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Filroden

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About Filroden

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  • Birthday August 26

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  1. You may want to search Astrobin or other image sites for examples of the results. I know the huge increase in field of view is appealing. That much light gathering over a wide area...
  2. It keeps looking. Whether clouds, trees, neighbours houses, etc, it will eventually find its way past them. You can speed things up in two ways: you can manually point it to three areas and you can save these as configurations, helping you avoid houses and trees which aren't going to move.
  3. The StarSense handset has completely new software built in compared to the Nexstar+ handset it replaced so its behaviour may be different. I suspect home is where it finds itself when you boot up or start the alignment from. If I remember right, when you do the initial align it asks you to move the scope's position to "home". For an alt/az mount that just means make sure the scope if level, i.e. 0 in alt. I could start in any az position though I tended to always set up the same way so it was always roughly pointing E (so the cords were W). The mount does not know which way it is pointing before alignment. For cord wrap, this is irrelevant, as it only needs to know what way it was pointing relative to the start position. So 0 for cordwrap could be E or W or any other direction. It just means it will never move past 180 degrees from that position. At least that's the simplest programmatic way to avoid wrapping that I can think of. I've never tested it.
  4. I assume it works like a meridian flip. The mount will not pass through the point 180 degrees opposite the home position. So if the scope is +179 and needs to go to -179 it will not take the short route (only 2 degrees away) but go the long way. That way the cord cannot wrap.
  5. I was think it needed to be disabled. You just have to be careful to keep an eye on your cables. The only other thing I can think would cause it is if the handset was in EQ mode (I.e. It thinks it's mounted on a wedge) as it avoids crossing the southern meridian. But I don't think it's this as I don't think you'd get your goto alignment.
  6. Whilst it's great for solving imaging, it doesn't give you any control over the annotation (at least that I've found). PixInsight allows you to choose what to annotate (stars, constellations, galaxies, etc) and to fine tune it (magnitude limits, colour, font size, etc). It therefore is better for annotating the less well known galaxies. astrometry.net PixInisght (showing galaxies only though I suspect it may have solved some noise!)
  7. I think you've missed a few or a few dozen! I can see many more after just a quick glance. If you are still trialling PixInsight then it's got a couple of good scripts to solve and annotate images. That should nail all of them!
  8. 1. That sounds odd. Do you have cord wrap switched on? If so, that will prevent it going 360 and might mean it goes the long way around. 2. This was a huge problem for me too. So instead of using auto align I would do a manual align (choosing roughly the same three areas it would under auto) and reduce the motor speed. It took a couple of minutes longer but it was quieter. 3. Once aligned you can use the manual move arrows to get close at a lower motor speed then do the goto command. It should then do the final move quite quickly. What you cannot do is move the clutches manually as that breaks the alignment.
  9. Item for sale: Celestron Evolution mount and tripod This sale only includes the following: - Heavy duty stainless steel tripod that Celestron normally use on its CPC series telescopes (this is a heavier tripod than is sold with the 6” and 8” Evolution models, including the mount only option currently available from FLO) - Tripod accessory tray - Alt/azimuth mount with built in lithium battery and wifi - UK Power adaptor - Nexstar+ handset (not needed if you use the wifi and a compatible app) Note: this sale does not include a scope. I am keeping the original SCT scope that is normally sold with this mount. Price: £750 Payment: cleared funds via bank transfer prior to collection or delivery Delivery: collection in East Cleveland or I could deliver within about a 200 mile radius of Middlesbrough for £15 per 100 miles travelled (so £60 for a 200 mile round trip) so long as it’s not a really difficult journeyReason for sale: I purchased this mount in December 2015 from FLO as my first step back into astronomy. I have recently upgraded my mount to a Celestron AVX so I no longer need the Evolution mount. Performance: I’ve loved this mount. It’s very simple to set up, align and use. As an alt/azimuth mount it is better suited for observation and imaging the solar system but I was able to take reasonable DSO images using both a DSLR, and more recently, a cooled CMOS mono sensor. I would usually take exposures of 30-60 seconds with a 400mm focal length scope but I could take longer if pointing away from the meridian. Condition: Full working order and updated to the latest firmware (mount and handset) as off approx. December 2016. Usual signs of use for a year but any marks are cosmetic. Still within manufacturers 2 year warranty (until 1 December 2017). Images: Example DSO images taken using the mount: 1) Rosette Nebula using a Skywatcher Esprit 80 and ZWO ASI 1600MM-C 2) Andromeda Galaxy using a Skywatcher Esprit 80 and Canon 60D Description from the Celestron site (references to the scope have been removed): "THIS ROBOTIC WIFI TELESCOPE IS THE COOLEST APP-CESSORY IN THE GALAXY" -WIRED.COM "5-STAR OVERALL RATING" -BBC SKY AT NIGHT MAGAZINE Leave your hand control behind and slew to all the best celestial objects with a tap of your smartphone or tablet. Connect your device to NexStar Evolution’s built-in wireless network, and explore the universe with the Celestron mobile app for iOS and Android. Use the planetarium interface to view the night sky in real time or display a list of celestial objects currently visible based on your time and location. Our proprietary SkyAlign alignment procedure is built right into the Celestron mobile app, so you’re ready to observe within minutes. THE MOST USER-FRIENDLY TELESCOPE EVER Celestron engineers designed NexStar Evolution based on years of customer feedback. It offers many thoughtful design features that combine to provide you the best possible experience out under the stars. Forget about batteries or an external power supply. For the first time ever on a consumer telescope, NexStar Evolution includes its own built-in battery. With this ultra-long life lithium-iron phosphate battery, you’ll be able to enjoy stargazing marathons up to 10 hours on a single charge. You can even use NexStar Evolution’s USB charge port to top off the other devices in your life that need to stay powered on during an observing session. An intelligent power management system senses when battery levels are low and goes into power-saving mode to keep your telescope running for as long as possible. Setting up your NexStar Evolution is quick and painless with large, ergonomic handles. The same heavy-duty stainless steel tripod we use on our CPC series telescopes anchors your 9.25" telescope, providing serious stability. Manual clutches in both altitude and azimuth offer greater flexibility to manually point the telescope when powered off. Store up to 7 eyepieces in 2 accessory trays, one with an adjustable red LED illuminator. SUPERIOR TRACKING FIT FOR ASTROIMAGING If you’re interested in astroimaging, the NexStar Evolution is an excellent, affordable way to get started. It’s the only fork-mounted telescope in its price range that offers brass worm gears, along with improved motors. NexStar Evolution’s tracking accuracy is so impressive, you can capture images of deep-sky objects like the Orion Nebula by simply attaching your DSLR camera. As you progress in the hobby of astroimaging, you can add our Pro HD Wedge to achieve longer exposures for more detailed astrophotos. NexStar Evolution is equipped with 4 auxiliary ports--2 on top of the fork and 2 on the bottom. A classic NexStar+ hand control is included, but is not necessary when using NexStar Evolution with the mobile app.
  10. Again, can I just confirm: if your scope is pointing to the left of the meridian when you select the star in the menu and the star is to the right of the meridian, it is correct that the scope will move in the "wrong" direction. It will move the long way around the circle because the software is designed never to slew the scope across the southern meridian. If the telescope is pointing on the opposite side of the merdian as the star (like the first diagram) then it will slew the longest way around the circle. If your scope is pointing on the same side of the merdian as the star (like the second diagram), it will slew the shortest way around the circle. So my question: when the scope started to slew the "wrong" way, did you stop it before it finished slewing? Or did it complete its slew but was pointing in the wrong direction?
  11. My Skywatcher flattener comes in two pieces. The optical element which has a nice grip to it and an 11mm extension which is smooth. This takes the 62mm thread down to a 48mm thread. For me, I have to measure from the reducer element without the extension. Your image looks like it could be similar. If so, I would measure from A. If it is a single unit then you are in luck and it is from B
  12. If it is a Celestron handset then go to the location option in the menu. It will ask you for country then city. Ignore this. Press the button with the Celestron logo. It will change it to asking for specific latitude and longitude.
  13. I posted on your other topic but here it is again: I can't understand if your issue is: 1) the scope slews to Betelgeuse but takes the long way around? 2) the scope slews to the wrong position? If it is (1) then it could be correct. Equatorial goto mounts will not slew across the meridian on its south side (the imaginary line passing north-south through the celestial pole and the zenith). If your scope is pointing one side of the meridian, even by only a degree, and you ask it slew using a goto command to the other side, it will go the long way around. It does this to always keep the counterweight below the scope. Many mounts can physically move past the meridian and will track past the meridian. However, they will not slew using goto past the meridian. They will go the long way from East through North around to the West. If it is (2) then it could be a number of issues such as date/time/location settings. Is the date in the correct format - month day year. Is the time adjusted for summer time? Birmingham UK and not Birmingham Alabama US? Northampton is approximately 52N 001W. 090W would put you in the middle of Canada!
  14. I can't understand if your issue is: 1) the scope slews to Betelgeuse but takes the long way around? 2) the scope slews to the wrong position? If it is (1) then it could be correct. Equatorial goto mounts will not slew across the meridian on its south side (the imaginary line passing north-south through the celestial pole and the zenith). If your scope is pointing one side of the meridian, even by only a degree, and you ask it slew using a goto command to the other side, it will go the long way around. It does this to always keep the counterweight below the scope. Many mounts can physically move past the meridian and will track past the meridian. However, they will not slew using goto past the meridian. They will go the long way from East through North around to the West. If it is (2) then it could be a number of issues such as date/time/location settings. Is the date in the correct format - month day year. Is the time adjusted for summer time? Birmingham UK and not Birmingham Alabama US?
  15. As I have StarSense I no longer use the finder. However, I remember it took me a while to align the finder with the three screws. It's best to do it in daylight on as distant an object as you can find (being careful not to point in the direction of the sun). You can use corners of roofs, aerials, etc. My Celestron scope came with a starpointer - basically just an illuminated cross hair with no magnification - which I never liked. My Skywatcher came with a much better finderscope that had two sets of rings with three screws on each, so you could adjust it at both ends. I don't know what your finderscope looks like but it should be held in two places with at least one of them being adjustable. 1. Put in a low powered eyepiece and focus on a distant object using the main scope. Swap in a higher powered eyepiece (smaller in diameter) and fine tune your object. 2. Without moving the main scope, adjust the three screws to centre that same object in the finderscope. 3. Check the main scope is still centred on the object. If not, repeat the three steps.