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Anakin Skywalker

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About Anakin Skywalker

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  1. Thank you for the info! really apppreciate it! May the Force be with you.
  2. Hello everyone, I am now in the process of completing the write up for a science project on parallax and I came across a question which I need an answer in order to explain my project. (google was no help cuz already tried that and couldnt find a correct answer) How do astronomers actually measure the parallax angle of a star? do they use any special equipment or do they calculate it mathematically? and can someone explain the equation d = 1/p which is used to calculate stellar distances in parsecs and how it relates to the earth-sun distance(if it does) and parallax angle?
  3. Hello again everyone, I am now in the process of completing the write up for my parallax project and I came across a question which I need an answer in order to explain my project. (google was no help cuz already tried that and couldnt find a correct answer) How do astronomers actually measure the parallax angle of a star? do they use any special equipment or do they calculate it mathematically? and can someone explain the equation d = 1/p which is used to calculate stellar distances in parsecs and how it relates to the earth-sun distance and parallax angle?
  4. Indeed! A very good atrempt with awesome results! well done!! a few days ago i had a go at photographing the milky way with my Nikon D3500 DSLR while i was taking pictures of Jupiter and Saturn with my Celestron Nexstar 6 SE SCT, i had to lie down on the wet ground and position my camera tripod with one hand while handling the camera with the other. The thing was the ground was slanted at an angle and if i let go of the tripod it would just fall over. And i was doin all this while it was freezing cold (about 2-3 degrees celcius) and my fingers were numb! but it was worth it! got some really gr
  5. I got a good view of Jupiter and Saturn a few nights ago in the evening at about 7.30 p.m. These are a few pics taken using my Samsung galaxy A20 smartphone and Celestron Nexstar 6SE SCT. Pretty satisfied with the results and with a little bit of playin around with contrasts and stuff, produced some pretty good results. Jupiter with great red spot visible (barely!) Jupiter with the 4 Galilean moons Saturn Saturn zoomed Here's To clear skies☄ May the Force be with you.
  6. Thank you! Yes it makes a big difference. And your welcome! May the Force be with you.
  7. Even though i'm not new to Astrophotography, I haven't tried getting some good Milky Way shots in becuase where i used to live you could barley see it, but now i live at a new location with much less pollution and you can see the Milky very well with your naked eyes. These arer some of my recent shots of the Milky way using a Nikon D3500 DSLR mounted on a simple tripod, with ISO:12800-25600 , exposure time: 10 sec. f/3.5 18 mm. You can also see Jupiter and Saturn int the background (bright two stars close to each other). Editing-wise, i didnt do much of anything except tweaking and enhanc
  8. Wowzers! I have yet to see it too! I actually have never seen a comet in real life, only in pictures. And i do not want to miss this great opportunity. Does anyone know the best time to observe the comet and when is it visible in the Southern hemisphere? (namely, in Tasmania!), according to Stellarium, the comet will only be visible only after sunset and wont be visible in the mornings ( i might be wrong tho). AWESOME picture btw, good on you!
  9. thank you for the great info! they were a great help. May the force be with you.
  10. That would be awesome if you could actually do that! maybe if you build a time machine and take measurements now and go forward a 120 million yrs to take the next one! May the force be with you.
  11. That's some interesting info! quick question. What exactly did you mean by "L points "? thank you again May the force be with you.
  12. Hi all, Just a thought. I've been examining the parallax method of calculating distances to stars in Parsecs for a science project, and I was wondering, any earth based observations made over the course of 6 months on either side of the earth's orbit around the sun would only be able to find distances to stars up to about 100 Parsecs (326 ly). If that is so, what if you made the observation from a planet that is farther away from the sun thus having a bigger orbit (eg: Mars) ? would that increase the limit of distance measurable for a star? which way is better from Earth or from a locati
  13. That was literally how i started astrophotography. later upgraded from my hands and a smartphone to a DSLR and telescope adaptor. awesome pic of the moon you got there too! well done May the Force be with you.
  14. Awesome! welcome to the weird, wacky and amazing world of Astronomy! happy stargazing!!! May the Force be with you.
  15. Awesome capture! very well done! I also managed to snag a pic of the Milky Way and the Southern Cross in full view using a Nikon D3500, with ISO-12800 with a 10 sec shot using f/3.5 18 mm aperture. I did the shoot in freezing temperatures (about 4 Celsius) and my fingers were about to fall off! but it was worth it May the Force be With you.
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