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Fosforus

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About Fosforus

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  1. The first detection was from coalescing black holes, yes - but how would that signal be affected by other intervening black holes, that the gravitational wave passed through or by, on it's way to our earth based detectors?
  2. Gravitational waves are said to cross the Universe without being affected by anything. Has anyone got a view on whether gravitational waves (as detected by LIGO) could be affected by Black Holes? Could this provide a method for mapping the presence and frequency of intervening Black Holes within the Universe and their passage to us?
  3. OK, after writing the above and posting, I'm sure I got it wrong. Another try.....my latest final interpretation(!) is...as far as a light particle is concerned, it gets to where it is going, no matter where it is going (even to the end of the universe) immediately...as a photon (from the external observer's world, light has a wave/particle duality) gets closer and closer to the speed of light, an external observer sees the clock of that body running slower edging towards time stopping. So, for the light particle, all is normal, but as far as the photon understands it, the external observers time has also run much slower and is edging towards zero. Both the photon's frame of reference and the observers frame of reference indicate that their own existence is normal and that the others time has slowed down to close to zero. So after one year (observer's frame of reference), the photon hits a perfect mirror and then returns to the external observer. After two years (observer's frame of reference) the observer sees the photon again. The photon says no time has passed (photon's frame of reference, because it has traveled at the speed of light, and all has been normal), the observer says two years have passed (observer's frame of reference does not allow his own "true" matter to travel exactly at the speed of light, otherwise this matter would have become infinitely heavy and have infinite energy), because he's gone round the sun twice! Time (and length) do not exist as independent invariable properties, they are "warped" in the presence of matter.
  4. Perhaps I heard the same thing? I used i-player about 10 times to repeat one of Brian Cox's comments, some years ago, because I just couldn't get it. Martin Rees & Patrick Moore were on the same program and it was clear that Patrick did not understand what Brian had said. My final interpretation was...as far as a light particle is concerned, it gets to where it is going, no matter where it is going (even to the end of the universe) immediately...as a body gets closer and closer to the speed of light, an external observer sees the clock of that body running slower edging towards time stopping. So, for the light particle, no time has passed and consequently, as far as the photon understands it, the external observers time has run much faster and is edging towards infinity. Imagine after one year, the photon hits a perfect mirror and then returns to the external observer. After two years the observer sees the photon. The photon says no time has passed, the observer says two years have passed, because he's gone round the sun twice!
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