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Lorstin

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  • Content Count

    14
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  • Last visited

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About Lorstin

  • Rank
    Nebula

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astronomy, history, computers, photography, building & flying rockets.
  • Location
    The Antipodes

Recent Profile Visitors

490 profile views
  1. My guess - it is the little arrow under the "L" If you turn your photo upside down then the lettering on the diagram is oriented the same and the little arrow is in the same position as the dot.
  2. It's more fun building your own.
  3. Well at least you've seen it! It's summer down here and I haven't had a clear night for weeks! Pretty soon Wirtanen will be lost to the southern parts of Australia.
  4. For what it's worth, here's an edited RAW - used filters to take out the blue edges, and added a bit of "colour temperature" to make it look a bit warmer. Have to admit I'm working in the dark (pun intended) and I have little or no idea what I'm doing ? Any ideas on what I could do to improve the image would be greatly appreciated or is it destined to always be a fairly boring record of something that happened?
  5. Yes, on both counts. The event finished about 25 minutes ago. A perfect day weather wise. A good omen was observed just before the eclipse started - a pair of wedge tail eagles were seen soaring high close to the sun. Here's a quick pic ( low res & no filters ) taken at maximum.
  6. Today's the day, a thick frost and a clear blue sky, about four and a half hours to go.? > note the use of appropriate eye protection.
  7. A good idea carastro, there is enough leftover to make one, if only I can remember where I put it.
  8. Thanks everyone, to save myself some typing I didn't bother to say that I had a solar filter ( it's one I made myself from solar film ). 1/3200s gives me somewhere to start, I'll do a bit of experimenting.
  9. Hi, just found out that there is a partial solar eclipse heading my way (July 13th - a Friday! ? something will go wrong for sure ). I'm going to attempt to photograph it, I'd just like a bit of help with the settings on my camera. It's a very basic setup - I'll be using a Canon EOS1300D mounted on a 4" Saxon refractor. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
  10. Hello everyone, here is my first attempt at shooting the moon. Taken on 31-01-18 near Melbourne Aust using a Canon EOS1300D attached to an old Saxon 100x400 refractor. I was quite surprised to see a few stars had also been captured. The only editing done was to use a blue filter to get rid of some chromatic abberation.
  11. Thanks for the advice CJD, if I'd have thought quicker I would've taken a pic of the mirror, it's been living in a not too friendly enviroment for several years. Regarding the lint - I used two brands of tissues when cleaning the mirror, for the initial clean I used an el cheapo (which was fine) and then finished off with a more expensive one - this was the culprit that left all the lint behind. I used another el cheapo and removed the lint. I think "the boss" has some of those micro fibre cloths you mentioned, I'll pinch one when she's not looking.
  12. Thanks John, I can now go & put it back together. The mirror certainly needed cleaning, unfortunately the second tissue I used left alot of lint behind, ah well these things happen.
  13. I have just removed the primary mirror cell ( 12" Sky Watcher collapsible dob) for cleaning and noticed that the screws that secure the three brackets/clips that hold the mirror to the cell are slightly loose. Are these screws supposed to be loose? maybe to allow for expasion/contraction of the mirror? or was it just poorly assembled? If I could get an answer before I put the cell back in that would be great. P.S I followed the instructions elsewhere on this forum to remove the cell, I did it in the verticle position and the tube lifted off easily, it couldn't have been easier.Thanks.
  14. I first became interested in watching the sky when my dad took me for a walk one night (not far from Leicester) to watch Sputnik II go over. Now I live on the other side of the planet and still enjoy watching the sky. Fortunately it's a dark sky site, although trees limit my view. I have a 4" refractor with equitorial mount and a 12" collapsible dob, several binocs and the little hand held scope dad bought me when I was 8yo. T.T.F.N.
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