Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_globular_clusters_winners.thumb.jpg.13b743f39f721323cb5d76f07724c489.jpg

Beardy Bob

Members
  • Content Count

    315
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

17 Good

About Beardy Bob

  • Rank
    Star Forming
  1. This has been sat boxed up in my garage for a couple of years now since moving to a town with lots of trees and light pollution! It's in great condition optically and physically other than a scratch on the outer paintwork that it's had since I got it (see the bottom picture). Comes complete with tube rings as seen on the pictures. Buyer can collect or I can meet at the Kelling Star Party with it as I'm only a few miles down the road. Reduced to £160. Bob
  2. Thanks Mike. Unfortunately there were no EPOCH coordinates and the database images aren't centred on the star I want, so I wouldn't know where it was. I really like the idea of an image made by meaningfully pointed at her star anyway. If only I still had all my kit! Thankfully Starlight1 is on it for me with his nice, newly refurbished camera! That 2.5m telescope produces some nice images though doesn't it!
  3. Whoops! I remember making that kind of mistake!
  4. Hiya. You're quite right, that's not the right place. I see what's happened though. That image is from RA 9 hours, and the star you're looking for is at RA 9 minutes! Nice image though, really crisp. You're camera is clearly behaving itself again! It's in Andromeda, quite close to the great Andromeda galaxy with the naked eye.
  5. Have you had any luck with getting some images?
  6. I've just noticed you're in Norfolk, Starlight1. Same here. You must be suffering from the same weather as me!
  7. Yes, that sounds great. It'll largely be a star field with a small galaxy (or two) in it, so Ha, Lum at 1x1 sounds good for tight stars. I'm guessing standard RGB colour will be the quickest way to add some colour, but as long as there's some variation in star colour to pull out I don't mind between RGB/narrowband. Also, I don't insist on processing it myself. I'm capable of doing so, but didn't realise how large the frames would be! So I'm more than happy for you to do it if it's easier than sending all the subs, as long as it's full res.
  8. Yeah, definite risky going to Betelgeuse on holiday! Thanks Starlight1, that would be awesome. I don't mind which format it's in. I think it's going to be mostly stars - not much in the way of nebulae. So narrowband probably isn't necessary, but if you've got it set up that way and its easier then that's all good!
  9. I genuinely don't know, but if they're all just random stars within galaxies I reckon they can just make it up! I'm not telling my daughter that though. She's very pleased and a photo will hopefully fuel her interest.
  10. Here's the other one with the location.
  11. Hi Craig. Apparently so! It would seem that it's just a random one from somewhere within ngc11 so it's not as if they've renamed Betelgeuse!
  12. Here's one of the pictures of the location. The second doesn't seem to want to upload!
  13. Hi folks. Until recently I was an avid deep sky imager, but a recent move has meant I've sold all my gear (well, most of it, keep an eye out in the classifieds for the last few bits!). Anyway, would you believe that as soon as I sell my deep sky gear off a relative buys a star for my daughter! So I was hoping that with the relevant info (below and attached) that someone could take a nice pic (or at least some decent subs for me to process) of the area centred around ngc11 (which is where her star is), so that she has a nice, sparkly, colourful picture of it. It's just away from M31 in andromeda - RA 0h 09m 32.92s, Dec 37°31' 27.90". Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Bob
  14. Well, I checked it again last night and the same result, so I plugged in an eyepiece and it was the same throught that. Firstly it's good news in that it's not a camera problem. It's also very unlikely to be a scope problem as I can't think of anything that would cause such movement in the target. The diffusion pattern was also perfectly symmetrical when I adjusted the focus off, so the collimation is fine too. For me that just leaves the seeing or thermals, which I find really odd because it's happened two days in a row and never before to anything like this extent in the last six or seven years of stargazing! The rig hasn't moved in all that time, there have been no major developments/changes in the local area that might cause increased thermals and anyway it's happening to targets in all directions. Very strange. Hopefully it'll just correct itself. Thanks for all the ideas.
  15. It certainly didn't seem logical for it to be a camera error to me either, but it's reassuring to hear someone else say it! If I'm not too tired from being up late last night trying to figure it out I'll have another shot at it tonight and investigate further.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.