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TheMightyKong

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Posts posted by TheMightyKong


  1. Yep, NZ looks good to me too. My wife, 45, was diagnosed last year with the Big C - an extremely rare type for her age and incurable. To say the Sword of Damocles is hanging over us and our 6 year old daughter is putting it lightly. All I want to do after a day at work and caring duties is get out under the stars to take my mind of it and I can't because of our hideous weather. If the worst happened, I would consider NZ - I have the skills they want there - although may need to stay here for other reasons like aging parents/in-laws etc. Despite my patriotism, there seems to be nothing here but bad news, constantly ripped off by the government and having to suffer our horrible, unpredictable climate. I am sick to death of it - and even my main hobbies, Astro, gardening and cycling are constantly blighted by our weather. Cycling is at least possible. But Astro here is a joke. Like cloud watching in Saudi Arabia would be.

    Steve

    Thats terrible so sorry to hear that. I suppose it really changes everything.


  2. Australia for me, sunny weather, clear skies nice culture and quality of life, Rupert Murdoch no longer lives there; down side is I'd be scared of stepping on something in the dark that fights back.. Good thing about the UK is the wimpy wildlife.

    Closer to home south of France seems nice though I've never been there. Must ask Olly.

    Closer


  3. They'll all different to SPM. SPM was the best precisely for his enthusiasm but I feel he had difficulty conveying that enthusiasm in this last programs under the burden of age, infirmity and illness. I think Brian Cox is pretty good and will expand the appeal of the program to other demographics. He does have that stylistic tic of saying everything is amazing and staring off into the distance; but I can forgive him for that.

    Kermode does Cox


  4. I didn't use a cubicle and I didn't notice about the toilet lights. Can't comment on the ladies loos but did notice a little flicker on the big screen and the presentation disaster was averted by the presenter in question pluging his laptop to a charger on another socket. Could it have gone more smoothly? Sure but to be honest it hardly bothered me and I thoroughly enjoyed the day.

    Highlight for me was Alan Bond's talk about Skylon and the SABRE rocket engine.. very exciting.


  5. There was 10% discount on Televue EPs on The Widescreen Centre stand (and you could be served by David Nagler and his wife) and there seemed to be some level of discounting on many of the other stands.

    I think that price is the same for all TV at the show - Green Witch, downstairs, had the same prices on Televue eyepieces and powermates.


  6. Really disappointed that I didn't even know this was taking place - exactly the same happenned last year, and the year before. Why is this event always so poorly advertised?? :cry:

    I see you're in North West London, the exhibit is open all day tomorrow as well. All the lectures are sold out but you can still go and look at astrostuff if you like that.


  7. Not dark matter - that's something else they (we) don't know about. Dark energy was cooked up to explain the observation that the expansion of the universe appears to have sped up, instead of being slowed down by the pull of gravity of matter in the universe. So they've come up with something that acts as a repulsive force and called it dark energy. You have to admit its a cool sounding name.


  8. I still have the first pair of bins I was given by my dad, a 10x50 'Miranda' with 'gold coated optics' (whatever that is). I got them sometime in the late 80's. When I compared them to a 10x42 opticron bino made sometime in the mid naughties a few years ago it was staggering just how dim and soft the old Miranda's looked in comparison. These are both fairly inexpensive chinese made binoculars. I don't know how the old high end binoculars compare to cheaper contemporary makes but i would expect the newer ones should be brighter though not perhaps sharper.


  9. My Dad, has a casual interest. Bought me a pop up book about soviet cosmonauts, then another book on the solar system. Actually it could have started even before that as I'm told when I was a baby my mum and my gran used to take me outside and show me the starry sky in an effort to get me to eat.

    Luckily I didn't grow up in a city.

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