Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

jstrandberg

New Members
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

About jstrandberg

  • Rank
    Vacuum

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astrophotography, antique firearms, military history
  • Location
    Prescott,AZ

Contact Methods

  • Yahoo
    jstrandberg@yahoo.com
  1. Great looking image! I would be proud of that result if I had achieved it. Was this with your SW80ED?
  2. As an astrophotographer on a budget myself, I can say that I would go with a refractor. If you can get the equipment you mention within your budget ( I could not get that gear here in the US for under 1,900) I think your Skywatcher EQ35 and the SharpStar 80 will be a nice foundation for learning the hobby. From my experience I would forgo the flattener and CLP filter and invest in a good finderscope first. Once you are producing good images and have a good handle on processing, you can add the flattener and CLP filter. Good luck and have fun, but be patient as there will be a lot more failures and successes during your first few months of learning.
  3. I have calibrated my polar scope to the axis of my mount and set the RA dial based on the Polaris transit at my location in Arizona. All that I have left to do is set the Longitude offset of 7 W onto the date. Below is a photo of my mount as it sits ready to apply the offset. My question is: do I leave the date circle where it is and move the white index marker to the right to line up with 7 West on the offset, or do I leave the index mark lined up with the Zero and move the date circle left to line up with the index marker. I would appreciate any help I can get.
  4. From the looks of it, without a telescope to magnify the image, I don't see how the image would be precise enough in the camera's view screen to be useful.
  5. Howdy everyone! I recently returned to astronomy after several decades away. I hope to be doing wide-field astrophotography using my Canon T3i and an assortment of lenses. As a platform for the camera I chose the EXOS-2GT mount. The mount arrived last week. My first experiments taking 45-second subs of Orion with my Rokinon f1.4 35mm lens, using just the motor drive after doing a rough polar alignment, were very encouraging. In searching the internet for information on using the Bresser polar alignment scope, so I could get a more precise polar alignment, I happened upon Astro-baby's web sight and found some very detailed and easy to follow instructions -- and a link to this forum! I have aligned the scope with the axis of the mount and am ready to do a polar alignment, once the clouds clear up. My question is this; there seem to be two methods of achieving a good polar alignment, Astro-baby's , which is the same as Bresser's explanation (although much easier to follow) and the Kochab alignment method. So, what are the advantages of either method and why would you use one over the other? I look forward to reading your responses.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.