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Tantalus

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Everything posted by Tantalus

  1. Heehee. I like the idea that if you were on Deimos you could launch yourself into space on a bicycle.
  2. Although I've never heard a meteor myself, I have read reports of meteors making sounds. And if you look at the wiki page on meteoroids, there's also a section on sounds made by meteors.
  3. Yeah. I was watching this one. With 20 seconds to go I placed a bid that was higher than the winning bid, but for some reason the bid didn't register...
  4. Oh B.......s, I was reading last years dates. Sorry
  5. At 01:00 GMT Sunday 25th October
  6. I found this reference to a 'Mullard Space Science Lab' in Holmbury St Mary... Holmbury St Mary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  7. Wow. I was looking at around the same time, but not from such a great dark site. I have to put up with a fair amount of LP and the colour wasn't nearly as vivid, and no sign of the tail. And being further north, at 02:00 BST the sky is already beginning to brighten. Lovely rendition...
  8. Hi Beagle, and Welcome from another Lincolnshire lad. You've certainly come to the right place. If Carling did an astro forum, it'd be SGL...
  9. 120mm F/8.3 refractor Meade5000 26mm (~40x) 10mm standard Plossl X-Cel 5mm (200x) Initially I wasn't planning on going out, so I didn't have a prepared list, but in the end I couldn't resist the allure of a clear sky. Started off with M15. At only around 25 deg altitude, it wasn't easy to find with nearby stars lost in lp, but I managed to find Enif in the finder scope, then swept upwards from there until M15 appeared as a feint fuzzy in the 26mm ep, a first-obsy for me. Tried to tease out some detail in the 5mm, but wasn't really able to do so. Tried to find M11, the curiously named Wild Duck Cluster, but working without a star chart it proved too elusive. So next I went for the Double Cluster in Perseus. This one is much easier to find, lying so close to Cassiopea. Both clusters fitted nicely into the FOV of the 26mm ep, giving me a stunning view of the clusters. Next, I couldn't resist the temptation of a quick peek at M31. Still low in the sky, it's not at it's best just yet, but the 26mm ep still managed to show quite a large feint elliptical disc around the central core. Then after several minutes of looking at M31, I detected a very feint fuzzy spot just above it. I swapped in the 5mm ep and moved it around in the ep with the motor drives just to make sure I wasn't imagining things - M110? I made a careful mental note of it's position in relation to nearby stars, and was later able to confirm with Stellarium that it was indeed M110! Another first for me, and it made my night. By now it was nearly 02:30 am, and the eastern sky was already beginning to brighten, so I went inside for a cuppa until 3am, when Jupiter would be above the rooftops. I took the chance to use Jupiter as a pointer to Uranus. In the 5mm ep I could just about make out a very small blue-ish disc. Another first, and I'm up to 6 planets, just Neptune and Pluto to go. Then Jupiter. Not much to see with it being so low and with some whispy morning cloud low in the east, but I could make out the NEB, and moons Ganymede, Io, and Callisto. The Moon was also rising, but I have to sleep some time, the Moon can wait. Three new targets though, I call that a good night.
  10. Sounds like a good night Mark. I wouldn't say "only a 4" APO frac" though, from what I've read about them they're a nice piece of kit. I know what you mean about motivation Doc - I was tired last night and didn't really want to be bothered. I knew I shouldn't miss the chance of a clear sky, so I started setting up but it felt like I was just going though the motions. Once I'd set up, I thought I may as well at least have a look even though I'd not prepared a list, and was rewarded with three first-time observations and a nice meteor... . Hope you find the magic again soon Doc.
  11. There's certainly a lot of them flying around up there. I was out this morning and at around 01:47 I saw 3 naked-eye satellites in the sky at the same time! One was revolving, pulsing every 10 seconds or so and one in the east which gave a nice flare. Like you said, not exactly big news, but they can make the night sky seem almost 'alive' at times, if you see what I mean.
  12. So far, 100% visual. IMO nothing beats beeing able to see the marvels of the universe at first hand, and with the vagaries of the British weather, time that could be spent at the eye-piece is precious. I can see the rewards to be gained from imaging, especially when I see some of the jaw-dropping images on this forum, and I have a lot of respect for those who are able to produce these images. I've even been tempted to get into imaging myself, but the added costs in both time and money is not something that I'm prepared to commit to at this point in time (though I reserve the right to change my mind at any point in the future, as the whim takes me ).
  13. Building The Biggest - The International Space Station On Quest (Freeview 38) at 21:00 tonight - gotta be better than watching the clouds drift by
  14. RVO have a wide range Astro_Baby, including the Antares... Telescope Accessories | Focusers | Rother Valley Optics Hope this helps...
  15. Thanks jgs. I've had a look at Calsky but nothing anywhere that bright at that time from my location. Unfortunatley I wasn't wearing my specs at the time, so I can't give more precise tracking info. Heyho...
  16. Was setting up just after ten pm, and as I was aligning my finderscope on Saturn, I saw a bright flare, mag -7 to -8 just SE of Alkaid in UMa, travelling from South to East, through my local zenith. I caught it just at it's peak, then it quickly faded. Time at the end of it's flare was 22h 20m 20s (BST). It's not listed as an Iridium flare, and I can't think of anything else that would flare that brightly. Did anyone else see it? Does anyone know of a website where you can enter an observation, and the site gives the name of the satellite?, if such a site exists. Any help would be gratefully recieved...
  17. Thanks, Bizi. Your sketch has a nice 3d feel about it, I like the way you've rendered those long shadows. Your making me feel guilty now though, for not having a go at sketching myself yet.
  18. I've been wondering about the lighting on your rig. Some years ago I was asked to help out on a North Sea fishing boat for a couple of trips. I only agreed to go because I thought that in the middle of the North Sea I'd get fantastic dark skies, but I hadn't allowed for the ruddy great floodlights they used to light the deck. Couldn't see a thing! I did ask the skipper if he could turn 'em of for a while, but he just mumbled something about regulations - gotta be visible to other shipping, apparently. Looking at the photo's of your rig though, are there any gantries below the level of the main deck that you could use?
  19. I remember the original series. It was truly groundbreaking and won many awards, and was one of those rare tv moments that touched all who saw it. I've seen some of the youtube footage, and in places it still brings a lump to the throat. Awesome.
  20. I'm getting the same as you rwg...
  21. No. I'm not joking. How can you judge a series on one episode?. Horses for courses I suppose, but given a choice between Heroes and Casualty/Over the Rainbow/Have I got... etc I know what I'd rather watch.
  22. WOT? Yeah, the last series wasn't as gripping as the first, but this program was still one of the best things on tv IMHO, despite the vagaries of BBC2 program scheduling.
  23. Nice piece on SkyNews (freeview 82)
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