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Bikeman55

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About Bikeman55

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  1. Excellent, thank you guys very much for your response. Weight will probably be something for me to keep in mind and something I didn't think about although that barlow above intrigues me. Thanks again, much appreciated.
  2. I am getting into visual observing and am planning an eyepiece kit for my soon to arrive dobsonian. My question is, is there a distance the eyepiece needs to be from the glass of a barlow? I am wondering if I get a 2" barlow and want to use a 1.25" eyepiece in it, will using the required 2" to 1.25" adapter for the eyepiece, space the eyepiece too far back for it to function properly or will there be negative affects like vignetting, aberrations or inability to focus? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
  3. Thank you all for the responses. Seems as though there are several different opinions on where the backfocus should be measured from. I did end up talking with Explore Scientific about it and they told me the same thing as Fredmt in that it is technically measured from the glass but they said point B from the pictures. I am currently waiting on a variable spacer to come in where I can do some star tests and figure it out once and for all then get a more permanent spacer afterwards. And thank you Waldemar for that diagram. That is fantastic and very helpful. I will definitely be ref
  4. I posted this in another section but perhaps it better belongs here. The title pretty much says it all... Where do I go about measuring the 55mm of back-focus on the Explore Scientific 3" field flattener/reducer. I have attached a couple pictures for reference so we can refer to the same locations. I thought from the research that I have done I should measure from point A but after last night's first use it seems as though I got something wrong and I wanted to make sure I was measuring from the correct spot before I really start to scrutinize my spacing to sub-millimeter o
  5. The title pretty much says it all. Where do I go about measuring the 55mm of back-focus on the Explore Scientific 3" field flattener/reducer. I have attached a couple pictures for reference so we can refer to the same locations. I thought from the research that I have done I should measure from point A but after last night's first use it seems as though I got something wrong and I wanted to make sure I was measuring from the correct spot before I really start to scrutinize my spacing to sub-millimeter or perhaps my imaging train is not quite "plumb". Any insight would be gr
  6. Hello, I have been imaging for a while now and all the while have been using compression fittings to attach my camera to my telescope. My telescope is an ES ED127 with a 2.5" hex focuser and my camera is an ASI183MM. I am trying to find an adapter that will allow me to screw the camera directly onto the focuser tube. I was curious if anybody out there has a similar setup and how they connect their camera to their focuser tube. My focuser tube threads are m68x.75 and the threads on the camera are m42x.75. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  7. I would agree, looks like a satellite to me too.
  8. Quick and dirty answer. If you look through your polar scope while rotating your RA axis the reticle will turn with it.
  9. Hi, I have been doing astrophotography for a year or so now and am looking to upgrade to an explore scientific 102mm f/7 FCD100 triplet refractor, which has a 2.5" hexagonal focuser. Initially I will be using my trusty Nikon D5100 but hope to get a dedicated monochrome camera with filter wheel within a year or so. I would like a field flattener that for one works with this scope, two, is not a reducer, and three, would work for my Nikon now and with the dedicated camera later. I was looking at the Stellarvue field flattener for f/7 telescopes and 2.5" focusers and was wondering
  10. Not sure if you've heard of the program stellarium but I find it to be a great tool to see what is in the sky. With the built in optics plug-in you can input your telescope specs and camera sensor specs and it will show you your field of view relative to the object you want to image. I would highly recommend playing around with that, enter your location and see what is around that might interest you. Cheers
  11. Thank you all for the responses. Thank you for this number, I was measuring with the set of calipers that I have but was not accounting for the screen in front of the sensor so my measurement was probably off. I remeasured as you suggested and of course I am left slapping myself in the forehead. I was definitely including the bayonet lugs with that measurement. So the correct measurement is 8.3mm. Using the sensor to flange distance of 46.5 that puts me at 54.8. Pretty near perfect. Since my spacing is correct I move on to my other issue that is probably collimation
  12. I am having a problem with the correct spacing for my coma corrector. I have a Baader 2" Mark III MPCC and a Nikon D5100. The specs for the coma corrector recommend 55mm of back focus from the T2 mounting surface. From the face plate of my D5100 to my sensor is 44.5mm. The T-ring I am using to connect my CC to my camera is 13.3mm putting me at a backfocus distance of 57.8, much farther than recommended and over their +/- 1mm. The difference can definitely be noticed in photos, my scope is an 8" Orion astrograph, f/4. I was wondering if anybody has any experience with this or suggestions
  13. The posted image is cropped slightly then made smaller for uploading on to the site so anybody looking at it could load it quickly. The original image is 4928x3264 pixels. I will check more on my collimation and as for guiding I am researching as we speak to see what I can do to improve and try again, possibly Friday night, weather permitting. Thanks again!!
  14. Thanks all for the great advice. I'll try to respond to all your questions but it looks like I'll be spending some time with my tracking next time I'm able to get out. I did take an equal amount of darks/flats/Bias for this photo and stacked with DSS but with only 8 frames it's still pretty noisy. Yes I am guiding and I am using a Skywatcher EQ6 mount. My subs were 4min. Can't seem to get much longer than that with my light pollution. A filter might help in that regard but I haven't gotten there yet. Thanks again for the responses. I will work on my g
  15. I have an Orion 8" f/3.9 newtonian astrograph. I am relatively new to imaging but am giving it my best shot. I have been struggling with abberation since day one and have become quite discouraged. I realize especially with fast newtonians that comatic abberation is to be expected. I am using a Baader Planetarium Mark III coma corrector and collimation, to the very best of my knowledge, is pretty dead on. I also use a bahtinov mask for focusing so focus should also be pretty dead on. Below I have attached a recent photo I have taken as an example, very minimally processed. I am using an un
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