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Found 89 results

  1. The Wishing Well Cluster ( NGC 3532 ) in the constellation Carina ( click on image to see full size / best resolution ) This large bright open cluster, when seen through a small telescope, looks like a collection of brightly gleaming silver coins shimmering at the bottom of a wishing well and hence the name. First recorded in 1752 by Nicolas Lacaille, NGC 3532 contains around 120 stars superimposed on the expanse of the Milkyway and is visible with the naked eye from lower latitudes. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Co-ordinates: ~ RA 11h 6.4m, Dec -58 deg 50.5' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 Light Pollution Filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90 36 subs ranging from 30 sec 300 sec ISO 200 Pixinsight & Photoshop 10th April 2016
  2. My scope is out of action at the moment ( stupid me stripped the thread on the bottom of one of the tube rings whilst chasing the last tiny bit of cone error - as usual, "perfection is the enemy of the good" ).. Anyway, this is one I captured late last year but I could not get the colour balance right. With nothing better to do I played around with it today unitl I was reasonalby content with it. ( click on image to go to larger image ) Details: NGC 104 ( also known as 47 Tucanae ) alongside the far more distant NGC 121 in the constellation Tucana by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ). NGC 104 - 47 Tucanae, is the second largest Globular Cluster in the sky ( after Omega Centauri ). Only visible from lower latitudes, it was not recorded by European observers until Nicholas de Lacaille did so whilst visiting South Africa in 1751. Containing millions stars and appearing about the size of the full moon, 47 Tucanae is in fact approximately 214 light years in diameter and around 15,000 light years from Earth. The smaller cluster, NGC 121, appears as a companion to 47 Tucanae but is in fact of similar size, more than ten times farther away at around 200,000 light years and belongs to one of the Milkyway's dwarf galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud . Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: NGC 104 - RA 00h 24.1m, Dec -72 deg 5' NGC 121 - RA 00h 268.1m, Dec -71 deg 31' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90 Combination of 66 images ranging from 25 to 200 sec @ ISO400 16 Oct 2015 Pixinsight
  3. Nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4945 in the constellation Centaurus by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ) ( Still a work in progress really; 10 subs is not really enough for this 9th mag galaxy from my medium polluted skies. These were taken in the last minutes of the wee hours before dawn after I had finished taking subs of comet 252P/LINEAR and I have not had a chance to take any more as it has been cloudy ever since. ) NGC 4945 in the constellation Centaurus is a large spiral galaxy about the size of the Milkyway and around 13 million light years from Earth. It is shown here nearly edge-on and is accompanied in the image by a number of far more distant galaxies; the brightest of which is the 10th magnitude elliptical galaxy NGC 4976 (centre left of the image) which is around 30 million light years away. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: centre of image: RA 13h 06m, Dec -49 deg 32' (nova.astrometry.net) Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 light pollution filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Long exposure noise reduction on Field of view (min) ~ 79.6 x 53 Downsampled image scale ~ 4.4" per pixel Stack of 10 x 200sec images @ ISO400 Pixinsight
  4. The Southern Beehive Cluster ( NGC 2516 ) in the constellation Carina - by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ). Because of its similarity to the “The Beehive Cluster” ( catalogued as M44 by Messier ), NGC 2516, which is only visible from lower latitudes, has become known as the “Southern Beehive Cluster”. At a distance of around 1300 light years, NGC 2516 is relatively close to us and resides in the same spiral arm of the Milkyway as we do. Containing around 100 stars, with a number of them in the magnitude 5 to 6 range, NGC 2516 has an apparent magnitude of 3.8 and is visible to the naked eye as a small bright hazy patch at the edge of the Milkyway. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: centre of image: RA 7h 58.4m, Dec -60 deg 41.9' (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arc min): 78.9 x 52.6 Scale of image: 2.18 arcsec / pixel Up direction in image is North Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2 guiding RA only Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector Hutech IDAS D1 light pollution filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Long exposure noise reduction on Stack of 14 x 360sec images @ ISO400 Pixinsight. Taken from the Blue Mountains above Sydney Australia over two nights: 29th and 30th March 2016
  5. Galaxy Centaurus A ( NGC 5128 ) in the southern constellation Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see full size ) ............ Updated again - to try to bring out more faint detail ... ............ Updated images ... ............. Originals ... ( 100% crop ) Centaurus A is relatively near to us in the local group of galaxies and is around 11 Million light years away. The unusual shape of Centaurus A is believed to be due to an ancient collision between a large elliptical galaxy and a much smaller spiral galaxy. With an apparent magnitude of +6.8, Centaurus A is the fifth brightest galaxy in the night sky and in the middle of the 20th century it was identified as being the strongest radio source in the Centaurus constellation. Details: Galaxy - Centaurus A ( NGC 5128 ) Image ( Nova.astrometry.net ): Center (RA, hms): 13h 25m 28.924s Center (Dec, dms): -43° 01' 25.486" Size: 60.5 x 41.1 arcmin Orientation: Up is -89.9 degrees E of N Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Format: 14bit NEF Long exposure noise reduction: off Filter: none Calibration: No darks, just master bias and master flat HDR combination of eight sets of exposures (27, 28 & 29 April 2017): 85 x 240 sec ISO 800 16 x 120 sec ISO 800 16 x 60 sec ISO 800 16 x 30 sec ISO 800 16 x 15 sec ISO 800 16 x 8 sec ISO 800 16 x 4 sec ISO 800 16 x 2 sec ISO 800 Pixinsight May 2017 Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay www.flickr.com/photos/mike-oday
  6. Galaxy 2MASX J05314916-6721339 in Dorado in the region of the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) and not far ( in angular terms ) from NGC 2004 and NGC 2011. From Simbad: 2MASX J05314916-6721339 "Galaxy in a group of galaxies" - Type: Sa D ( Spiral ) ( J2000: 5h 31m 49.16s -67d 21' 33.92" ) ( http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-id?Ident=%403123415&Name=2MASX J05314916-6721339&submit=submit ) ( other id: IRAS Faint Source Catalog - IRAS F05319-6723 ) It can be found in the vicinity of NGC 2004 and NGC 2011 -------------- Crops taken from full frame image: Dragons Head Nebula and NGC 2014 in the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) ( not far from the Tarantula Nebula - NGC 2070 ) - NGC 2004 - NGC 2011 - NGC 2014 - NGC 2020 - NGC 2021 - NGC 2030 - NGC 2032 - NGC 2035 - NGC 2040
  7. Omega Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 17, NGC 6618 ). Visible to the naked eye the Omega Nebula, also known as the Swan, Horseshoe or Lobster Nebula, M17 is in the Milkyway and is aound 4200 light years distance from Earth Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: RA 18h 22m, Dec -16deg 10'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 37 x 100 sec ISO800. Pixinsight & Photoshop 14 August 2015 - processed 3 Oct 2015
  8. Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) Re-processed to tweak colour balance and bring out a little more faint detail: New version: Original: ( click/tap on image to see full size - the above compressed version looks a little soft; the full size version is sharper ) The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) is the largest and brightest emission nebula in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). At a distance of 160,000 light years away from us, the Tarantula Nebula is so bright that it would cast shadows on the Earth if were as close to us as the Orion Nebula in our galaxy. First image with new telescope and autoguider/setup. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Nebulae: NGC 2070 Tarantula Nebula NGC 2048 NGC 2060 NGC 2077. Open clusters: NGC 2042 NGC 2044 NGC 2050 NGC 2055 NGC 2091 NGC 2093 NGC 2100 Image centre RA 5h 38m 57.3s, Dec -69deg 20' 36.6" (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arcmin): 58.7 x 39.2 Scale (full size image) 0.585 arcsec/pixel. Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, FL1200mm, f4 ) Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x Effective Focal Length / Aperture ): 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Filter: none Exposures: 14 x 240 sec ISO400 12 x 120 sec ISO400 10 x 60 sec ISO400 11 x 60 sec ISO200 10 x 60 sec ISO100 10 x 30 sec ISO100 Pixinsight & Photoshop 20 December 2016
  9. The Southern Beehive Cluster ( NGC 2516 ) in the constellation Carina re-processed ( improved colour balance, more colour in the smaller stars and lower saturation overall ): previous version: ( click on image to see larger ) Because of its similarity M44, NGC 2516, which is only visible from lower latitudes, has become known as the Southern Beehive Cluster. At a distance of around 1300 light years, NGC 2516 is relatively close to us and resides in the same spiral arm of the Milkyway as we do. Containing around 100 stars, with a number of them in the magnitude 5 to 6 range, NGC 2516 has an apparent magnitude of 3.8 and is visible to the naked eye as a small bright hazy patch at the edge of the Milkyway. Details: RA 7h 58.4m, Dec -60 deg 41.9' Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Guiding: Orion Shortube 80 guidescope, Starshoot Autoguider, PHD2, guiding RA only Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector. Hutech IDAS D1 light pollution filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Long exposure noise reduction on Stack of 14 x 360sec images @ ISO400 Pixinsight
  10. Ptolemy's Cluster in the constellation Scorpius ( Messier 7, NGC 6475 ) Scrapbook page ...
  11. Astrophotography Scrapbook Vol. 1 Cover Page Lagoon Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 8, NGC 6523 ) The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) War and Peace in Scorpius ( NGC 6357 ) Spiral Galaxy NGC 6744 in Pavo Ptolemy's Cluster in Scorpius ( Messier 7, NGC 6475 ) A Million Stars in the Deep South ( NGC 104, 47 Tucanae ) A Wishing Well in Carina ( NGC 3532 ) A Beehive in the Southern Sky ( NGC 2516 ) The Sliver Coin in Sculptor ( NGC 253 ) The Great Nebula in Orion ( Messier 42, NGC 1976 ) A Cluster of Pearls in Centaurus ( NGC 3766 ) - new 5 Dec resources: Scrapbook Template ------------------------------------- When I show my astrophotography images to my friends and family they invariably want to know what they are looking at. This led me to wonder if there was a way I could display my images on a single page together with a few notes on the target object as well as few technical details of the capture for those who might be interested. What I came up with a "scrapbook" like page that combines all of these three elements in a single PDF sheet ( or jpeg image) that ultimately I might combine together to form a PDF book that I can share online or send to friends and family. In the meantime, I thought I might post in this thread each page of my work-in-progress towards volume 1 of my Astrophotography Scrapbook. Any and all comments, observations, suggestions and constructive criticisms will be warmly received. Cheers Mike ps. The pages have been sized to fit full screen on an IPAD
  12. Came across this one by accident while moving the telescope around in CdC. A rather nice cluster don't you think? RC8 f/8 14x120s 350D modded More details here. Mark
  13. From the album: Mike's Images

    NGC 6357 in Scorpius Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. UHC-S - 100 x 100 sec ISO800 (14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on). Pixinsight and photoshop

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2015 - all rights reserved

  14. From the album: Mike's Images

    Orion's Belt - centered on "Alnitak", a 1.7 magnitute tripple star at one end of the belt. Includes the Flame Nebula (NGC2024) and IC434 which contains the Horsehead Nebula. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. UHC-S - 19 x 2min ISO400 (12bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on). Raw conversion, initial colour balance and shadow and hightlight recover in DXO Optics Pro, aligned and stacked in Nebulosity, processed in Photoshop 5 October 14

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2015 - all rights reserved

  15. Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) by Mike O'Day. The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) is the largest and brightest emission nebula in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). At a distance of 160,000 light years away from us, the Tarantula Nebula is so bright that it would cast shadows on the Earth if were as close to us as the Orion Nebula in our galaxy. New version ( April 9 ): ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper image ) ............ Older versions: And here it is re-processed to try to reduce the red background ( due to light pollution I think ) without impacting the colour of the stars too much ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Details: Nebulae: NGC 2070 Tarantula Nebula NGC 2048 NGC 2060 NGC 2077 Open clusters: NGC 2042 NGC 2044 NGC 2050 NGC 2055 NGC 2091 NGC 2093 NGC 2100 Image centre ... (nova.astrometry.net) Field of view (arcmin): ... Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture ): 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Filter: none. Exposures: 100 sub exposures ranging from 1s 100ISO to 240Sec 400ISO HDR processing of 5 sets of images Pixinsight & Photoshop 20 December 2016 / April 2017
  16. NGC 2014 and Dragon's Head nebula in the Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ) not far from the Tarantula Nebula by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ). This image shows multiple bright nebula and star clusters in an area adjacent to the The Tarantula Nebula ( NGC 2070 ) in the nearby irregular galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud ( LMC ). The largest of these are the bright pink nebula in the mid-right part of the image ( NGC 2014 ) and the blue nebula in the lower middle ( NGC 2030 ). ..... Updated image - reprocessed to impove colour balance ( April 15th ) ( please click / tap on image to see it larger and sharper ) .... Original: ( click on image to see larger and clearer ( grrr... image compression in version above )) ---------- This is the first image captured as part of a new image capture and processing workflow I am trying out... Roger Clark ( http://www.clarkvision.com/articles/index.html ) has a number of articles addressing colour processing and the performance of modern DSLR sensors. The "take homes" for me have been: 1. With a modern sensor ( one with on-sensor dark current suppression technology ) one may not need to capture dark frames ( in order to remove the now non-significant pattern noise ). 2. "Correct" white balance processing should start by using "daylight" RBG channel multipliers ( to get the star colour 'right') and any histogram adjustment to improve white balance of darker parts of the image should involve aligning the left side of histogram curves ( ie. not the peaks ) So, the workflow to produce the image above involves calibraiton with Superbias & Master Flat but no dark frame subtraction (neither post nor in-camera). Roger Clark speaks of using a "bad pixel map" as the basis of reducing hot pixels. I have not figured out how to produce one yet. However, with a little bit of dithering during guiding ( and the very busy image ) the hot pixels that are in the image below are not too overwhelming. With regard to colour balance; I tried using the "daylight" factors reported by the camera but these resulted in an image and stars that were quite blue. This image was based on the factors reported by DXOMark for the Nikon D5300 ( R x 2.12, G x 1, B x 1.49 ( D50 standard )). This was better but I still felt the need for a final tweak in Photoshop ( colourBalance Highlights +15 Cyan/Red, -5 Magenta/Green ) to improve the colour in the stars and mid-tones. { DXOMark "white balance scales" for D5300 found at: https://www.dxomark.com/Cameras/Nikon/D5300---Measurements on the "color response" tab } --------- Details: Bright Nebulae: NGC 2014 ( upper right, pink) size 30 x 20 arcmin Mag +8 NGC 2020 size 2.0 arcmin ( small blue-green oval nebula ) NGC 2030 NGC 2032 ( Dragon's Head nebula - blue, central bottom of image ) NGC 2035 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin NGC 2040 size 3.0 x 3.0 arcmin Open clusters: NGC 2004 size 2.7 arcmin Mag +9.6 NGC 2011 size 1 arcmin Mag +10.6 NGC 2021 size 0.9 arcmin Mag +12.1 Annotated : Image centre RA 05h 33m 32.362s, Dec -67° 32' 18.145" (nova.astrometry.net) Orientation: up is west, right is South Field of view (arcmin): 58.8 x 39.2 Scale (full size image) 0.585 arcsec/pixel Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 120mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Format: 14bit NEF Noise reduction: off Filter: none HDR combination of seven sets of exposures (20 & 22 Feb 2017): 58 x 240 sec ISO 800 8 x 120 sec ISO 800 8 x 60 sec ISO 800 8 x 30 sec ISO 800 8 x 14 sec ISO 800 8 x 7 sec ISO 800 8 x 3 sec ISO 800 Pixinsight: 26 Feb 2017 Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay
  17. Updated: new processed version ( no new data ) - 9th July ( please click / tap on image to see larger / sharper ) Still needs work but I do quite like the way the dark clouds are showing up against the bright nebula and I think the star colour is fairly close to accurate ( albeit that the saturation is too high ). ......... Just a work-in-progress version ... This is a central crop ( around 1/3 width ) of the original image and I am still trying to find the best way to process it ( this one has way too many problems; not least of which is the overblown stars and weird highlight artefacts on a few of the stars...). I have processed 12 stop HDR images before successfully but this one is proving very challenging. Anyway, I am sharing it now because the best results I have had so far involve stretching an extracted intensity image and then applying this to the RGB image to effectively stretch the colour image without any colour shifts and I was suprised that it produced this highly saturated image. That is, the image below has not had any manual adjustment to the saturation or any tweaks to colour balance. Summary of workflow: - Calibration ( master bias/flats, no darks ) - de-bayer - alignment then per set of images ( 12 sets in total from 1/8sec to 240 sec all at ISO800 - around 10 each for short exposures and 26 of the 240s long subs) - integration - DBE to obtain the background ( throw away the corrected image - just keep the background ) - Pixelmath to find the minimum of the background image and use this to produce an average Light Pollution image - Subtract the LP from the integrated image - HDRCompostion of the 12 integrated LP corrected images to create masks - throw away HDR image ( not usable for some reason - terrible colour shifts ) - Pixelmath to combine images with masks to produce an HDR image ( 64bit) with around 32bits of dynamic range - Extract CIE-L as new layer - Multiple interations of Maskedstretch of CIE-L image to produce a fully stretched image -Pixelmath to scale RGB image using CIE-L inage level information - some level tweaks ( curves and histogram ) mmm, still not happy - I need to keep experimenting ... Anyway, as I said, I am very suprised that the workflow produced such a saturated image with ( I think ) quite good colour balance. Equally I was suprised to see such a range of star colours from deep orange through gold to white and blue - all without having to spend ages tweaking colour balance as I usually have to . ( note: camera is an unmodified DSLR ( Nikon D5300 ) so HA regions are not so red )
  18. Re-processed 12th August 2017 using the new PhotometricColorCalibration tool from Pixinsight. This function seeks to adjust the colour balance of the image by plate solving the image and comparing the colour of the stars in the image with the colour values for these stars as stored in various databases. ( please click / tap on image to see larger / sharper ) ................. Trifid Nebula ( M20, NGC 6514 ) I manged to capture another 60 odd 240sec images in late July to add to the data I captured at the end of June ( Trifid Nebula WIP ) Trifid Nebula in Sagittarius ( Messier 20, NGC 6514 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )' and a crop of the main part of the nebula ... I am quite pleased with how the colour balance turned out - especially the colours of the stars ( my goal has been to get the colours of the stars as close as I can to how they would look with "daylight" whitebalance and no light pollution / sky glow). ----------- "High Dynamic Range" ( HDR ) image of the Trifid Nebula - built from exposures ranging from 1/8 to 240 seconds in duration. Image details: from nova.astrometry.net: Size: 52.2 x 35.5 arcmins. Centre: 18h 2 min 30.8 sec, -22deg 57' 37.7''. Orientation: up is -88.2 East of North ( ie. E^ N> ). Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture: 12 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 12 sets. 105 x 240sec main image. 5 each for exposures 1/8 to 120sec - to caputure highlights. HDR combination using Pixinsight's PixelMath function.
  19. Shimmering like a pearl to the naked eye, this open cluster of mostly young blue stars ( known as the "Pearl Cluster" ) is approximately 5500 light years from Earth and was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1752 from South Africa. A Cluster of Pearls in the Southern Skies ( NGC 3766 " The Pearl Cluster" ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be found here ) This HDR image is constructed from 11 sets of exposures ranging from 1/4 sec ( to capture the centre of the brighter stars ) through to 240 seconds ( for the fainter stars of the Milky Way ). Total exposure time was around 5 hours. ..... Image details can be found here
  20. Hi all I was just testing out the scope last light and done some unguided imagine just to get back in the swing of things. The stars in these in this lovely cluster are young, hot supergiant suns that are many thousands of times more luminous than our sun. Date: 09/08/2016 London UK Telescope: Takahashi 130 Camera QSI 690 Mount CEM 60 LRGB 5 x 300 seconds https://flic.kr/p/KY29gd
  21. Bright Nebulae in Corona Australis with the Globula Cluster just over the border in Sagittarius ( NGC 6723, 6726, 6727, 6729 )..by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ) The complex of bright nebula reflects the light from nearby stars and shines out from an area of dense obscuring cloud 400 light years away in the constellation of Corona Australis. Their apparent neighbour in Sagittarius, the globula cluster NGC 6723, is in fact much further away with its light just now reaching us from 28,000 years ago. The bright star in the lower right, Epsilon Coranae Australis, is a yellow-white star twice the size of the Sun and is a relative stone's throw away at 99 light years distance from Earth. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: RA 19h 2m, Dec -36deg 40'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount.Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & UHC-S 'nebula' filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90 20 x 200 sec ISO 800 20 x 15 sec ISO 800 Pixinsight & Photoshop 11 September 2015 ( re-processed 5 Apr 2016 )
  22. The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy ( Messier 83, NGC 5236 ) in the constellation Hydra. Additional sub-images added ( 9 x 3 min @ ISO 200, no filter ) and colour balance tweaked to remove slight yellow/green tinge. The lower ISO and removal of the LP pollution filter has made it easier to bring out the subtle colours in the stars. ( click on image to see fuill size ) Messier 83 is a relatively large and bright spiral galaxy visible from southern and mid latitudes. Clearly visible is the central bar with its bright central bulge as well as multiple dark dust lanes and areas of nebulosity in the sweeping arms. At a distance of 15 Million light years, the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, whilst close in astronomical terms, is too far away and hence way too small for my backyard telescope to resolve individual stars; so all of the stars that can be seen are in fact in the near foreground of the image and reside, like us, in the Milkyway Galaxy. Much harder to see are the many far more distant galaxies that look like tiny fuzzy stars in the image. The easiest of which are PGC 724536 and PGC 48132 that appear close together in the centre of the image just to the right of Messier 83. Both are edge on and look like tiny flying saucers. Details: Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2 software. Nikon D5300 (unmodified) 14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on. 25 June 2016 - Hutech IDAS D1 filter, 17 x 4 min @ ISO 400 28 June 2016 - no filter, 9 x 3 min @ ISO 200 Pixinsight and photoshop. Links: https://500px.com/mikeoday http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Edited June 27 by mike005
  23. I struggled with the colour balance with this one - the 'red' stars in the cluster are still too pink I think. Anyway it is as good as I have been able to get it so far... Bright Nebulae in Corona Australis with the Globula Cluster just over the border in Sagittarius ( NGC 6723, 6726, 6727, 6729 ). The complex of bright nebula reflects the light from nearby stars and shines out from an area of dense obscuring cloud 400 light years away in the constellation of Corona Australis. Their apparent neighbour in Sagittarius, the globula cluster NGC 6723, is in fact much further away with its light just now reaching us from 28,000 years ago. The bright star in the lower left, Epsilon Coranae Australis, is a yellow-white star twice the size of the Sun and is a relative stone's throw away at 99 light years distance from Earth. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: RA 19h 2m, Dec -36deg 40'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 20 x 200 sec, 20 x 15 sec, 20 x 7 sec, 20 x 3 sec, 20 x 1 sec, ISO800. Pixinsight & Photoshop taken 19 Sept 2015 (processed 5 Oct 2015)
  24. Nebulae and Clusters in the North East quadrant of the Small Magellanic Cloud ( Tucana Constellation ) ( NGC 292, 299, 306, 330, 346, 411, 416, 422 ) by Mike O'Day ( 500px.com/MikeODay ) The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is a small spiral galaxy about 7000 light years in diamater and is one of our near neighbours. At 'only' around 200,000 light years distance, it shines brightly in the southern sky and is clearly visible to the naked eye even in moderately ligh polluted skies. Links: 500px.com/MikeODay photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: This image ~ RA 1h 2m, Dec -72deg 2'. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 59 x 200 sec ISO 800 over two nights. Pixinsight & Photoshop 9 September 2015 & 11 October 2015 ( processed 11 Oct 2015 )
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