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Petergoodhew

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Everything posted by Petergoodhew

  1. I'v been using the SX AO for a few months. As Olly says, I use it to keep the second scope on my dual rig perfectly aligned and to compensate for differential flexure. At 1200m focal length, and with minor differences between the scopes (tube, focuser, camera, and adapters are all slightly different) - and for 30 minute exposures - the flexure is enough to cause problems. The AO fixes it perfectly. I wouldn't recommend it as an adaptive optics solution (SX call it Active Optics, not Adaptive Optics). Yes the device is fast, but as Sara says, when I tried it my Lodestar X2 just wasn't able to
  2. Thanks Peter. In my experience these ultra-faint targets can only be captured with very clear dark skies, and with the moon well below the horizon. Otherwise the signal gets drowned out by the sky background. Even in Spain, with 3nm/5nm Ha/OIII filters, I can't see any trace of them if the moon is above the horizon - even if it's on the other side of the sky. So now I just don't even bother trying until the moon has gone - unless I'm shooting a bright target (which I never seem to do these days!) Peter
  3. Thanks Goran, I had the coordinates from the original discovery so I knew where to look. I then keep increasing exposures, binning and stretching the images until something appears. In this case almost nothing was visible with 1800s bin 2x2 subs - hence I had to go bin 3x3.
  4. StDr 1 - a possible planetary nebula in the constellation of Taurus, discovered by Xavier Strottner and Marcel Drechsler in November 2019. This is the first time it has been imaged in colour. It is extremely faint - and so 1800 second exposures binned 3x3 were necessary. Astrodon Blue: 17x300" Astrodon Green: 18x300" Astrodon Red: 18x300" Astrodon Lum: 21x300" Astrodon OIII: 8x1800s bin 3x3 Astrodon Ha: 19x1800s bin 3x3 Total Integration: 20 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mou
  5. Kronberger 24 is a faint planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered by Matthias Kronberger in 2010. Reference: <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/0910.0465v1.pdf" rel="noreferrer nofollow">arxiv.org/pdf/0910.0465v1.pdf</a> Astrodon Blue: 210x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon OIII: 41x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 27x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 39 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
  6. Here you go Alistair - a typical unprocessed OIII 30 minute Bin 2x2 sub. The Ha is much much fainter. Peter
  7. Kronberger 63 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Orion . It was discovered by Austrian Mattias Kronberger who is a member of the amateur group Deep Sky Hunters. It is very faint and thus rarely imaged. Indeed my searches have found only one other image, produced by the Chart32 team in Chile. Astrodon Blue: 21x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon OIII: 48x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 26x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 42 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI612
  8. Abell 24 (PK 217 + 14.1) is a faint planetary nebula in the constellation of Canis Minor. Astrodon Blue: 20x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon Ha: 37x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 23.5 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
  9. Olly, in my case the rings ARE the alignment device - there's nothing else to align them! I decided to exploit Alistair's point that the slightest turn of a bolt moves everything. In my case, with focal length of 1200 and small sensor (my field radius is 0.36 degrees) I needed a very precise way of aligning. Assuming I want, say, 90% overlap between images I need to adjust the alignment to around 0.04 degrees. My simple solution was to stick heavy-duty steel brackets on the extra rings that are as close as possible to the focusers, with hex bolts connecting them. I can now, using an allen key,
  10. Thanks Dave. I do enjoy a challenge - and some of these are really challenging! It's good to get going again after two months of cloud and rain. Happy New Year to you and the family - and the best of luck with Pixelskies in 2020. Peter
  11. EGB 4 (a nebula discovered by Ellis, Grayson, & Bond in 1984) is NOT a comet, despite it's comet-like appearance. It is an emission nebula surrounding a catacylismic binary star system called BZ Cam in the constellation of Camelopardis. It has an unusual bow-shock structure as BZ Cam (with it's associated wind) moves through the interstellar medium, similar to the bow wave in front of a ship that is moving through water. BZ Cam is believed to be a white dwarf star that is accreting mass from an accompanying main-sequence star of 0.3-0.4 solar masses. It is around 2,500 light y
  12. Many thanks Olly. If I hadn't visited Les Granges so many times I would never have learnt so much from you that has made shooting and processing such difficult images possible!
  13. Yes Steve its a real oddity that I find really beautful. Apparentlly the one-sidedness stems from the fact that it's moving through space and creating a bow-shock as it moves forwards. The strange "braided" look comes from the shock wave hitting the ISM.
  14. Thanks Brendan. The 71.5 hours was almost all done using just one scope due to some problems with the other scope that I've only just resolved. As you know the weather has been dreadful in Extramadura, like elsewhere in Spain - so it took me two months to capture this stupidly faint target!
  15. Hartl-Dengel-Weinberger 3 (HDW 3, PK149-09.1, PNG149.4-09.2) is an extremely faint ancient planetary nebula in the constellation Perseus. It is so faint that it is very rarely imaged. Astrodon Blue: 17x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Lum: 39x600" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon OIII: 51x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 76x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 71.5 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
  16. Rodd it's in Cassiopeia: RA 03 03 47.01 DEC +64 54 35.7 It would fit really well at 1000mm.
  17. Just a slight edge crop Rodd to tidy things up.
  18. HFG1 (PK 136+05) is a very old large, low-surface-brightness planetary nebula in Cassiopeia that was discovered by Heckathorn, Fesen, and Gull in 1982. It surrounds, and was produced by, a binary star system (V664 Cas) that is moving rapidly through our Galaxy. The star is moving towards the lower left of the image. As HFG1 plows through the interstellar medium, a bluish bowshock is produced; and a red trail of gas is left behind in its wake. Astrodon Blue: 10x300" Astrodon Green: 10x300" Astrodon Lum: 11x600" Astrodon Red: 10x300" Astrodon OIII: 35x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 33
  19. Thanks. There's a chap called Sakib Rasool (starsurfin.co.uk) who sends me lots of requests for me to image the more obscure (i.e. challenging!) planetary nebulae. Peter
  20. Kronberger 61 (Kn 61). also known as the Soccer Ball nebula, is a recently-discovered planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered in January 2011 by Mattias Kronberger, who is a member of the amateur group Deep Sky Hunters. It is very small (diameter of 104 arcsecs). It is barely visible on the second Palomar Optical Sky Survey (POSS-II) blue plate scan, suggesting a surface brightness well below magnitude 25 per square arcsecond - and at an estimated distance of 13,000 light years (1). It is a highly filamentary bubble with a high expansion velocity of 67.6 km/secon
  21. DeHt5 (Dengel-Hartl 5) is a large faint ancient planetary nebula in the constellation Cepheus. It is estimated to be one of the closest planetary nebulae at a distance of 1300-1600 light years. The faint red filaments at the top right hand corner of the image are the supernova remnant called SNR 110.3+11.3. Astrodon Blue: 19x300" Astrodon Green: 19x300" Astrodon Lum: 20x600" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon Ha: 25x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon OIII: 26x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 34 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 Cameras: QSI6120wsg8
  22. MWP1 (Motch-Werner-Pakull 1) also known as The Methuselah Nebula is a rarely-imaged faint bi-polar planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus. It is one of the largest known planetary nebulae - spanning some 15 light years. It lies around 4,500 light years from Earth. Astrodon Blue: 16x300" Astrodon Green: 16x300" Astrodon Lum: 18x600" Astrodon Red: 16x300" Astrodon Ha: 35x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon OIII: 37x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 43 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
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