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PortugueseGazer

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About PortugueseGazer

  • Rank
    Nebula

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astronomy, Martial Arts and Life.
  • Location
    Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal
  1. Thank you guys for the quick replies. The reason I opened this topic was because I spend most of my time at my backyard, which is dark when looking south ( no street lights, just fields), but when I gaze north, I get bombarded with street lights. I usually spend around 10 minutes gazing to the north sky but it seems only a couple seconds are enough to ruin adaptation.. Well, it seems my new strategy will be starting my night observations facing north and spend most of my time facing south where I get the most darkness. Thanks guys, you are great
  2. Reading this made me feel dumb.. So, the question here is how can a wave act as a particle and a particle as a wave right? Then someone said that it depends on the way we see it right( dumbed it down so I could understand :x )? Much like when we see a guy at the beach staring at the horizon, some say he is gazing at the horizon, some say that he is thinking but in reality he is trying to Fart (I don't know any other word to substitute that word, sorry ). So, we can only be certain if we ask him directly right? In that same thought, we just need to "ask" the particle why it is behaving like that but we don't know it's "language" so we can only assume right? "How can a particle act like a wave?" Can't we assume that much like the ocean, that stays rather flat until some force makes it "wavy" (the wind), there is a force acting on the particle and changing its behaviour? Sorry if I sound so dumb, I'm just trying to understand a subject my brain wasn't made to understand
  3. Hello guys, I have 3 questions. 1-How long should I wait until my eyes adapt to the night sky? 2-Is it true that when our eyes are adapted, it only takes one look at a street lamp to destroy said adaptation? 3-Does a binocular need to cooldown before I start gazing like a telescope? Thanks in advance.
  4. Hello and welcome to SGL. I also started with a binocular, The "Nikon Aculon 12x50". You won't regret starting out this way(if you have patience) for a couple reasons: 1- Wide field of view (FOV) making it easy for you to find stuff; 2-Set up time is less than 3min if you use a tripod, other wise, its 0min; 3-It is simply the best way to learn your way around the night sky (learning to star hop); 4-You are using both eyes meaning you will actually see more even with 50mm aperture; 5- You will get some great views of a lot of Messier objects (m31-Andromeda galaxy, m42- Orion nebula, m45- Pleiades, a lot of open clusters and star clusters,etc) and the brightest planets ( venus, mars, Jupiter and a couple moons and saturn) 6- It costs less than the average beginner telescope; 7- Because you will learn to star hop easier, once you decide to jump to a telescope, you won't need a goto setup meaning you can save money for a larger aperture telescope. 8-Portability ( Binoculars are the most portable night sky visual instrument out there) 9-Even if you buy a telescope, it is always good to have a binocular as guide or for a quick gaze when the clouds give you a break By the end of the month I'll order another Binocular (Helios Quantum4 15x70) Have fun with whatever you choose mate
  5. You sir, are a very lucky man...
  6. Welcome to SGL mate! Enjoy your stay.
  7. Thanks a lot for your reply mate. Now I wont feel completly dumb when this expression shows up. So much like a parsec or AU, an arcsec/minute is a unit that measures distance right? 1arcsec= ~773km
  8. I am also very interested to know what an arcsecond is and it's applications because I have seen people use the expression several times.. A small resume would do worlds to me. Thanks in advance.
  9. I can't coment on technicalities since i don't own any telescope but those pictures are nice! One question on Saturn Image: Is that thin black gap on the rings (to the left) a hint of the Cassini's Division or are my eyes playing tricks on me? Hope you get some answers to your questions Clear Skies.
  10. Lucky!! I wish I had a Telescope when I was 6... I'm pretty sure such event won't happen in my lifetime again Yeah, if any of its pieces were to hit Earth... Bye bye. xD Thanks for the warm welcome
  11. It's an Orb! you took a picture of a ghost
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