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Stargazer McCabe

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Everything posted by Stargazer McCabe

  1. It was visible in other photographs on the web taken as far back as 2015 I believe... http://www.astronomersdoitinthedark.com/index.php?c=149&p=565
  2. Can't get closer to a 10" Dob's performance than this... (I have no affiliation or contact with the seller...) https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sumerian-Optics-Alkaid-10-254-mm-f-5-Dobsonian-Travel-Telescope/302982151837
  3. @Ray02 Welcome back... I'd suggest you spend some time in the Getting started with Observing Section of the forum. It will probably answer an enormous number of the questions you have. https://stargazerslounge.com/forum/185-getting-started-with-observing/ Such as:
  4. See those as aspects to make it all the sweeter when you do find it
  5. Thanks Chris, just saw your post and caught it on the link you shared.
  6. SkySafari was pretty accurate the other evening. My wife and I found it in 16x70 and 25x100 binoculars on Friday night. But it was towards the haze of the horizon as others have said. It's a pretty easy star hop from Tau 1 Eri or Azha... Good luck with finding it.
  7. @Alan White Alan - As you can see from my "Kit List" I have a Dob and 2 Alt/Az Mounts with Encoders. I also have both derivatives of Serge's Nexus system. A DSC and a Nexus II. All work with SkySafari. If you ever wanted to see them in action, daytime or night time, just holler... Silent easy "Push To" when required (so long as one can see 2 stars to align on). But manual finding is equally possible if one wishes to indulge one's inner Caveman...
  8. If you Enter Vixen 2.1 into the search bar there are quite a few threads that pop up with user comments...
  9. @JG777 Sorry to hear that John. That’s most unusual for Serge... Yell if you want any photos of the AYO II with the Digi bracket on it...
  10. That’s actually one of Serge’s shelves John. But I’m sure you were aware. I have 3 versions that fit to my Dob, my AYO II and my Vamo Traveller... It can be adapted to most applications by Serge or Beat i’m sure. I specifically asked Beat to fit the AYO Digi “Nexus / Argo Navis” shelf to my AYO II. Perhaps an aftermarket fix could be possible with Beat’s and Serge’s shelves...
  11. I quite agree. In the merest breeze mine was as shaky as my Labrador in the Vet’s waiting room ... Good luck with the project @kbrown ?? Be interesting to see how you get on...
  12. In a straight comparison between just those two variants of 20x80mm binoculars, I'd go Helios on the basis of engineering quality and performance...
  13. @Louis D Let me see if I can describe coherently to be of use. Takahashi FC100DF being used with 1.25” Baader T2 Prism. Moon at 88%. On scanning the terminator the bulk of the bright moon was situated on the left of the eyepiece view. On the opposite side was what appeared to be an unfocused, “cloudy” light “patch” along the edge of the eyepiece. It wasn’t a ghost image and it was only visible with the eye to the eyepiece. It could be “avoided” by moving one’s eye placement But in doing so, one was reducing the observable FoV, to the point a Ortho would have yielded wider !! This was with the 4.7mm. With the 6.7mm there was no sign whatsoever. I’m led to believe the wide FoV of the eyepiece, allied to its numerous elements and a stern test with a bright target on one side of the eyepiece led to the “reflection”. To avoid it, I am reliably told, one should use narrower eyepieces with fewer elements... I’d be interested to hear what someone with your experience and critical eye can replicate Louis...
  14. @alan potts From other discussions held, I think I’m forming the conclusion that putting a bright target like the moon at one edge of an eyepiece is one of the sternest tests. And with as wide a view as the 82* and with as many elements in the eyepiece, reflections are almost guaranteed at that magnification... Apparently, even more expensive 82* eyepieces than the ES would struggle with that test according to those that have used them in similar circumstances... That’s why high power lunar and planetary eyepieces are of completely different construction Alan
  15. @alan potts I agree that’s why I was looking for alternative reasons or insight as to whether ES changed anything else other than the gas...?
  16. Once again Steve G at @FLO nails it... I wrote posing the same question to Team Flo this morning and, as per usual, had a helpful and informed response within 30 minutes...
  17. Mark, that’s exactly how we’ve used it in the main thus far... I’ll see whether Susie would put up with the 8.8mm and a Barlow. If not, and nobody has a fix, I’ll see if a modern variant does similar. I like a puzzle ??
  18. Not a problem at all Mark. It’s just an unusual occurrence given i’ve not encountered anything similar with the rest of them. I couldn’t even replicate using the 8.8mm and a 2x Barlow. On all other targets it works wonderfully. It’s obviously just the bright and big moon that tests it... Susie particularly likes the eyepiece in her Takahashi. I’ll think about ordering her a new one to see if the problem occurs in the more modern ones...
  19. @Ricochet Interesting. Thank you. Have you been able to find a way around your encountering of it that I might adapt ?
  20. @Mark at Beaufort Mark I saw you were perusing this earlier this evening. Did you ever encounter anything similar with the eyepiece ?
  21. I have some of the other opticstar eyepieces (Orthos) and they are exceptional... Opticstar can be trusted. They aren’t substandard “clones”...
  22. A little while ago I purchased a “previously cherished” ES82* 4.7mm from @Mark at Beaufort. Being Nitrogen purged, it is an earlier variant than all the other 82* eyepieces we have which are Argon purged. It was passed on in excellent condition and has done well on the deep sky and planetary observing done to date. Recently, I’ve used the eyepiece for the first time on lunar viewing with our Takahashi. It’s actually a nice magnification and FoV with this set up. However, when switching from the 6.7mm to the 4.7mm (or even our 3-6 Nagler zoom) a reflection has been noticeable on the right hand side of the eyepiece (with the moon placed at the left hand side of the eyepiece). Given this is the only eyepiece that both my wife and I notice this in, it has provoked a few questions: 1) Is this a trait of this particular eyepiece or might we have an odd one out 2) I know it’s nothing to do with the gas, but did ES improve any internal blackening with the newer variants if this is something common to other 4.7mm Nitrogen variants ? Would a newer 4.7mm show similar ? 3) Is there any blackening or modifications I might be able to make to the eyepiece we have ? If so, might someone more familiar with this direct me towards an idiot’s guide please ? 4) Could it be nothing to do with the eyepiece construction as such, and actually be a factor of exit pupil and reflection from the surface of our eyes ? (If so, out of curiosity, could someone explain why we might see it in the 4.7mm and not in the zoom when set at 5 or 4mm please?) Thanks in advance
  23. Two things: 1) These may save you a few shillings. I believe they are the same, or very nearly the same as the ES82* range. If anything differs it might be something like coatings perhaps. But do have a look. http://www.opticstar.com/Run/Astronomy/Astro-Accessories-Telescopes-Opticstar.asp?p=0_10_5_1_8_322 2) You'll be on the cusp of where Coma might start to be noticeable to you (depending on how critical you are). I have a 4.7 Dob and a ES82* 30mm. Some nights I don't use the Coma Corrector and some I do. On the nights I do I can reduce the coma towards the edge of the FoV. On the nights I don't the views are still mighty fine with a little more coma visible, but it certainly doesn't spoil my enjoyment. @Littleguy80 raised the same question a while back and I'd tell you what I told him; buy the eyepiece, enjoy it, if the coma is an obvious intrusion, get a coma corrector. If it doesn't bother you, happy days...
  24. Thanks @alexwolf I guess it's a classic case of "if all else fails, read the manual !!" ?
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