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michigoose

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About michigoose

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  1. Nah! Too much like a Holiday Inn circa 1980. Those trellis bits look like plastic. MY yurt had real, knobbly, rough hewn tree branches. I remember them well because I lay in the truckle bed watching a mouse running up and down them. Marion
  2. HEY Matt! It was YOU who used that epithet, not me. I've spent most of the last year convincing 'Our Man In Kabul' that the hippie trail was a myth. Please don't blow my cover. And YES, I have slept in a yurt. It was the only time I've seriously pondered on death as an alternative solution to my predicament. 80 miles from the nearest civilisation in the Hindu Kush (Bamiyan Valley), with a 10 hour journey to get back to Kabul. I was so weak and sick with 'the usual' that I even needed two people to help me walk to the loo. The only hotel in the valley was a collection of yurts - and yurts do not have 'facilities'.
  3. At the last star party I woke up (late as usual) to find myself staring at a very bright light. Nothing supernatural, but there, in my newish (yet to be hemmed) curtain was a small, round HOLE, through which the sun was streaming. I've ironed those curtains enough times to know that there was no manufacturing fault. The hole was simply... THERE. No burn marks, no tears, no snagged threads, no frayed or dirty edges. Nothing, just a perfect, tiny (about 3mm) round HOLE. I simply cannot think what can have happened. But then I had an idea. I don't like mysteries, so I went on the web and yes, LASERS will cut fabric. In fact they are used to cut out intricate designs. So my plea is, will everybody PLEASE avoid leaving laser lights pointing at peoples property. Tents, Curtains, Granma's Unmentionables on the Washing Line, 'Scope Covers, anything that may get burnt. Remember lasers are industrial strength cutting equipment! PS. If anyone has a better explanation I'd be happy to hear it. No fairy rings, wizards wands or such like pls.
  4. At the last star party I woke up (late as usual) to find myself staring at a very bright light. Nothing supernatural, but there, in my newish (yet to be hemmed) curtain was a small, round HOLE, through which the sun was streaming. I've ironed those curtains enough times to know that there was no manufacturing fault. The hole was simply... THERE. No burn marks, no tears, no snagged threads, no frayed or dirty edges. Nothing, just a perfect, tiny (about 3mm) round HOLE. I simply cannot think what can have happened. But then I had an idea. I don't like mysteries, so I went on the web and yes, LASERS will cut fabric. In fact they are used to cut out intricate designs. So my plea is, will everybody PLEASE avoid leaving laser lights pointing at peoples property. Tents, Curtains, Granma's unmentionables on the Washing Line, 'Scope Covers, anything that may get burnt. Remember lasers are industrial strength cutting equipment! PS. If anyone has a better explanation I'd be happy to hear it. No fairy rings, wizards wands or such like pls.
  5. When: December 1972 Where: Sitting on an almost empty beach, looking out over the Indian Ocean.... Each day towards evening a dozen or so people would gradually gather to sit on the beach and watch the sailboats of the local fishermen come in to unload their catch, silhouetted against a beautiful setting sun on the western horizon. Like the fishermen, we all slept on the beach, under the palm trees. We'd sometimes paddle in the shallows and marvel at the tiny flecks of phosphorescent light in the surf. Later we'd stroll over to the tiny, palm thatched beach cafe, almost hidden among the palms and holding only about half a dozen small tables and rickety chairs. We'd while away the evenings writing, talking, drinking fresh lime juice and swapping travellers info. One evening I happened to look up and realised that a band of the sky straight above was so full of stars it could only be the milky way. I returned a year later and found to my horror that, where there had only been a few Portugese style bungalows hidden among the palm trees, and water drawn from one of the local wells, there was now a neon lit hotel, probably with running 'hot & cold'. It was the day Paradise put up a parking lot and I've never returned since. Googled images of Baga Beach, Goa, now show no more than rows and rows of sun loungers with scarcely a palm tree visible. Brings tears to my eyes. Here are then and now photos.
  6. Ain't it grand having a husband with a hobby! No more hunting for something other than socks. Although I gather socks might just be OK for any of you guys. Marion
  7. Just a few months ago Dana and I visited a friend I hadn't seen for many, many years. She had one of her sons at home with her, whom I remember as a toddler - but must be in his later 20s now. He didn't remember me, but said it was great to meet one of his mother's bridesmaids as he'd seen us in the wedding photographs; and was I the one in the dark glasses as he and his brother had always thought I must be so coooowel. Oh no - just early days photo-sensitive glasses! Marion
  8. Hi Kuldeep! Whereabouts in India are you? I've been there a few times and love it there! Marion (Michigander's wife - an astro widow)
  9. Oooh I think everybody's missed this part of your question - even Michigander, my husband. I'm just a grass widow on this site (I only post occasionally on the social threads), but I do believe that I can answer this part. For most purposes, all objects will seem to move across the field of view at the same speed. This is because the apparent movement is caused by OUR rotation here on earth. AFAIK - the various objects do move at different speeds, but from our perspective that difference is so slight that the relative movement of the planets only becomes apparent over days and weeks - or even, in the case of the stars, constellations and DSO's over many millenia Marion
  10. I have a little book in my possession called 'The Ladies Pocket Magazine - Part 2 -1829' It's full of fashion plates, little moral stories and poems. I've no idea where it came from. I think it was in my parents' bookcase although I never noticed it as a child. Glad I checked stuff out before clearing their house!! My only other prized book is a first (possibly only) edition of Edmund Dulac's 'Fairy Tales of the Allied Nations', published during the First World War. It was a birthday gift to my mother as a small child. Its condition is 'critical' so far as binding and fragility of the text pages is concerned, but the plates are in perfect nick. Absolutely beautiful. If you've never come across Edmund Dulac, then google him. He was an amazing book illustrator. Marion
  11. Actually I think there is a serious point about service in the US. American business has a 'hire and fire' culture. I guess it helps to keep from getting fired if you make sure nobody has reason to complain.
  12. I think we'll have to agree to differ on this. It rings absolutely no chimes with my professional attitudes or standards. I find it so bizarre it would be funny if it didn't put me in mind of the billions of taxpayers pounds (not to mention my plundered pension) which must be wasted on this kind of thing. I now understand why your users keep changing their minds about what they want. As I say, I'll not respond further, not least because I find your posts above patronising and condescending. YOU may think you 'should' do things in certain ways, but I am under no such obligation. Having retired after nearly 40 years of delivering systems on time, within budget, to customer satisfaction, and with no 'Poste Mortem' corrections or amendments to be scheduled, leaves me quite satisfied with my own professional record of achievement - thank you very much.
  13. Hmmm - When I first read your post I was a bit disturbed as I wondered if I'd 'rattled your cage'. On second reading, I don't think you understood my post. Sorry, but there's no way I'm 'culturally programmed' to assume women are less competent than men. I'm female and, for a few short years, attended one of the top academic girls schools in the UK. No way was there any hint of women being less competent. In fact when I went into the big wide world I was bewildered that I, as a female, seemed to be viewed differently to my male colleagues. In fact, my post simply stresses that, in my observations of the many people who've worked for me, and with me, women make better programmers than men. I suppose one might quibble about the definition of 'better', but my reference was commercial applications programmers. Women tend to give more attention to detail and tidyness, which produces working programs which are clearer and easier to maintain - an essential requirement in a commercial environment where changing business and statutory demands neccessitate periodic changes to programs. Men, conversely, tend to be more 'innovative' and are possibly more suited to developing system software such as network handlers and operating systems. With regard to the end result having taken the same amount of time, I can't agree. Any Project Management training would drum into one the necessity of Quality Review and Control at every stage of a project. Not just essential to avoid disaster, but to manage the budget, since the later an error is discovered the more expensive it is to correct (sometimes by orders of magnitude). My experience is that the tidy, careful programmer may take a day longer to write a program, but the enthusiastic innovator will still be crashing around a tangled maze of code trying to find program bugs days after the 'tidy' program is fully tested and in the library awaiting release. I'm not saying women are better, or more intelligent that men. I'm just saying that their tendency to tidyness, attention to detail, and longer attention span (Vital to keeping a mental hold on a thread of logic) makes them better programmers. Or.... LOL - Did you think I was a man trying to suck up to the ladies here. Parallel Parking? I'm married to an American guy who is used to wide open spaces. He tries hard here in the UK, but still occasionally gives up and lets me do it.
  14. LOL_Lulu - Do I come across as a real nerd? Pinchbeck specs and pinched face? In fact I went into computers like so many of my generation because the one thing we simply couldn't stomach was the idea of a boring respectable profession. Not really. Building commercial computer applications uses a host of different talents, interests and stimuli throughout the life-cycle of any project. Initially - interviewing and fact-finding (meeting lots of varied people - pen-pushers to corporate strategists - and being curious to understand what they do and why); - then analysing and building a 'logically clean' model of the facts (hopefully exploiting any associated opportunities and resolving any existing problems) ; - then designing an empirical system which reflects that model; - then writing technical specifications to translate that empirical system into computer procedures; - then (and only then) getting down to the machine, and programming instructions to make it do what you want it to do; - then demonstrating the system to your customers (giving them plenty of opportunity and support to check out any aspect they please) to ensure that it works in accordance with their requirements (an opportunity to 'sell' the system to the more doubtful of your customers - if you dare); - then documenting clearly how the system works so that both technicians and the customers can use the system without interminable calls for help (no such thing as a dedicated helpdesk in those days); - then using the manuals you've just written to create presentations and give training to users and operators; - then the suspense of 'go-live' date. - FINALLY, the end of project party. Booze, food, booze, music, booze, dancing - WOW! London had some great little bistros in the late 60s. Oops I've forgotten a bit - Project Management and Control - simply keeping all stakeholders interested, committed and up-to-date whilst you're beavering away on their behalf. As for hobbies - I'm far too busy ... -gardening, -needlework, -housekeeping our old, and tiny, PC (LOL - an SGL member just sold us a secondhand one which is comparatively HUGE - thanks Chris - now that I've got it set up as Michigander and I want I'll be able to find a hobby eh?), -decorating, -repairing anything that needs it, (latest - replacing leaking roof vent in our camper - it now needs that bit of recently replaced bodywork to be primed and laquered, oh - and new lightproof curtains for Salisbury - otherwise I'll be in trouble with you all), -mentoring (on the web) someone who has similar abuse issues I suffered as a child (hard work, but incredibly rewarding), -theatre, -museums, -concerts and art galleries, -showing my husband this amazingly cool country we live in - LOL - ya don't need hobbies when you're open to each and every challenge going. I used to read a lot - but almost no time now. A good thing because if a book ain't good enough to keep me absorbed and impressed I feel less guilty about abandoning it.
  15. Yup Astro-Baby. Women make MUCH better programmers than men. It's the better attention to detail (hey you guys out there, don't blame me - it's down to primal nest-building instinct). Of the 4 progs I ever knew who regularly got an error free 1st test, 3 were female. And the fourth (the male) ran clean only after the first failed run telling him to open his files before trying to read them. Those were the days. Hail Hail Commander Grace! Ada, Lady Lovelace too! Incidentally, my avatar is the first machine I worked on (machine code). ICT 1301 circa 1962. The barrel printer was housed in the east wing and the card reader and punch in the west wing and annex respectively. Better get off here. I'm gate-crashing hubby's astro site.
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