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Petergoodhew

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Petergoodhew last won the day on January 13 2020

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About Petergoodhew

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  1. Thanks Alistair - this almost sounds too good to be true. As you know, I've no ability to sync both scopes other than doing a lot of manual fiddling. I have to calculate the time of the flip and make sure the slave scope isn't imaging or guiding until the flip is done. Another bonus is the abiity to do sky flats - something else that SGP doesn't support. Have you come across anything that SGP does and Voyager can't do?
  2. Alistair, I'm intrigued by the Voyager support for dual rig setups. Does it manage to pause the slave before a meridian flip and then restart it after the flip?
  3. I'v been using the SX AO for a few months. As Olly says, I use it to keep the second scope on my dual rig perfectly aligned and to compensate for differential flexure. At 1200m focal length, and with minor differences between the scopes (tube, focuser, camera, and adapters are all slightly different) - and for 30 minute exposures - the flexure is enough to cause problems. The AO fixes it perfectly. I wouldn't recommend it as an adaptive optics solution (SX call it Active Optics, not Adaptive Optics). Yes the device is fast, but as Sara says, when I tried it my Lodestar X2 just wasn't able to
  4. Thanks Peter. In my experience these ultra-faint targets can only be captured with very clear dark skies, and with the moon well below the horizon. Otherwise the signal gets drowned out by the sky background. Even in Spain, with 3nm/5nm Ha/OIII filters, I can't see any trace of them if the moon is above the horizon - even if it's on the other side of the sky. So now I just don't even bother trying until the moon has gone - unless I'm shooting a bright target (which I never seem to do these days!) Peter
  5. Thanks Goran, I had the coordinates from the original discovery so I knew where to look. I then keep increasing exposures, binning and stretching the images until something appears. In this case almost nothing was visible with 1800s bin 2x2 subs - hence I had to go bin 3x3.
  6. StDr 1 - a possible planetary nebula in the constellation of Taurus, discovered by Xavier Strottner and Marcel Drechsler in November 2019. This is the first time it has been imaged in colour. It is extremely faint - and so 1800 second exposures binned 3x3 were necessary. Astrodon Blue: 17x300" Astrodon Green: 18x300" Astrodon Red: 18x300" Astrodon Lum: 21x300" Astrodon OIII: 8x1800s bin 3x3 Astrodon Ha: 19x1800s bin 3x3 Total Integration: 20 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mou
  7. Kronberger 24 is a faint planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus. It was discovered by Matthias Kronberger in 2010. Reference: <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/0910.0465v1.pdf" rel="noreferrer nofollow">arxiv.org/pdf/0910.0465v1.pdf</a> Astrodon Blue: 210x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon OIII: 41x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 27x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 39 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
  8. Here you go Alistair - a typical unprocessed OIII 30 minute Bin 2x2 sub. The Ha is much much fainter. Peter
  9. Kronberger 63 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Orion . It was discovered by Austrian Mattias Kronberger who is a member of the amateur group Deep Sky Hunters. It is very faint and thus rarely imaged. Indeed my searches have found only one other image, produced by the Chart32 team in Chile. Astrodon Blue: 21x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon OIII: 48x1800s bin 2x2 Astrodon Ha: 26x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 42 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI612
  10. Abell 24 (PK 217 + 14.1) is a faint planetary nebula in the constellation of Canis Minor. Astrodon Blue: 20x300" Astrodon Green: 20x300" Astrodon Red: 20x300" Astrodon Ha: 37x1800s bin 2x2 Total Integration: 23.5 hours Captured on my dual rig in Spain. Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length) Cameras: QSI6120wsg8 Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS
  11. Olly, in my case the rings ARE the alignment device - there's nothing else to align them! I decided to exploit Alistair's point that the slightest turn of a bolt moves everything. In my case, with focal length of 1200 and small sensor (my field radius is 0.36 degrees) I needed a very precise way of aligning. Assuming I want, say, 90% overlap between images I need to adjust the alignment to around 0.04 degrees. My simple solution was to stick heavy-duty steel brackets on the extra rings that are as close as possible to the focusers, with hex bolts connecting them. I can now, using an allen key,
  12. Thanks Dave. I do enjoy a challenge - and some of these are really challenging! It's good to get going again after two months of cloud and rain. Happy New Year to you and the family - and the best of luck with Pixelskies in 2020. Peter
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