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storebror

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About storebror

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    Star Forming

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    storebror2

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  • Location
    Aylesbury, Bucks
  1. Just to point out that McAfee site Advisor is not an anti virus program; it's simply a browser plug in that alerts you to POTENTIALLY malicious websites based on user experiences. It can be a little 'over enthusiastic', and certainly the warning over the Stellarium site can be safely ignored.
  2. I would agree that you'd be much better of with a decent pair of binoculars, rather than trying to buy a telescope within your price range that would only cause disappointment and possibly lead you to give up. A telescope can come later when you have a bigger budget. I was lucky enough to get a pair of the 10X50 binos from Lidl a couple of years back. I was staggered when I looked at the Pleiades star cluster with them - a truly magnificent sight. For their price, these binos are really good and not too heavy (something you need to consider with binoculars becuae the heavier they are the more difficult they are to keep steady and then you start needing a tripod).
  3. I'm really glad you posted this Anthony because the replies and the photos have been really helpful - I only collimated my last scope twice and hated doing it - I was never really sure I'd got it quite right. I have yet to collimate my Skywatcher 150!
  4. I would echo this about not getting discouraged - I've just seen Mars for the very first time this evening and it is VERY small - but I was pleased just to have seen it.
  5. Yes it does rather look as though it deliberately decides to change direction and cover us, doesn't it! Can't say I've noticed anything down here in Bucks yet - no doubt it has still to make its way here.
  6. For purchasing you can't do better than our own Steve at First Light Optics - first class service - just click the banner at the top of the forum.
  7. Before I bought my Skywatcher 150p, I had it's smaller brother and I had no problem viewing Saturn with it - and believe me, the first time you see it, you will never forget it.
  8. I've been running Stellarium on my laptop and vista (now using it with Windows 7) with no problems. Is it possible that it's just a corrupted installation? Have you tried uninstalling it and reinstalling it? The other possibility is to turn off 3D acceleration on your graphics card to see if that helps. If it does, stellarium won't look as pretty, but at least you'll have tracked down the problem.
  9. I lost my father, grandmother and aunt to this terrible disease and my thoughts are with you - I think this is a magnificent gesture on your part.
  10. Yes it's odd the effect Saturn has. I had my first view of it last Summer and got so excited I wanted to go and wake the neighbours up to show them (I managed to restrain myself!!) I agree, it's a sight that's never forgotten and I'm looking forward to my next view of it soon.
  11. Here is quite a good video on collimation and how to carry it out when it's necessary: http://www.andysshotglass.com/Collimating.html
  12. Absolutely NOT true - I've just bought a Skywatcher 150P from FLO - £190 - (before the price hike). Before it was stolen, I had a Skywatcher 130PM which, at the time, cost me about £145, again from FLO. Price is not always a good guide to the quality of a telescope - and this is where some research, reading reviews and reading what people say on forums such as this is so valuable.
  13. My first bit of advice - be VERY careful with telescopes from eBay - you will no doubts have seen 'bargains' on such makes as Seben - steer clear of them - their optics are vastly inferior compared to well known makes such as Celstron, Meade, Skywatcher, Tal etc. Don't get suckered into those 'scopes that claim 'X magnification' - it's aperture that's important, not magnification; the bigger the aperture, the more you'll see. Also, what type of telescope you eventually buy will, to a large extent, depend on where your interests lie. I'm certainly no expert, but if it's planets you're mainly interested in, then a refractor would be a good choice. If it's deep sky objects, then probably a reflector would be better. If you eventually want to get into astrophotography, then you'll need an equatorial mount, rather than Alt-Azimuth so that the scope can track objects in the sky as the earth moves. It's not an easy decision and you'll no doubt get plenty more opinions on what would be best. Actually, I'd say go for a good pair of binoculars first but I guess that's a personal decision. Good luck.
  14. Yes I've just upgraded to a Skywatcher 150 from a 130 and feel like I'm learning to use an EQ all over again - just been out and almost ended up on my knees underneath the dam thing - can't imagine what the neighbours would think if they could see me in such weird positions
  15. Having owned a Skywatcher 130 myself, I can tell you that it it won't fit in a duffel bag - the tube on it's own is about 70cm long and then there's the tripod and mount to consider - if I remember correctly, the total weight of the whole thing is about 18kg. Mind you, I don'tthink you'll regret your purchase - they're great telescopes.
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