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Found 132 results

  1. Having missed an idyllic morning last week, I spotted a gap in the forecast which looked like a clear morning sky coming. Not disappointed! I love a waning moon and arrived on site with the grab and go outfit at 3:30 to see the crescent just about 10 degrees above the eastern horizon. This got the first observation as it was bathed in amber hues from our air which give it a rich warmth. Aside from a few wisps and thin films, it was clear and cold. Seeing was good enough to push the mag up high. Jupiter was a beautiful marble at 85x. Two dark barges were very distinct. You know the seeing is not bad when the biggest obstacle becomes your floaters! Mars is looking fabulous though perhaps too low to yield details yet. This May should be good as we near opposition with Mars and Saturn and for us will be very close in the sky. I spent a lot of time just admiring the sky, though other diversions were well worth it: M13 is stunning! I have to shroud my face with my hands to block out any stray light to get best effect. And then those faint little needles of light start to identify themselves briefly. Funny how it comes and goes so must be atmosphere and optics at play. I still cannot get over how huge this thing is. Massive view at 85x and could have piled on more power. On to the Double Double which really needed the barlow at 170x to do the trick. Diffraction rings were not obvious which made me conclude the seeing wasn't as good as I had thought. Down to Steph 1 loose cluster and a quick look around the busy environs of the Ring Nebula. From here it's an easy jaunt down to Albireo with a spectacular show of contrasting amber primary to blue/green companion, which really came out at 85x. Then back to the moon which had risen along with Scorpio. I'm looking at my atlas now and just cannot figure out the huge crater near the middle that seems so prominent in this quarter. Must be the way the light is glancing across the terminator which makes it so much more prominent than the atlas indicates. Theophilus maybe. It has a peak in the middle of the crater. The Finale was Saturn by mistake. Thought this was going to be Antares so gave me a surprise at the EP! A lovely surprise and look forward to May when this is going to be much higher in the sky for observation. The real Antares was actually the last view in the scope before packing up and this is an unbeatable M class. Clear skies
  2. A couple of shots from this morning showing Venus, Mars, Jupiter & Mercury all lined up. Venus, Mars, Jupiter & Mercury by 1CM69, on Flickr Venus, Mars, Jupiter & Mercury by 1CM69, on Flickr
  3. Taken from my home in Tenerife on morning 8 Oct
  4. I have loved astronomy, space and everything related to it for years. Looking at objects in space has often been a challenge, but the rewards are countless. It is always a pleasure looking through the eyepiece and being astounded by what I see, but my greatest pleasure has always been sharing that view. Taking photos and publishing them, is great way of sharing what's up there, getting people thinking about the wider universe we inhabit. It my experience, it's even greater to set the scope up, and then get a friend, neighbour, anyone to look through that eyepiece for themselves, the reaction is often of disbelief, surprise and suddenly for them it seems to click as to why I am constantly going on about space, my telescope and how epic it all is. Just over a year ago, I heard of something called the Virtual Star Party. Thanks to the power of Google+ and Google Hangouts, amateur and professional astronomers are able to stream a live view of what they are looking at through their telescope, to the internet and thus an audience around the world. Having watched several of these hangouts; I quickly realised I wanted to be part of this, to share my passion for astronomy and my view on the universe. This was to me, the ultimate way of sharing. Of course, it's never that simple. I am a bar man, so I work irregular hours, with a changing shift pattern, the weather in England never plays ball and technology can be a fickle thing. The Virtual Star Party is hosted and co-ordinated in America, so time difference, light summer skies and shift patterns normally conspire against me, but this Monday - the 23rd of September 2013 at 4:00 GMT, I was drinking coffee and joining the Virtual Star Party for the first time. Technology was against us, with fellow amateur astronomers suffering from computer issues, communication issues and in my case, the microphone on my webcam dropped out. Gremlins aside, the show went on and for just under an hour we broadcast our view, live to an audience around the world, that hour went fast, and it was fantastic! I will be the first to admit, I was nervous and really didn't know what to do with myself, something that given the chance I want to work on and prepare for a bit next time. Thankfully my seeing was really good that night, my scopes usual gremlins weren't playing up and the sky was crystal clear with no wind present. I opened with my view of Jupiter, it's bands and soft hues showing up wonderfully, the audience would easily be able to tell it's live, given the atmospheric turbulence made it shimmer, and shift, but not so much as to ruin the view. Thanks to my new camera, the ASI120mc and the wonderful FireCapture 2.3 software, I have great exposure control, so could increase and decrease exposure easily and precisely, allowing me to show the four major Galilean moons. As the show went on, I moved over to my view of the Moon, a combination of good seeing and the new HD mode that Google Hangouts delivers, enabled me to really show off the craters, shadows, mountains, surface texture changes and really just enjoy what remains one of my favourite objects to just sit and stare at, for hours and hours! Indeed, this view and the kind commentary from the other astronomers, really helped settle my nerves and just relax and enjoy the moment. The audience seemed to be enjoying the view, asking questions and that really was a pleasure, knowing other people can enjoy what my backyard view has to offer. This technology, this ability to share, with reasonable ease; a view of the solar system and beyond, from a backyard in the middle of suburbia, is in my mind, remarkable and of huge benefit. Rarely people look up, those that do, will spot the Moon, a few stars and wonder as I think most people have, what is out there. Here, with this technology, we can share, explain, with detail and laughs along the way. As the show wrapped up, I moved back to Jupiter - and just as goodbyes where to be said, I spotted the leading edge of the Great Red Spot, something the Virtual Star Party had never seen before, due to timing and other conditions. So there I am frantically trying to get my focus spot on, whilst Fraser and the other astronomers try to spot it. Ultimately we couldn't tell if it was there, or not. So after the show ended, I captured some footage, and stacked it; it was there, the GRS! By this point, it's gone 5:00 in the morning, my fingers are cold, the telescope dripping wet with dew, but the mix of geeky excitement and coffee let me stay up for another hour, to capture for the first time ever , a view of Mars. The sleep deprivation made my shift at work a little bit painful, but I am so glad I finally got to take part in this amazing event, made possible with technology, but passionate, enthusiastic and likeminded people. It was an absolute privilege to do it, and one I hope to repeat often and soon, well assuming those clouds keep away! Images attached where all taken using the following setup: Meade LX90 8" SCT ASI120mc Camera 3x Meade Shorty Barlow for close ups Processed with PIPP, Registax and Photoshop.
  5. From the album: Stargazer33's Album

    C9.25; CGEM; ES 3× tele extender; Zwo ADC; QHY5LIIc Captured in EZP, sorted & centred in PIPP, stacked in Autostakkert2, wavelets in RS6, final processing in PS CS4 extended.

    © Bryan Harrison

  6. From the album: Solar System Objects

    Mars imaged on 10th June 2018 to keep track of the developing dust storm on Mars. This was taken with a Skyris 618C through a 8" SCT and derotated from 7 videos in WinJupos.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  7. From the album: Solar System Objects

    In this image Olympus Mons is visible in the lower right side near the terminator, Tharsis Montes in the middle and a "Y" shaped squiggle in the center right disc is Valles Marinares. This image of Mars was taken using a 8" SCT at 6764mm focal length/f33.3 with a Imaging source 21au618 and Skyris 618C CCDs.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  8. From the album: Solar System Objects

    This image was taken during the night of Mars' closest approach to earth during the 2018 opposition. This image was taken using a 8" SCT at 6764mm focal length/f33.3 with a Imaging source 21au618 and Skyris 618C CCDs.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  9. From the album: Lunar and Planetary Images

    Had another look at my files and I seem to have got a bit more detail out. Thank you everyone for your advice. Mars, Saturn and Jupiter. Taken using QHY5L-II colour planetary camera and 8SE, using a Celestron X-Cel LX 2 x barlow. All AVIs stacked in RegiStax6 and processed in PS Elements 11 (composite image)

    © vicky050373

  10. From the album: Stargazer33's Album

    Mars. C8 XTL, CGEM, Revelation Superfocus 2" R&P focuser, Revelation 2.5x Barlow, QHY5L II Processed in PIPP & RS6

    © Bryan Harrison 2014

  11. Jannis

    Mars

    From the album: Astro Gallery

  12. StarryBob

    Astroshots

    From the album: Starry Bob's Starry Shots

    A compilation of my first tries at webcam photography with an SPC900.

    © StarryBob

  13. The morning before, I was greeted with a close conjunction of Mars and M22 and went into "shutterbug mode", but almost ignored the fact that Saturn was also nearby. After all, the Saturn/Mars conjunction was yet to come (one day later). Well...the next morning, I shot 231 frames of the beautiful Saturn & Mars pairing and here are few of my favorites. I hope you enjoy them, too:
  14. Hi. I’m kind of new to stargazing and I want to view mars. On the website I bought my telescope from it says that planetary observation can be done with clear images being produced but I can’t see much of Mars and I was wondering what eyepiece would be best it has a 114 mm apature. thanks for any help you can provide.
  15. Mars and Deimos, the small natural satellite of the planet Mars GSO 0.20 m Sky-Watcher EQ-5 Pro Deluxe motorized ASI 120MC + IR/UV Cut filter GSO barlow lens 5x (APO) Baader Planetarium IR/UV Cut filter f: 5000 mm f/25 Mars 31/07/2018 01:36 Deimos 31/07/2018 01:21 Matteo Vacca Milis, Italy http://vaccamatteo.weebly.com/ https://www.astrobin.com/users/matteovacca/
  16. No where good enough for the imaging challenge on planets, but my best for a LONG time. I think I've imaged more in the last couple of weeks than I have in the last couple of years! Anyway, for what they're worth here they are: This is an image from Winjupos for Mars at the time of capture: C9.25; CGEM; ES 3× tele extender; Zwo ADC; QHY5LIIc Captured in EZP, sorted & centred in PIPP, stacked in Autostakkert2, wavelets in RS6, final processing in PS CS4 extended.
  17. Well for the first time n what feels like forever we finally had clear skies on a day where I could stay up late without having to get up for work the next morning! Unfortunately I can only operate my equipment from mains power due to my laptop being old and having aduff battery and not owning a power tank, I also can't see any of the planets from my shaded back garden so had to venture out to the front, where Jupiter was setting over neighbouring houses and Mars and Saturn were just peaking through some trees and right over some lovely orange street lights! Talk about challenging! Anyway, heres a little sample of what i caught, not the best I know but forecast is clear again tonight so hoping to have another go. Any advice for improvements welcome. Images were all two minute avi's (captured at 56 ms and gain at 8 out of 10 using Altairs capture software) with usual autostakkert and registax for wavelets. Telescope was Celestron Nexstar SLT (127 mak on supplied goto mount). As I say, if you have any advice please feel free to speak up!
  18. Mars 6-23-16 Cathedral City CA - Nexstar 6se asi120MC-S Here is a shot of Mars taken last night 6-23-16. Mars is shining brightly at the moment, due to its recent opposition last month. The desert heat has limited my deep sky imaging lately due to tons of image noise, but the planets are still shining brightly, as is the moon. This was taken with my new ZWO asi120mc-s planetary camera attached to a Nexstar 6se. This camera blows my old Phillips spc900 webcam out of the water! The surface details really stick out in this one, and you can see cloud formations. This is my best image of Mars...so far! http://coachella-astronomy-astrophotography.blogspot.com/2016/06/mars-6-23-16-cathedral-city-ca-nexstar.html
  19. Finally got a decent view of Venus and Jupiter last night. Yesterday evening was a beautiful end to the day in "darkish" Bedfordshire. Nothing complicated about the images, just the Canon 450 on a tripod. Venus was a fairly easy spot around 8:15 around 5 degrees above the horizon and 20 degrees to the left of where the sun had set. This was taken later once Venus and Jupiter had cleared the cloud bank above. This would have been a straight forward capture if it wasn't for the incredible amount of air traffic, one of my images had 7 aircraft in the field of view! I could hear and see an owl flying around the harvested field in front of me, I was hoping it might perch on one of those branches It was a great night to be out with so many classic sights, that photos really can not do justice to. There was a combine still working away when I left at 10:30, the dust that was slowly drifting though dips in the hills did look very atmospheric.
  20. Hi, using my wacky NexStar SLT and Celestron Mak127 is often frustrating, but when hunting planets it can be rewarding to overcome the limitations. The images are done with a ASI120MC and Firecapture. Used a 3x Barlow. Processed in AS!2, sharpened in Registax, touchups/GIF in GIMP 2.9.x. Cheers, Carsten
  21. Mars - taken last night (4/6/2016) under less than ideal conditions with hazy sky and poor seeing. This is the best shot (so far) out of 11. Mars is already noticeably smaller in appearance since it was in opposition a couple of weeks ago. Unfortunately cloud ended the session before the scope could be turned on to Saturn but hopefully tonight will be better. This image was made from 2000 frames of video. Captured with FireCapture Processed in PIPP, Autostakkert, Registax, and Photoshop Equipment: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT Skywatcher EQ5 Mount ZWO ASI120 MC imaging camera x3 Barlow lens
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