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Found 152 results

  1. Another planetary imaging session, this time with the C8 and the ASI120MC camera. This was the first time I tried to image these with the C8 so something of a 'test'. The log shows that I spent 25 minutes of valuable time in taking the rig down after imaging Jupiter and setting it up in a different position to image the other two planets. Next time I'll put it in a different position that will avoid having to move it. The altitude of Jupiter was about 20 deg, and the other two at around a roof-skimming 10 deg. Unsurprisingly (or otherwise) the results seem a bit better than with the 127mm Mak. In particular, I could easily see the Great Red Spot in the laptop live view. I feel a bit disappointed that Jupiter did not sharpen up more in processing. Here are three of the processed images (processed in Registax6 and should be the noninverted & nonflipped view). Again, not the world's best, but... I focused the camera on Spica. Mars has processed up quite sharp and, again, distinctly non-round (88% phase). But any tips on focussing? there are some apps in Smartcap, or maybe I should get a Bahinov (sp?) mask. I also recorded some .ser video which won't load into Registax for some reason- have to look into why.
  2. This morning I had another go at imaging the planets with my recently acquired ASI120MC camera, and the 127mm Celestron Mak Nexstar SLT. While the images are not that great compared with other peoples' work, I count them as a useful result as they show as much as I could see visually with the same telescope in the same session. In particular, the Jupiter pics clearly show the Great Red Spot, which I could not see visually this morning and have rarely seen with this telescope. The seeing was not great and I have seen more on Jupiter visually on other occasions. One Jupiter image is the correct way round, the other still flipped horizontally. I focused on the moons.
  3. Stu

    Opposition of Mars

    Mars at Opposition, best placed for viewing ie at its largest apparent diameter of 24.3 arc seconds, visual magnitude -2.8 and a distance of 57.8 million km. It transits at 1.15am but at a height of only 13.2 degrees above the horizon from London. Best bet is to get on a plane and head South!
  4. Another early morning conjunction, the Moon will be 15 degrees above the horizon at 5am, with Saturn 4 degrees away and Mars 2.5 degrees from Saturn. A lovely binocular or naked eye sight.
  5. Another tricky low one, but certainly viewable. At 5am Mars will be 10 degrees above the horizon, with Saturn only 1 degree 17" away. Best seen with binoculars or naked eye, telescopic views will likely be poor due to the low altitude.
  6. Stu

    Moon and Mars Conjunction

    A tricky one to see being very low in the sky just before dawn. At 5am the Moon is at around 15 degrees altitude, with Mars just under 3.5 degrees away Best seen with the naked eye or binoculars
  7. I haven't checked, but I am sure there are plenty of these around. I thought I would enter my daylight version as it is a little different. I followed the conjunction until it was lost in the glare and behind buildings, all in all a wonderful morning. Handheld at the eyepiece as normal for me using an iPhone 6 Plus. This is the last one I took that still showed all four moons despite it being 7.41am and relatively bright. Normal kit: Scope: Tak FC100DC (this is getting expensive...) Eyepiece: Need to check this! Will update when I have. Probably 12.5mm BGO at x59. Mount: AZGTi on Gitzo tripod Taken using Procam 4 and cropped and processed using PS Express, all on the phone.
  8. Hi, The link below is for the night sky next week, in the Southern Hemisphere. Because the Moon will be up, it focuses on the Moon, Jupiter, Mars and a few clusters. The night sky for 22-28 January 2018
  9. Did anyone see Jupiter and Mars close together late last night / early this morning ? The Jovian moons were especially impressive as they were bunched up together like cat's eyes on both sides - reminded me a bit of Sigma Orionis
  10. I didn't think I was going to get to see this, as the weather was calling for cloudy skies. However, I rose at 06:00 anyway, got my winter clothes on, grabbed my binoculars and headed out into the cold and snow to see what I could see. Alas, I was rewarded! The planets were higher in the sky than I had anticipated, and the viewing, though a little hazy, was plenty good for seeing the conjunction. There were some nice views of the moon through the haze as well. A nice way to spend a morning. Did anyone else manage to catch a glimpse of this?
  11. Greetings, I thought I'd share with you all this little arty farty collage I made of the moon and some of the planets: Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. All the photos were taken by holding my iPad to my 8inch dob. They were then processed on my iPad and put together on Instagram. Not amazing I know but I was quite chuffed considering my technical limitations. clear skies, Thomas
  12. Hello, i have a presentation for astronomy and I need to understand how Kepler received to find the elliptical orbit of mars. Therefore I use his book Astronomia Nova and due to its hard to comprehend its scientific language, additionally I use this website too: New Astronomy Well, I have difficulties with understand two main aspects: First; In Chapter 51 of Astronomia Nova, Kepler determines the distance between Mars and sun. From that he corrects his hypothesis of chapter 40. (Chapter 56) Picture After that in Chapter 58 is rejects his hypothesis he made in chapter 56. What was the problem? Actually the distances were correct but were the angles wrong? Is that the case? If yes, how can the distances be correct but not the angles? Can anyone tell me the idea behind chapter 56 to 58? Second; In Chapter 40, kepler suggests a model for the orbit of mars. there are also distances from sun to mars. But in Chapter 51 he calculates distances from Mars to Sun again and then he prefers another orbit. Whats the difference between Chapter 40 and 51 with the distances? Due to english is not my first language, maybe i miss some important detail. Thanks
  13. Just joined this forum guys, loving the look and feel of it so far. I am from the UK and my particular obsession is Mars as you can see from my avatar I am a complete newbie so be gentle
  14. From the album: Moon, planets and single stars

    Following on the conjonction of early october (without the moon). Taken from my balcony. Capture: 24 x 1s x 2500iso, no darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Pentacon 50mm/1.8 at 2.8 on fixed tripod.
  15. From the album: Moon, planets and single stars

    Shot of 4-planet conjonction of october 2015, visible only between 6:00 and 7:00 CET just before sunrise. Discovered only afterwards that the stabilisation of the camera was active, producing visible trails. Unfortunately weather of the following days didn't allow another try shot. Capture: 19 x 1/4s x 1600iso, no darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Pentacon 50mm/1.8 at 2.8 on fixed tripod.
  16. The Moon joins the planets for this evenings showdown through a halo of river mist. Planets Mars & distant Neptune at upper left with Venus at lower right below the Moon. Pentax K5 Pentax 75mm lens @ f11 Exp 15 secs tracking iso 800 Moon & planets in evening mist halo 2nd Jan 2017 by Mike Dickson, on Flickr
  17. Hey SGL, So i have just got out my telescope for the first time and was able to locate Mars so thought i would take a look. So i have set up my Skywatcher 150p and am unable to see anything worthwhile... All i see is a slightly red looking sphere with absolutely no detail whatsoever... I googled to see what Mars should look like through a telescope and it is nothing like what i can see! Here are the eyepieces i have been using: (all came with the telescope) 10mm 25mm Wide Angle 2x Barlow So i am able to achieve on my 750mm scope a max of 150x magnification i think (2x Barlow with the 10mm eyepiece), is this not enough to see a clear picture or is there something else wrong with my telescope? According to the seller of the telescope it was ready to go with no need to calibrate so i am a little confused... Any help would be great! Thanks
  18. timwetherell

    Sketch of mars

    From the album: Astro sketches

    Sketch of mars through my 7" refractor. Very low to the horizon so a fair bit of atmospheric dispersion and a lot of "shimmer" but the polar cap and some features were still visible even this far past opposition (November 29, 2016)
  19. hi, the coordinates for m39 open cluster is ra 21h31m7s,dec 48 27 0,azimuth 10 38 55,alt 53 35 27..how to set this in my eq mount telescope..my scope is celestron 130eq...if i learnt this it will be easy for me..i tried INTERNET but don't know to set in scope...
  20. Finally got a decent view of Venus and Jupiter last night. Yesterday evening was a beautiful end to the day in "darkish" Bedfordshire. Nothing complicated about the images, just the Canon 450 on a tripod. Venus was a fairly easy spot around 8:15 around 5 degrees above the horizon and 20 degrees to the left of where the sun had set. This was taken later once Venus and Jupiter had cleared the cloud bank above. This would have been a straight forward capture if it wasn't for the incredible amount of air traffic, one of my images had 7 aircraft in the field of view! I could hear and see an owl flying around the harvested field in front of me, I was hoping it might perch on one of those branches It was a great night to be out with so many classic sights, that photos really can not do justice to. There was a combine still working away when I left at 10:30, the dust that was slowly drifting though dips in the hills did look very atmospheric.
  21. Before I focused on meteors (got clouded out ), I took advantage of a break in the clouds in the southern sky and took this wide-angle shot of the beautiful triangle formed by Saturn (top), Antares (bottom left) and Mars (bottom right) in Scorpius. The waxing gibbous moon is hiding behind a tree branch. Going to try for some Perseids all this weekend while dodging clouds!
  22. After a few nice views of the sun today in the 4", I switched out the Herschel Wedge for the Zeiss prism, Barlow and Leica zoom to have a go at Mars and Saturn. I wasn't expecting much after such a hot day, but the reality was far better, some of my best views of these two this year. As ever, I'm a little uncertain of the mag because of the exact spacing with the Barlow, but I was probably maxing out at x180 or so, but possibly x200. Detail was visible even at much lower levels. Emphasising the beauty of this setup, I only had about 15 mins to observe, so I carried it down to the bottom of the garden where I get a clear view of the two planets, had some nice views, then just packed up quickly, all done in about 25 mins I should think. Anyway, on to the views. Mars immediately looked great, the seeing was good, and surprisingly steady. The phase was clear, Syrtis Major obvious, and defined well. I could see the north polar cap, getting obscured by the phase now. To the south, Hellas Planitia showed as a bright area, looking a little like a big polar cap but more orange than white. These views were unfiltered, the sky background was bright and Mars itself a pale orange colour. I popped the Mars B filter in and immediately the sky background was virtually black, giving Mars a nicer apparent contrast. Mars itself appeared a deeper orange colour, more Mars like if you will . Syrtis Major appeared darker and slightly better defined, but Hellas Planitia was dimmed and I lost the polar cap. The Mars B didn't show any more detail (based on this brief view), but I did enjoy the views as an alternative. I need to try the less aggressive Mars A filter which may be a better compromise. Should also give the Neodymium a go too which is very effective on Mars, but not Saturn for some reason. Note to self, probably should get a filter slide for my 1.25" filters to make comparisons easier, I have plenty of infocus range so it should work fine. One obvious statement is the importance of focus in picking out the detail. Very small tweaks on the fine focuser significantly improved the views so it's well worth getting it right, and using a dual speed focuser if you can. On to Saturn, and again the best and steadiest views I've had this year. The Cassini division was very clear other than the thin section infront of the planet where I lost it. It was visible most of the time, but became vague when the seeing dropped off every now and then. This was only a quick session so my recall of features is a bit hazy! A and B rings were clear. I believe I saw the Crepe ring in front of the planet, but need to verify again whether this was the case. The darker section in the B ring was visible, as was shading/banding on the surface. The only moon I could detect was Titan as it was still too bright for the others; I know that at least 5 are visible in this scope under good conditions. So, a long report on a short session. I'm mainly writing it because I don't seem to have had much luck with these two so far this year, either too low, poor seeing, cloud or too busy so these views were very welcome. It's often said (by me too!) that you need to spend a long time observing to pull out the detail in planets, well last night that was not the case, detail was clear right from the start. I could have spent an hour on them, but Mrs Stu was ready to turn in, and I know better than to disobey the CEO . The images attached are approximations of what I saw, or at least they are on my iPhone. The main difference with Mars is that I could see the polar cap (in the unfiltered view) which has been lost in this image which is more similar to the filtered view. Saturn is shown against a brighter background as it was unfiltered. They may be too large a scale on a full screen, so don't look too closely . Just trying to give a rough idea without having done a sketch.
  23. We finally had a clear night here so I had a go at Saturn and Mars even though they are fading now. I used the C9.25 with a flip mirror and 2.5 Powermate with the ASI224MC. If only I could have done this earlier I'm sure that the results would have been better. Anyway, thanks for looking. Peter
  24. Hiya ... despite being knackered yesterday (after a long day out in Weymouth hanging around while my eldest son did two shows in the chorus of the musical Joseph), I really needed a night out under the stars ... Got home at about 11.15, and was set up with the dob at around 11.30 (still twilight!). I started off with Mars and Saturn. Had a good look at Mars, but couldn't detect any detail. Saturn was fantastically crisp at x136 in the ES/82 8.8mm: clear Cassini division, surface banding ... The Milky Way soon appeared as a soft cloud overhead, lacking the fizzy sparkliness of other nights, but nice nonetheless. The Veil neb in my ES/62 24mm plus OIII filter was okay, not great. In fact, although seemingly clear, fainter objects and nebulosity was underwhelming (M31, 51, 81, 82, M16), and lacking in detail. Star clusters, though, were amazing. M11, M3 & lots of other 'couldn't be bothered to identify' clusters in the Milky Way were all fantastic! M3 (I know, not in the MW!) in the ES 8.8 in particular, was lovely; really dense, like fine salt grains ... The night was looking like it might be spoiled by a local 'party' that seemed to go wrong, with arguments and shouting emanating from a local farm, storming's off, more shouting, a girl crying, a shotgun blast (!), more crying, then drunken laughter, recriminations, then more storming's off, a pickup truck screeching off, then back ... honestly! Anyway, I was thinking of packing up around 1.00 anyway, as the waning moon was due to clear the hills, whereupon the 'party' seemed to calm down for a bit, so I thought I'd take a look at the moon before heading for bed. By this point I'd kind of resorted to scanning around with my 10x50s, and pointed them at the moon as it rose ... Then ... hang on, what's that? That doesn't look like a background star ... out with Stellarium on the phone and, 'Wow!' That's Neptune (in the same FOV as the moon!). What an amazing sight. I quickly switched to the scope, and tried a variety of EPs. The planet remained a shimmery orb, but a truly magical one at that. I hung around for another 20 minutes or so, entranced by the combination of our planet's satellite and the distant ice giant, before finally packing up. Amazing. As it turned out, I might as well have stayed out. Didn't get to sleep for ages, as I was buzzing from such a fantastic experience. Cheers, Kev
  25. Well for the first time n what feels like forever we finally had clear skies on a day where I could stay up late without having to get up for work the next morning! Unfortunately I can only operate my equipment from mains power due to my laptop being old and having aduff battery and not owning a power tank, I also can't see any of the planets from my shaded back garden so had to venture out to the front, where Jupiter was setting over neighbouring houses and Mars and Saturn were just peaking through some trees and right over some lovely orange street lights! Talk about challenging! Anyway, heres a little sample of what i caught, not the best I know but forecast is clear again tonight so hoping to have another go. Any advice for improvements welcome. Images were all two minute avi's (captured at 56 ms and gain at 8 out of 10 using Altairs capture software) with usual autostakkert and registax for wavelets. Telescope was Celestron Nexstar SLT (127 mak on supplied goto mount). As I say, if you have any advice please feel free to speak up!
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