuc, Tarantula Nebula area, Orion Nebula, The Sculptor Galaxy, NGC362 Globular Cluster, The Helix Nebula, an Open cluster in the south near/around Theta Carnia, Uranus and Neptune. 47Tuc: The globular cluster clearly stood out with its millions of glistening stars becoming denser toward the core. As I was observing the cluster in the 17mm Ethos, a slow moving and bright satellite flew past it. Those views are an event that makes a already great view even better. The view of 47Tuc were all awesome using both 31mm Nagler and 17mm Ethos with and without the 2X powermate. NGC362: This globular was a lot smaller and fainter than 47Tuc but still had a lot of individual stars all around it and individual stars visible within the core. Not as impressive as 47Tuc but still a nice view through the 17mm Ethos that's very easy to see with direct vision. NGC 2070: The Tarantula Nebula was a very nice view in all powers. The loops around a obviously brighter tentacular center were faintly visible, especially when observing it using the averted method. I started the viewing using the 17mm ethos through which I saw a fair bit of detail on a quite big tarantula nebula in the eyepiece. The surprising view was when I had a look at it through the 31mm T5 Nagler. The FOV was large enough and magnification low enough for being able to position the Tarantula in left lower with nebulosity amongst hundreds of stars to the right visible where a bit of the large Magellanic cloud was coming into the FOV. There was some fuzziness and nebulosity above it, I thought what a great view, this would make a great photo. The view of the tarantula system through the Nagler was amazing, I saw nebulosity, hundreds of stars and it was all easy to see. M42/43/Running Man: Orion Nebula was a bit of a disappointment. Granted that I was waiting for the Orion nebula to come above the trees and it was not very high in the sky at the time, but I am comparing it to the view I had in the past. The shape was visible, with the trapezium clearly visible with the stars being very stable and sharp points of light, so I figured that the seeing was good, so why do I not see more detail in Orion Nebula? I saw way more nebula and detail in the past. I added the UHC filter in the eyepiece and sure it faded the stars but it did not bring out more detail like it did before, actually it made the view worse! Using both the Nagler and Ethos, in both magnifications the nebulosity was not as defined and clear as in the past but definitely there. M43 was not as defined as I saw from the dam at the start of the year, back then the "comma" shape was clearly visible and even detail visible with in it, not tonight, I was struggling to see the comma shape. The Running Man was nearly visible, I actually think that at times I saw the running man shape, about as good as I remember seeing it at the beginning of the year, so seeing was (most likely) good so why am I not seeing the nebula like before? I started to investigate. First I checked to make sure that the corrector plate was not fogged over, it was not, that I removed the real cell filter in the back of the scope on the visual back thread, thinking that maybe it takes away from the view. When comparing with and without it, I saw no difference, even suspected the dew shield perhaps causing some kind of a slight blockage and compared with and with out it, no difference, finally I re-collimated the mirrors, they were slightly out, but after collimation it again made no difference. I put it down to a combination of Orion nebula being too low in the sky just above the trees and in the direction of the city. Here I'll mention that the sky did seem quite bright, I thought that maybe my eyes were dark adapted and it seemed like it but maybe not, more on this later with my experience when I was packing up for the night. I guess I have no choice than to try again and see if a darker/more transparent sky will make a difference next observing session. NGC253: The Sculptor Galaxy was relatively easy to see, whether inverted or direct vision I could see a brighter center in a squashed oval, cigar, shape. Occasionally I think I saw some darker "cracks" through the brighter core along with 3 to 5 faint stars glistening within the elongated shape. Sculptor is big in the FOV so I kept it on the 31mm Nagler, the Ethos did not make the view any better or easier to see. I could see the galaxy clearer the more I looked at it and feel like I didn't spend enough time looking at it. NCG7293: The Helix Nebula was a faint but a big ghostly smoke ring in the 31mm Nagler. It is very faint but the smokey ring can be made out using averted vision, or slowly moving the view with the keypad set to "3". I could make out the central neutron star, very small and faint but definitely there. Next time I observe this object I'll have to try looking at it through various filters instead of just bare, maybe more will be visible. Southern open star cluster: visible with eye as fuzzy patch closer to a dust cloud rather than stars but in binoculars and in the scope was visible as heaps of scattered stars, Looking at a star map it seems to be the cluster around Theta Carina. Looked like hundreds of pin point stars were spilled into the FOV. Quite a nice view, no nebulosity visible within its vicinity. Uranus: It is a pale greenish tiny disc that's discernible from the stars around it due to its color and a little disc as opposed to a point of light, I saw no moons. Neptune: Neptune was a pale tiny grey-blueish disc barely bigger then the two stars next to it. As with Uranus, I didn't spend much time on it since there's no hope of seeing any more detail. As a last object due to its late rising this time of the year, I wanted to see the rosette but it wasn't above the trees by 01:00 when we left. Still I found it in the eyepiece and identified the 7 stars located in the center making a rhomboid shape. I read online that this nebula is one where a UHC filter really makes it stand out, so I had to try it. The center stars were still behind tree tops and sad to say that with and without the UHC filter I did not spot any nebulosity. This object will have to wait a couple of months for a darker night and when it's higher in the sky. The 31mm Nagler, 17mm ethos, 2" 2X Powermate and the Astronomik 2" UHC filter is all we took... Honestly you don't need any more than this to observe using a 8" SCT. This combination covered various magnifications and limited fumbling around in the dark for eyepieces or filters allowing more time at the eyepiece. We had some great views tonight and I can't wait to be in a dark site when the seeing is even darker with less or no sky glow. Surprisingly the Astronomik UHC made the views worse on all occasions. Not like the Lumicon that gave me the wow views on the past, unfortunately the Carina Nebula was below the horizon so I couldn't test on it, the Carina is really breathtaking through the Lumicon UHC. Next time I'm going to compare the Astronomik 2" to the Lumicon 1.25" which I didn't have with me, I'm hoping that it was just the seeing otherwise I'll eBay it and get the 2" Lumicon. Another combination I want to try the 2" TVs with is through the f6.8 reducer. It seemed like there was heaps of skyglow. We made sure that we were in total darkness, no lights except purely red lights. Yes lots of objects and stars were visible, more than from home but when we were packing up when I turned on the car head lights and we were hit by white light destroying our night adaptation. After we were packed up, I turned off the head lights and I looked up and to my surprise the sight was similar to "dark adapted" eyes!!! Perhaps it was a night of bad seeing after all, which would explain the lack of nebulosity and detail within. The skyglow was obviously quite severe and it wasn't the best I've seen in a dark site, but still an awesome night of observing, leaving me with a hunger for more. Thanks for reading, clear skies, Mariusz
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