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Dave S

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About Dave S

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    Proto Star

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  • Location
    Belper, Derbyshire
  1. @Coto I agree totally that a lot of cheap electronics can be less than perfect (usually a lot less) I try to source from reliable manufacturers. My preferred one is NooElec as I've used them on quite a few occations and find their products good quality and they have a support centre in the UK. The LNA I chose fits the bill for my needs as I'm not looking for huge signal gain and it doesn't have to perform perfectly to justify the £12 spent. There are Radio Amateur equipment suppliers that will stock quality LNA's in narrower bandwidths but we're now talking expense. The bandpass filter is wise addition as my experience with the RTL-SDR dongles is that certain powerful local signals can clamp down the front end of the receiver causing a sudden drop in the signals you are monitoring. I've been recently working 137MHz but a local pager transmitter running in the 140MHz area periodically kills the signal strength of the frequencies I'm using. It's not a big problem as I think the Interference needs to be within a few MHz. The RTL-SDR dongles have a bandspread of 2-3MHZ so they can continuously display that range. That's probably too narrow for other type of interferece to be a problem. I'm not suggesting that they will work for your needs but lo cost solutions will always have limitations in it's results but at the low cost it's well worth a try. If you're working 432MHZ at high gain and sensitivity be aware that there's a whole host of devices operating at around 433MHz. These include car key fobs, baby monitors, home weather stations and cursedly no licence required walky talkies. 433 is the low power unlicensed device mini band. Please post your progress as I would love to see how it goes. Cheers Dave...
  2. Hi Coto Does it need to be centred at 422Mhz? I use Wideband LNA's which run from about 1MHz - 2GHz They are very cheap ( I just ordered another from Amazon this evening). I depends on whether your receiver is nice and selective or suffers from strong local interference from other frequencies. I assume that you have a dish setup for narrow area reception and as you are pointing skyward then a wideband should be ok so long as your connecters and feerder cable are good. I've been experimenting with software defined radio and home brew antennas to receive and decode images from the NOAA satellites. This is the one I've just ordered. https://www.amazon.co.uk/0-1-2000MHz-Broadband-Amplifier-Radio-Module/dp/B076631WKC/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1548625234&sr=8-6&keywords=lna Dave...
  3. Oops missed the obvious. I've just finished a ten hour shift at work so the brain isn't fully operational. Here in the UK first light optics are a trusted favourite and they ship internationally. They even have currency conversion on the website. I don't know what the shipping costs are as they are calculated at checkout. They do the absolute all in bundle for £269gbp which even includes counterweights and dovetail L bracket. https://www.firstlightoptics.com/skywatcher-star-adventurer/skywatcher-star-adventurer-astronomy-bundle.html I don't know of any European suppliers so I don't have any comparable prices.
  4. They're both quite similar in specs but the star adventurer has a quoted payload of 5kg compared to the ioptrons 3kg. The ioptrons is a smaller and lighter mount but both are quite portable. The star adventurer comes with the ball head mount as standard whereas the ioptrons is an optional extra. An equitorial wedge is available for the star adventurer for a measly £45. Finally the biggest difference is the price. Star adventurer £195 Skytracker £350 Both have excellent reviews. Only my personal choice, but I'd be going for the star adventurer plus wedge for £240 all in. No doubt there are fans of both here on sgl so would be interesting to hear their take on it. Dave...
  5. No they have a standard power socket which the standard lead available from just about all astro suppliers fits. http://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/rother-valley-optics-power-cables.html Other suppliers are available. Dave...
  6. A lovely example of where diffraction spikes enhance the image not detract from it.
  7. The three washers glued to the patio so I can locate the tripod precisely and start from the home position and get set up and aligned quickly. A close second is my cat. Great lap warmer. She doesn't like it as a dew shield though. ?
  8. What davey-t means is that the st4 port on the camera connects directly to the st4 port on the mount. No usb to serial required. The usb on the camera then connects to usb on the pc so PhD can see the guide star selected. Daft question but you do have a guide scope and camera in addition to your main scope? It's not clear what setup you have. Dave...
  9. +1 BackyardNikon Changed the whole game when I started using BackyardEOS. Dave...
  10. I'd say more than seems. For that money I could replace my mount scope and camera with some quality items.
  11. I suppose as an integrated system it's a sound idea. They state it uses the Sony imx224 sensor which is the sensor used in the gpcam2. If you have a scope already then £190 will get you a gpcam then just add laptop. As stated it is an amalgamation of existing technologies rather than a new system. Still quite nifty looking if you don't want the hassle of a laptop in tow.
  12. Check your insurance. You may need to specify individual items due to their value. Don't forget continental mains leads. Dave...
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