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christhebrit

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About christhebrit

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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    chris_the_brit@hotmail.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Music, mainly rock.
  • Location
    York, UK

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  1. Gotta be happy with that image :-) I remember doing the same around this time last year. I finally got the camera to keep the exopsure going until i let go of the button (with assistance). I was confused about just how good the image looked. Chris
  2. There are a few possible reasons, or even the sum of all of them. 1. The telescope requires some time to cool down. Giving the recent chill and that many people put their heaters on high, there may be quite a difference in temperature. This can cause distortion in the air inside the tube, leading to an unclear image. Try to let it cool for an hour or so if you're looking for high magnification. 2. Bad seeing. This is best ovserved by looking at stars with your eyes (no telescope), the more they twinkle- the more distortion in the atmosphere above. Some websites show the jetstreams above, it'
  3. I've recently ordered the 18.2 (hard to find as many stores seem out of stock). My thinking behind this was that it would act as a 9.1 with my 2x barlow and 3.6 with my 5x powermate. I welcome the 5 as it would give me 240x magnification. If only TV could offer something that would get rid of the clouds.... Chris
  4. Additional. Oh dear.... I think I've had the blondest moment ever. I tried this 5 nights ago and have just readlised something. When I took the diagonal out, I didn't add a spacer. (I have a spacer on the DSLR adapter when I use that). I'll give it another go. Thanks for clearing up my issue with the lens again :-) Chris
  5. Cheers Olly, I'll try that. I ask as I couldn't get it to focus, maybe I'll try during the day first. My CMOS is a QHY5L-II, I'm just getting to play with it due to weather and work. Just curious, but why are there 2 lenses with it? Fisheye I think is for pointing it at the sky to record meteors etc. Normal I'm not sure. Chris
  6. Trial and error :-P I bought a motor for my EQ2 a while back. I practiced on the moon. Later I practiced on a star. (moon rotates at a different rate to stars) Keeping that setting, I practiced with jupiter. (playing with exposure settings). With the motor, you set it so earths' rotation is being countered and the object is still. (hence why the moon id a slight bit different, it orbits us) Bad alignment will see the object move up/ down- if you keep using the same spot, try making a marker for each foot once it's a good spot. Remember the mount needs to be level also :-P Chris
  7. I'm not trying to use the DSLR with the powermate, I just attach it with an adapter. I'm comparing my CMOS with the DSLR, as the DSLR uses no lens. I can't get focus on the CMOS without the lens. Do I need the lens on the CMOS? How do I use the CMOS with lens in a powermate due to the screw in the lense? Chris
  8. Hi all, I'm about to ask a daft question, but I'll explain a bit. The bit I know; DSLR. Using this camera, I know to remove the lense and attach the camera directly to the telescope using an adapter. This in turn makes the telescope the lense. It focuses on the sensor and I'm able to take photos (good for Deep Sky Objects and the moon, but planetary is very small) The bit I don't know; CMOS. I have had success using a CMOS camera only with the lense on the front. I can't use it like the DLSR as it doesn't focus an image on the sensor. The image of Jupiter for example appears small with the l
  9. Using a DSLR on planets, I recommend very short exposured (less than a second). For this reason your telescope doesn't really need to track or be aligned very well. If you only see a white ball, go for shorter exposures (the planet may seem darker, but you get some detail). Using a DSLR on DSOs, it's the opposite with long exposures. Tracking is a must as you'll quickly get star trails. Alignment is also important, but depending on how long your exposures are, will determine how well it should be. For both I recommend working on a good alignment, if anything it's good practice. M42 Orion Nebul
  10. Hi all, I'm about to ask a daft question, but I'll explain a bit. The bit I know; DSLR. Using this camera, I know to remove the lense and attach the camera directly to the telescope using an adapter. This in turn makes the telescope the lense. It focuses on the sensor and I'm able to take photos (good for Deep Sky Objects and the moon, but planetary is very small) The bit I don't know; CMOS. I have had success using a CMOS camera only with the lense on the front. I can't use it like the DLSR as it doesn't focus an image on the sensor. The image of Jupiter for example appears small with the l
  11. Hi all, I'm about to ask a daft question, but I'll explain a bit. The bit I know; DSLR. Using this camera, I know to remove the lense and attach the camera directly to the telescope using an adapter. This in turn makes the telescope the lense. It focuses on the sensor and I'm able to take photos (good for Deep Sky Objects and the moon, but planetary is very small) The bit I don't know; CMOS. I have had success using a CMOS camera only with the lense on the front. I can't use it like the DLSR as it doesn't focus an image on the sensor. The image of Jupiter for example appears small with the l
  12. I didn't read alot of the relies to be honest- there are alot so far. For me, it's the experience. I can read how to make bread, which is different to making bread. I see see an image of Jupiter, or I can find and see it. That pretty much sums it up. Chris
  13. DeLite 18.2 en route.... maybe the wife won't notice :-|

  14. EQ5 may not be best if you want the larger scope and plan to image. Remember, the bigger scopes collect more light, but they're heavier. Heavier scopes tend to be used less due to moving them around. (Unlike smaller 'grab & go' set ups) I'd recommend the 150 as it'll show what to expect in a much larger scope when you go down that route. As the telescope is lighter, it'll allow for more equipment on the EQ5 (although I'd suggest the HEQ5). Chris
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