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GothicFighter

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Everything posted by GothicFighter

  1. True. Grandpas, here I come. More close-to-reality photos: That thing in the second photo is the roof of the balcony.
  2. A few minutes ago I had a huuuuge surprise. I looked up at the sky and stood there with my jaw opened for a couple of seconds. I've never seen so many stars in my life. And I thought I lived in a light polluted area. Well, the previous observations were easy to do cuz' there were only a few stars visible. But now... I get lost among all those stars. Here's a cropped photo showing Alderbaran and M45. I tell you, it looks 10x better in reality then in the photo+i could'nt capture the stars above(4th floor balcony).
  3. Amazingly clear sky tonight. Took 2 more photos from the small balcony. Same camera, same settings.
  4. First one, second one and third one. --- After weeks of cloudy skies I've managed to get a clear sky night(by accident. Just got out to take a clean gulp of air when I've seen it). Oh well, I've learned 2 more constellations. Too freezing cold to make hand-drawn sketches but I've managed to get a couple of photos. G'night lads.
  5. Thanks! Well, I'll buy my first pair a binoculars in about 2 months(a Celestron Skymaster 15x70 ) so nothing expensive(for now, of course ) @jgs001 Indeed, it was a single image. I've heard about the software but does it actually do something if I only stack images with the same exposure etc.? @spaceboy The camera was on a simple tripod(which I'll use for the binoculars). The photo was took in 8 seconds so I don't think there was a need for a tracking mount. Thanks again for the feedback. Let's hope I get clear sky soon.
  6. Well, here is it lads. Finally got a relatively clear sky. Still some clouds roaming around but it's OK. My first photo of the sky ever took: Samsung ES-10 point-and-shoot digital camera. 8s shutter speed ISO 400 I'm pretty excited. There are stars that I couldn't see with my naked eyes that showed up in the photo. Really surprised.
  7. Well, here is it lads. Finally got a relatively clear sky. Still some clouds roaming around but it's OK. My first photo of the sky ever took: Samsung ES-10 point-and-shoot digital camera. 8s shutter speed ISO 400 I'm pretty excited. There are stars that I couldn't see with my naked eyes that showed up in the photo. Really surprised. Also I'm going to edit the image(crop, maybe add some annotations) and post it again. I'm also going to make more photos tonight:D
  8. Beautiful image. What software have you used for stacking?
  9. Thanks a lot. Your comment helped me a lot. And as a fun fact, just a minute ago I found out that my digital point-and-shot cheap camera(samsung es10) had customizable settings(including ISO,exposure,lots of image quality settings)... Thanks God I've found it. I will most certainly use the digital for now(easier). Next time I get a clear sky I will take a photo and post it here.
  10. Hey. I'm into astronomy for ~1 month. I know the basics(stars, constelations,nebulas,messier obects etc.). Until I get a pair of binoculars I though I'd start doing some photos of the sky. My dad has one camera. It's an old "Minolta Maxxum HTsi", it's not digital(it has film) and I've found the manual for it. Kind of overwhelminn. I know absolutely nothing about cameras. It got a lens which has zoom and focus. If it help, I can tell you what's written on it: "AF ZOOM 28-80mm 1:3.5(22)-5.6, 62mm". Whatever that means. Anyway, I need some basic tutorials. I want some easy, free lessons but which explain every single bit(ISO,exposure,lens etc.). I've also got one tripod with a weight hook which I think is necessary. Thanks in advance and sorry for the non-knowledge. edit: ISO goes up to 6400 and aperture up to 22. Is it good enough for astrophotography?
  11. Hey. I'm into astronomy for ~1 month. I know the basics(stars, constelations,nebulas,messier obects etc.). Until I get a pair of binoculars I though I'd start doing some photos of the sky. My dad has one camera. It's an old "Minolta Maxxum HTsi", it's not digital(it has film). I know absolutely nothing about cameras. It got a lens which has zoom and focus. It writes "AF Zoom" "0.38 m/1.3ft MACRO" and "AF 28-80". Anyway, I need some basic tutorials. I've tried searching but I only hit sites like "buy this book to learn" blah blah. I want some easy, free lessons. First on what all those lens do, and then about exposure, ISO and stuff. I've also got one tripod with a weight hook. Thanks in advance and sorry for the non-knowledge.
  12. I suppose you mounted it in the telescope's eyepiece? Although you've said nothing about a telescope in your post
  13. All Mass Effect books by Drew Karpyshyn. Love the game and love the books.
  14. I've done this High Resolution Sky Map using the latest pdf from here Done this because I can just copy it to my camera, go out to stargaze and zoom in the photo too see what star is that, what cluster and the like. You can also print it and make a rotating thing of those. Useful for those without a laptop/notebook but with a phone/digital camera. http://img34.imageshack.us/img34/8885/skymap.png
  15. Thank you for the fast reply. @Helen Nice to hear that . @crazyjedi My folks live at ~1 and a half hours away(14km from the city). So they're kind of close by. As for the heat, the only heat source from the apartments below is from the heating system(it exhausts through a small tube) but it's near the left side of the balcony. @Taff I've already got a tripod with a weight hook so shacking won't be a problem. Thanks again for your answers.
  16. For the last month or so I've been stargazing(naked eyes) almost every night(when the sky's clear). I've learned different stars, constellations and such. I live in an apartment at the third floor(and a lamp post in front of the apartment building). When I stargaze I go out in the small balcony, which is facing South. This is where the problem arrives. I can only watch South and a little bit East and West but I can never see what's in North. Just as a example, I can never see Polaris(from Ursa Major) or Cassiopeia. Of course, I could go to my grandparents which live in a remote village with no light pollution and with a great open area(never been there since I've started stargazing) but it'd be only for a short time(weekends or holidays) and it's not guaranteed that the sky is gonna be clear. So, in a couple of months or so plan on buying a pair of binoculars(Celestron Skymaster 15x70). Am I missing much considering I can only see what's in the Southern part of the sky? Is it even worth it to go only 1-2 nights to watch the whole nigh sky? TL;DR: I can only see what's in the South, SE/SW part of the sky,never what's in the Northern part. I can go to a clear site only for a short amount of time. Worth getting a pair of binoculars?
  17. That's exactly what I did. I though it was just me but it seems I was wrong.
  18. You can definetelly see it. It a bit up and to the right of Aldebaran(which itself is above Orion.) You can see it as a blue fuzz in sky.
  19. I was playing around with a digital camera in the balcony(small one that you can get at every multimedia store) and took several photos of the sky(crystal clear). Out of 5 photos, one showed something rather interesting: I've cropped that part of the photo(it was huge,~3000 by something). It's the bottom part. Could the object in the right be Sirius and the purple thing on the left M47?
  20. Thanks a lot for the replies. Unfortunately the sky has been foggy for 3 days so no observation could be done
  21. First one and the second one. --- Good evening! Or should I say excellent evening? The latter seems the best to describe it. Yesterday was (again) cloudy. Today I'm lucky and I've managed to get the clearest sky yet. It's ~8:30PM here. And as a random fact, I just managed to learn how much I can see through my tiny balcony, with the 4 story apartment building in front of me: From 10* on the Azimuthal grid to 70*. That's like A LOT considering my location. Anyway, tonight my point of reference is Jupiter. Here's today's sketch: As you can see, I've managed to draw some of the most important/bright stars near Jupiter(The Great Square of Pegasus my favorite for now:evil6:). I've also found a new constellation Aries and Triangulum(I had a hard time getting this one right. Lots of stars nearby.) Also got an idea of where Andromeda might be situated. Now, I have some(retarded,n00bish,beginner's) questions: 1)Are the star's location/position going to be the same next winter/season? 2)How can I keep track of what I've found? There are hundreds of stars in the sky and I think I got to have some kind of point of reference to finding something. So far I've got 2 of those(Orion's Sword and Jupiter/The Great Square of Pegasus) but there are only for winter and only for small portions of the sky. 3)Do you really have to learn all those stars' names? So far I did and they are quite easy to remember since I associate the name with something that sounds like something in real life or it's funny/weird(Betegeusel - BeetleJuice, Alhena-Athena,Sheat - Shi...:icon_scratch:You get the point.) That's all for now. It's only 9PM so I think I have time to observe the sky(not writing other stars since they'd be too many to learn) Happy observing! Edit: I got out after staying a bit inside and and right when I looked up, near Orion's Sword, I've see a falling star! This is actually the second or third time I see one. It all happened really fast, like in one second
  22. That looks fantastic! The colors and everything. Thanks for sharing.
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