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Shibby

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Everything posted by Shibby

  1. I've seen the Flame through my 150P. It was quite challenging, though.
  2. Yet you don't see professional musicians using speakers with 10m diameters..!
  3. I think he's just questioning why the green filter doesn't seem to cover the O-III wavelength.
  4. That's very nice. Any details? Is it a composite? So many busy bodies! I'd be a bit annoyed, but I suppose it's good that people look out for dodgy happenings...
  5. PHD should run happily alongside EQMod. Have you added the guide scope focal length details etc to PHD settings? That tells it how far the star should move. If not, it may not "move enough" to calibrate properly. I'm sure the guide on Billy's site will cover all this, though.
  6. Sorry, I may have missed the actual point of your post. I just looked at the Baader graphs and it looks to me like the G filter does pass all of the O-III. It's a bit difficult to tell on the Astronomik chart to be honest - the green line is a bit too thick to see clearly what's happening at 500nm!
  7. As you've noticed, OIII should be turquoise and sit right between green and blue. I think, in reality, there's probably also some reflection nebulosity going on. This tends to be blue in colour due to young stars being the hottest & brightest, so perhaps there is some of this contributing to your blue channel?
  8. It sounds like a light-pollution filter would be your best bet. The Astronomik EOS clip filter is pretty well regarded, but a bit over your budget. There's the "SkyTech" filter (here) but I wouldn't know how good it is.
  9. Very impressive capture. Can't help but appreciate something you never see! It *has* to be called the 8-ball nebula; this is exactly what I thought of too when first seeing your image! Is there any other way for us astronomers to work?
  10. What a superb image. Excellent composition, too.
  11. Nice job! You've done well to control the bright stars. The pink colour comes from using Ha as luminance. I normally add a little to luminance then also blend it in as a red layer.
  12. Well, I only went and got my filters mixed up again. The result is, I'm going to have some excellent Red data...
  13. I haven't done it, but you can always stack the filters. I don't know whether this would lead to reflection issues, though!
  14. I know it was just my attempt at a joke! ( I'll get my coat )
  15. Well, although familiar with Nth notation, I had no idea what an Ent was! Astronomers say the universe is finite, which is a comforting thought for those people who can’t remember where they leave things.
  16. So difficult to decide what to put in my (5 position) filter wheel!
  17. Really nice - so rich and colourful!
  18. Nice image, interesting target! Some details, though?
  19. Much the same across the UK tonight - make the most of it folks! What are you planning?
  20. Ooh, not seen that one before - you say it works well, does it cope OK with dew?
  21. Really? I recently imaged for a whole night without ticking "autosave" I also recently imaged most of the night through the wrong filter - a photometry one, so the data was useless! This was all user error. So far, the automation in my obsy has been okay. I'm happy the cables don't snag and I can re-point remotely without anything going wrong. An autofocuser would be nice, so I could change filters remotely or schedule those filter changes. I still cannot sleep for long while it's running, though. I think I need a reliable rain sensor with loud alarm before I can comfortably get a proper sleep!
  22. Since somebody else bumped this I just thought I'd add that ventilation is fine for keeping your observatory dry when closed up, but after a full night of open-roof dew collection, I find it's an absolute must to run the dehumidifier in the scope side for a while after closing up. But since I only have one dehumidifier, I can never decide whether to leave the warm room door open or not; I'd like to ensure there's no damp in there either, but probably shouldn't add warm air to the scope side?
  23. To me, the issues on the left-hand side of the image look like field rotation. This can happen if the polar alignment isn't too good and you're guiding on something near the RHS of the frame. There might be a very slight amount of coma showing in the other corners, so it might be worth double-checking your spacing (usually, though, the T-adapter is designed to achieve correct spacing). The double spikes are normally caused by the secondary supports not being perfectly aligned, but could also be due to other obstructions.
  24. Shibby

    M 51

    Superb depth and detail - very nice!
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