Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_31.thumb.jpg.b7a41d6a0fa4e315f57ea3e240acf140.jpg

Moon Watcher

Members
  • Content Count

    18
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

11 Good

About Moon Watcher

  • Rank
    Nebula

Profile Information

  • Location
    USA

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Bloody hilarious. Have 2 boys who were once told “hey! No light sabres by the telescope!” by their mum. In all seriousness, a random smacking of the keyboard will bring up more ‘dangerous’ material than this on a browser for the kids to try and emulate.
  2. Hello Mariosi! I have always enjoyed your sketches; they are exactly as I see the objects. I have been observing Venus and trying to convince myself that I can see cloud details through my 130mm f/7 triplet. Have you sketched Venus? Please keep posting and stay safe!
  3. I use that unit on my Orion Az/Eq6 in Alt/Az mode. The mount holds a C11 and 130mm f7 triplet. Both have a 2” diagonal and eyepiece. The battery powers the mount for around 5-6 hours without problems.
  4. It’s a really great scope! Works well for wide field views of the Veil as well as close ups of Jupiter’s bands...
  5. Very nice report mate! In the US, where I live at the moment (Wisconsin) the skies have just been dreadful. Did you have to recollimate the lens cell once you removed and then replaced it?
  6. Hey all, If you're looking for a great 80mm triplet, I would go with the Orion ED80cf (http://www.telescope.com/mobileProduct/Telescopes/Refractor-Telescopes/Refractor-Optical-Tube-Assemblies/Orion-ED80T-CF-Triplet-Apochromatic-Refractor-Telescope/pc/1/c/10/sc/346/101422.uts) The optical quality is astounding and there's a great review of it here: http://arksky.org/smf/index.php?topic=1930.0
  7. Hello Sunshine, the tuner should have some grease on it to make an air-tight seal. Only then will you be able to pressure tune your view. There should be a reasonable amount of resistance as you tune and the view should change from a detail-less red ball through to surface detail and then prominences and flares. Good luck!
  8. Hello Skipper Billy, I own one of these and like it a lot. I wrote a brief review of it last October: It's wide, beautiful, flat fields are amazing.
  9. Hello Cardigan Wearer - congrats on your new setup! I have wondered how well the AVX works with a C11 at higher power. What's the damp down time and is it all jitters while focusing? Or does the mount hold up ok? Congrats again!
  10. Hey Jonathan, thats great! Once collimated the scope is pretty amazing. You'll enjoy the views! cheers Avtar aka Moonwatcher
  11. Hey Jonathan, To move the secondary away from the primary, loosen the center bolt and then turn the 3 thumb screws clockwise. This should pull the secondary up the tube. Once you have it centered in the cheshire or collimation cap, tighten the main bolt down. The issue is that when the center bolt touches the secondary housing as you tighten, it slightly rotates the secondary clockwise. Then you have to rotate the entire secondary housing to re-center by loosening the assembly on the corrector plate. It sounds scarier than it is. I ended up disassembling the entire corrector plate
  12. Hey Chris and John, The ES Mak-Newt is pretty amazing - especially for the price. I compared it directly with my Teleskop-Systems Photoline 130mm f7 triplet which by itself is a beautiful scope. The triplet gives crystal sharp views with no false colour after equilibration and its views of Jupiter with ever finer and finer bands and festoons is just something to behold. However I have to say that the ES scope beats it in terms of details on planets and on deep sky objects, as you found in your comparison with the SW 120ED. I also got my neighbours to look through both to get an unbias
  13. This summer I organized a star gazing event at a location with virtually no light pollution on an island in Lake Michigan where 25-30 people turned up. The sky was just incredible with the Milky Way brightly painted across the summer sky. One of the scopes I used was the Explore Scientific 152mm Maksutov-Newtonian Comet Hunter. The scope pulled up objects like M57 and M13 so clearly and with such detail that people were lingering at the eyepiece commenting on how beautiful they were. I didn’t have to explain how that tiny fuzz ball was a star cluster, it was obvious that M13
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.