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Hawksmoor

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Blog Comments posted by Hawksmoor


  1. Surely for one moon to partially eclipse another, they would have to be almost in alignment and that is clearly not the case here.

    Thanks for your comment.  As you say, for an eclipse to occur the two moons and the sun would need to be in alignment but our position as observer on Earth does not need to be on the same line. My thought was that my view was  at an oblique angle to the line of the eclipse. Hopefully this makes sense of the image?


  2. Thanks for all your comments. I'm never too sure what I'm doing astronomy wise and electronically speaking a red mist descended somewhere after valves but before printed circuits. Anyway I followed the instructions found on the Internet and in the Sky and Night Magazine and low and behold it actually works. I too have encountered the Vista Spectrum Lab software issue and had to borrow my wife's laptop that runs using Windows 7.  It would have been helpful if Maplins provided a 'how to' sheet in with the BNC coax connector. Lots of cursing and the plug still drops off if I look at it. Grrr! The FunCube Dongle Pro+ and supporting software all works well. Very efficiently provided by Howard at Halincrest Ltd. The Yagi aerial works nicely and I have captured a few meteors. Saving up for a second hand computer to wire up and leave running in monitor mode.


  3. Great sketch ! Tad complicated is some understatement of a big draftsmanship challenge.

    When above my horizon I always like to take a look at the double cluster particularly through my 11x80 bins (as the FOV covers both clusters). When I look up at them they seem quite timeless and remote, an unchanging stellar landscape that's complex but instantly recognizable.

    • Like 1

  4. Hi Isabelle

    Nice photographs. We were in Kent visiting friends this weekend. I'm afraid I did hype it up a bit. In the event clouds and rain precluded any view of the moon. Hope the weather does not wash out the transit of Venus. I aim to photograph the sun rising over the North Sea whilst the transit is in progress.

    best regards George


  5. I tried to look at your picture but the page was empty. I have been wanting a prize picture of Mars myself but unfortunately' date=' I am ill equipped!

    Isabelle[/quote']

    Hi Isabelle

    Sorry! I have been messing around with the image and severed the link by mistake. I have edited the blog and pasted a thumbnail of the latest version.

    Spacecowboy has some brilliant images of Mars in one of his albums. They blow my effort right out of the water! However, I'm still pleased I was able to get an image at all. It is a very small planet and a long way away!

    best regards George


  6. nice image nothing wrong with that' date='do not forget these Pros on here have huge amounts of cash and the best of every thing ,your image is great try working on it a bit more with some layers and masks ect

    nice image:)[/quote']

    Thanks for the encouragement. Will follow your suggestions and see if I can improve it. Biggest kick I get is from just looking upon an alien world so very far away.

    best regards George aka Hawksmoor


  7. nice image keep up the good work,hope the back and hip is do in well

    Thank you, my back is enforcing a certain lack of mobility but in the meantime I'm doing lots of stuff I've put off (e.g I made solar filters for my travel scope etc) and my wonderful wife is spoiling me rotten by doing all the housework etc). I had another go at the ring nebula and have pulled out some detail inside the ring. I've put a copy of this latest image in my Backyard Astronomy Album. best regards George.


  8. Very nice photo of the crescent Moon. Have been getting some lovely views here in Suffolk England. I admire your astronomic perseverance in -21 deg C. Never mind that the wind wasn't blowing. I rarely go out when the temperature drops below 0 degs.

    I've never been able to see the Rosette nebula through my scope either and I've not tried to photograph it, but some of the deep sky imagers on SGL have more than done it credit. The scallops sound good. best regards George

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