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Stub Mandrel

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Stub Mandrel last won the day on September 27

Stub Mandrel had the most liked content!

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About Stub Mandrel

  • Rank
    Sub Giant

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  • Website URL
    http://www.neilwyattenvironmental.co.uk

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Staffordshire UK
  1. Fusion360 has a thread tool that just creates an image of a thread for modelling purposes. In most 3D programs you can create one by drawing the thread profile (a 60 degree equilateral triangle for metric thread) and rotating it to make a thread. You could try here  for tips (have to declare an interest in that web site).
  2. Not sure. Horizontal expansion (try a negative setting is useful for getting sizes spot on)
  3. I've managed T2 threads, you need a good small vertical step and make sure the thread axis is vertical. If its too tight use the Cura facility for compensating for hole size to keep everything else in proportion.
  4. Astronomers should be thankful! I edit a magazine about model engineering. Our articles are photo heavy, which can in some cases means 20-odd photos of a grey bit of metal on grey machines being worked with grey tools gradually getting smaller... fortunately most of our readers are more interested in the process in question than great artistic merit but it does cheer me up when I get submissions with really good and varied photos.
  5. I'm in competition with myself, not anyone else (aside from the light-hearted SGL competitions!) If I see better pics than I get I think how can I get there? If I see someone who is starting out, they are usually doing better than my first attempts, and if I can offer useful advice or encouragement I try to. Getting published, an APOD or AAPOD isn't about being better than other people, it's about achieving a standard, but equipment and experience can and should be taken into account as results achieved with limited gear (for example) can be particularly inspiring for beginners. I like the approach taken at most model engineering competitions, where most of the entries are judged against a standard, not against each other.
  6. There's a surprisingly huge amount of work in producing a professional magazine, even in PDF format - as I am all too aware. It's not a cheap thing to do, so you need to be assured of a sizeable paying readership, plus an assured supply of quality content well in advance of first publication.
  7. The Maginon 20-60x60 Maginon spotting scope is back in Aldi, but now £25 but with a proper tripod, albeit a bit flimsy it is usable and quite tall, and has to be with £10 on its own. I haven't been able to take a look at anything yet but it certainly seems from other reviews to be a good choice for keeping in the car for random birdwatching or even a cheeky bit of astronomy. Very light so could be hand luggage on holiday. For the price what's not to like.
  8. Virtually perfect sky here, despite what the forecast says! Anyone on the east coast of Lincolnshire should be in a for a good few hours, but barely enough time to set up here and I'm heading out anyway.
  9. I have only found this an issue with VERY bright stars like Alnitak and relatively easy to remove with a bit of judicious healing.
  10. I live in the Midlands. Easily defined as the area northerners think is the south of England and southerners think is the north...
  11. What is interesting is how pathetically weak gravity is. I can push myself away from the pull of the entire earth! A tiny magnet can lift a big lump of steel with the whole planet pulling the other way!
  12. Single frame taken about 4 minutes after contact with the ASI 120MC and £70 Lidl telescope! A little bit of denoise and tiny bit of sharpen as well as false colour.
  13. In Photoshop there's a 'healing Brush' which sometimes does a smoother job.
  14. Went over to join about ten stalwarts from the Rosliston Club, hoping to do a bit of outreach, but we only got a handful of the public. A few very brief clear spells let me focus with my ASI120MC on the Bresser (Lidl special!) Decided not to use a barlow due to tricky conditions. We missed first contact as it was clouded out for several minutes so Mercury was well on the disc by the time we first saw/imaged it. Over the next hour, lost of brief appearances. Then a small but tall tree interfered for most of us while we got about 15 minutes of clear! I got a good run of video just after this. Nearly everyone packed up in the face of thick, dark cloud and light rain, but Andy (who had a Daystar) persisted and I swapped over to my C90 Mak and DSLR and eventually skies cleared again. A few folks who had stayed in the hope of a sighting saw good views on my camera and Andy's Daystar and I got some whole-disc pictures. I packed up and spent a good while chatting interspersed with looks at the daystar including seeing my first prominence. Neither Registax nor Autostakkert wanted to stack the images, so I manually stacked the ten best scoring. Unlike 2016 I had flats, which seem to be even more critical for solar than DSOs! Added some synthetic colour:
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