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spaceboy

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Everything posted by spaceboy

  1. So I remember Black OTA Helios with gun metal mounts. Then came a not so nice ?? sky blue ?? Skywatcher with hammerite black mount. Occasional during this period found a darker more fetching blue OTA only to my knowledge found upon the Evostar. My assumption is it was for a different country. Also I believe the release of a pro edition gold OTA hit the scene not long after. On to today and the much more stylish black diamond OTA and white mounts. I kinda like the black diamond scopes and so to the white mounts despite them showing up every little mark and prone to yellowing after time. But the time will come when Skywatcher will want to revitalise the sales and distinguish new from old by coming out with another colour. What colour do you think it might be they come up with next ? ............................................. My guess, pearlescent or metal flake white OTA with black mount again And what colours would you want to see? ............................................................................ My preference, either solid or flake red and again while I like the white mounts I'd favour going graphite grey/black with the mounts as they are easier to keep looking fresh.
  2. Being able to fit larger DSO in due to a faster focal length.
  3. How do those stubbies cope with coma? I assume if you have one your going to have already made the decision to go TV with EP's and no doubt have a CC but even so that one has got to be around the f/3 -3.5 territory. Are coma correctors really that good at cleaning up coma ?? I imagine there is more than your fair share of stars showing up in such a large mirror so there is no escaping stars sat towards the edges, along with any seagulls.
  4. At what point would you stop and think ...."maybe I might have over done it this time??" I've never had the luxury of looking through anything this big but even if the views are breath taking, mind blowing, astro wonders, I doubt you'd get me up the ladder in the first place. I mean even a rough estimate I'm guessing you near second floor height there and lets be honest a lot of people have died or seriously injured themselves falling from similar heights. I sure wouldn't feel comfortable balancing those ladders on grass even if the fall was going to be softer. On another note just how practical would a scope like this be? I mean moving it to targets must be a challenge and to keep it on target while you set up ladders and make the climb, not to mention tracking said object. Is there a point when a scope is so big its impractical for anything other than a proper observatory ? I know many do this but I'd struggle to see where the enjoyment is when your risking life and limb. I can't imagine its the most comfortable of observing positions.
  5. I thought it would add a sort of realism to the question. It would after all only take a small windfall for some people to be able to pack up and move to an ideal location but not necessarily without the need to continue to work. When you take working out of it your talking big money lottery wins which is even less likely to happen.
  6. From an astronomers point of view just say you won enough money to allow yourself to choose any location to live. Not enough that you could give up work so you would still need to make a living. Where would that location be for you? Personally I'd like to settle somewhere along the hemispheres as the southern sky sure seems to offer a lot of wonders but then I have been brought up on the north and have my favorites. Needless to say I'd prefer to avoid sitting directly under two weather cells as we do in the UK but I would like a mix of weather as I can imagine too much of one thing even if it be glorious sun shine would become mundane. Altitude would be a bonus to get above any fringing in the distance light pollution, and clean air to breath (observe through) would be a number one priority. Does such a location exist or do you have to go off the grid ? Where does Hawaii stand given people live the dream and you could set up scope at mauna kea?
  7. How do you mean John? The one thing that appealed to me most was the cell was collimatable on top of it being a doublet and not having a 3rd lens to worry about if the scope ever did take a knock. The doublet advantage being based on talk that loosening of the lens and gently tapping around the cell often sits doublets back in to place with in the cell should the untoward ever happen??? Between that and a collimateable cell you'd always have the piece of mind your collimation at least was going to be bang on, which for a large CA potentially producing refractor is a plus.
  8. But are you not collecting more light by using the bins? Increasing aperture? Same as a larger exit pupil. Your not making the object brighter but collecting more light from that object so "making it brighter to the eye"
  9. Well this has sure put my mind at rest. I'd long regretted not pulling the trigger on a 152ED when one came up for a fairly reasonable price. All I could think was the mention that the ES ED127 f/7.5 showed some fringing and that was supposed to be a better corrected triplet so I sat on my hands. With the larger 152 f/7.9 being a doublet with FPL51 I'm guessing the views could be quite colorful for an "ED APO"
  10. So the dob mob don't really need a lot of ep's but wide for are an advantage. Also on another note when we say magnification is it so that we don't actually magnify the image. ie: get any closer to the subject as the subject remains in the same place relative to us. So aperture is king because this increases the brightness and in doing so makes the object easier to see. Which is kinda why we want to up the "mag" despite not actually gaining anything from doing that, as while we make the object appear larger it is also duller so in truth our eyes see less. So is this where your ep choice comes from Shane? Exit pupil has more gain than magnification. I admit I always try to keep to the 1mm rule for solar unless the seeing is exceptional where I take it to stupid floater filled 0.3 territory.
  11. You'll have to work with me on this. I sort of know what I want to ask but I'm reading it and I can't get in a limited amount of text the question I think I'm trying to ask.
  12. I get what you are saying but leading on from my last post, would a 10" APO be simply unrealistic price wise when you consider what you could achieve with an achromat for similar money. All totally hypothetical of course. I guess what I mean is at what size would the benefits of an APO outweigh the cost ??
  13. Not terrible false colour in the ES ED127 I might add !!!!!!!!! but fringing none the less.
  14. This is interesting. Is the ES127 FPL51 or similar spec as I have seen reviews suggest this also shows false colour which I found odd as it's a triplet and only has 7mm over the ED120 which tend to only show fringing in defocused stars.
  15. Mounting and other issues aside, I assume there comes a point where achromats start to come in to their own? or are bespoke larger refractors just expensive no matter what glass is in them? I see some "budget" 152 mm ED refractors for £3k so surely you'd get a lot of achromat for that money ??
  16. I don't think you'd be disappointed. I have the ED120 and 200P f/5 and feel they complement each other well. I have a giro ercole so if I choose can use both at the same time. If all your used to are refractor views it is worth noting that the edges in an f/5 may be a tad distracting due to coma. You could always get a coma corrector but this is why I originally recommended the slower f/6 dobsonian. It will still show coma but not quite so predominantly. Getting the dob also gives you the option of using both scopes at the same time and if you wanted you could just get ota rings for the newt and use it on the HEQ5. Obviously if your short on space it is easier to hide an ota in the back of a closet than it is a whole dobsonian.
  17. I owned and absolutely adored a 6" EVO f/8 for many months. Then I came across an ED120 and after only using it twice I sold the EVO. There is nothing quite like owning a large refractor but you'd be surprised how much good glass can make a difference even in a smaller scope. If you want to up the aperture and see deeper then your best bet is a skyliner 200P. No CA, still manageable even for 8" aperture and a tried and trusted mount. The slower f/6 200p is more forgiving of eyepieces and holds collimation well. Would complement the ED120 and cover most of your needs.
  18. Thanks Ronin. You have kind of answered what I was thinking it would be. I just can't imagine what the view would be all that great in a plossl given the image scale quickly fills the fov in larger scopes.
  19. This may sound like a stupid question but what eyepieces do the dob mod use? With long focal lengths and large image scale offered by 16" + light buckets there doesn't leave much in wider field eyepieces at the focal lengths needed to keep magnifications within seeing conditions of the UK. Or do bigger dobs allow for higher magnifications as the image is more resolved and brighter ??
  20. PERFECT!! Just doesn't get much more grab and go that that ! Only shame is I can't see where you could squeeze a 9x30 in there.
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