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skywatcher58gb

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About skywatcher58gb

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    North West Durham, 54° 54' N
  1. A scope I have been considering is the Explore Scientific ED102 Triplet, this is f7. Also one of our members has the Altair Wave series 115 ED f7 Triplet APO. Both of these have good reviews.
  2. Hi Rockystar I have an adapted gadget box with a plastic cover with cut outs in the side for power and usb cables. This makes a nice moisture free environment for the computer. The screen is covered with red cellophane.
  3. skywatcher58gb

    M51 13-14/02/2018

    You have some very nice images using your Evostar 120 achromat, I normally image with an ED80 but also have an Evostar 120 achromat. I am considering using and it after seeing your work look forward to the new season. One question have you ever used a 0.85 focal reducer with the 120 when imaging
  4. Jupiter will be due south at about 10.30, LP should not be a problem for Jupiter if you can get your scope in a position to observe it. I was once looking at Jupiter through a fairground big wheel with all of its lights on, still saw the bands and moons.
  5. You will see plenty of DSOs with that big DOB.
  6. I would also recommend the Nortons Star Atlas, I've had the older Epoch 1950 version which i bought about 1965 and recently acquired the 2000 version. Loads of info and good star charts.
  7. Hi B77, I have the Meade LX90 and about six or seven years ago I bought a 2" 38mm SWA 70 deg EP from a company called Astronomica, which I think stopped trading. However the EP I bought I'm sure can be purchased from OpticStar and is called the Ascension, the link is as follows http://www.opticstar.com/Run/Astronomy/Astro-Accessories-Telescopes-Ascension.asp?p=0_10_5_1_1_5. I also have two Hyperion EPs 10mm and 17mm, which are OK but I always come back to this 38mm EP as it seems to go with the LX90 perfectly, it's like floating in space when looking through it. The price is not bad either at under £50 excluding P&P.
  8. Made this for my 8" Meade LX90 out of a cake tin bought from local supermarket. The cut out is about 6" dia using Baader Film. The click in tin fits perfectly onto my scope, it looks like a bought for purpose filter.
  9. Once said to my wife a few years back come and see Saturn, this was in my LX90 and the seeing was good and the view really crisp. She said 'is that it' - never to be invited out again. She can stay indoors watching Strictly or the Bake Off as far I am concerned.
  10. Do get the book 'Making Every Photon Count' by Steve Richards', this will give you a good grounding in the art of astrophotography and the insight into what you will need. Then my two pennyworth is below. Considering the planets are not good viewing for the next couple of years I would suggest starting with a deep sky setup. The tried and tested baseline setup for AP is the one I have used for the last 5 years, Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan mount, Skywatcher ED80 semi Apo. Others say the EQ6, however consider the weight difference between the EQ6 and HEQ5 before you finally purchase especially if you have to travel to a dark site and then set up. If you can set up in your garden then OK with the EQ6. Once you get this you will need a few extra items such as a decent power source, maybe a focal reducer, dew heaters and dew controller, camera adapter to fit your camera (I would suggest a Cannon DSLR as these are the most common in AP) to your scope and an intervolometer to take the required shots. After you have mastered taking tracking subs you can then go further into guided AP which will need further equipment, computer, guide camera, guide scope etc. As you can see AP takes a lot of time, money and patience and is a bit of a learning curve and that's before you tackle the processing. When you get to this stage you will realise that AP is an upward spiral of equipment such better mounts better scopes, CCD cooled cameras and so on, but don't be put off think of this as a journey and take your time getting there. I would also recommend going to your local astronomical society as they will have members well experienced in AP and you can get first hand advice.
  11. Well done Brianpr1, learning to use an EQ mount when someone shows you is good but to work it out yourself is impressive and it will stick in your mind quicker. I'm sure you will master observing faster than most, and this site is great for the tweaks that you will come across when you get more into the hobby. Good luck and clear skies.
  12. If you get this setup which is nice little scope for grab and go but before long you will be looking for bigger aperture for light grasp. Therefore the 125 may be better bet, also SCT scopes suffer from front correctors dewing up which will require a dew heater and dew controller (more cost), this will then lead to power requirements and quite frankly a 7AH battery will not last long especially using a dew heater. I use two power batteries 70AH Leisure battery and a 22AH. Happy observing whatever you choose.
  13. The tried and tested baseline setup for AP is the one I have used for the last 5 years, Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan mount, Skywatcher ED80 semi Apo. Once you get this you will need a few extra items such as a decent power source, maybe a focal reducer, dew heaters and dew controller, camera adapter to fit your camera to your scope and an intervolometer to take the required shots. After you have mastered taking tracking subs you can then go further into guided AP which will need further equipment, computer, guide camera, guide scope etc. As you can see AP takes a lot of time, money and patience and is a bit of a learning curve and that's before you tackle the processing. When you get to this stage you will realise that AP is an upward spiral of equipment such better mounts better scopes, CCD cooled cameras and so on, but don't be put off think of this as a journey and take your time getting there. I would also recommend going to your local astronomical society as they will have members well experienced in AP and you can get first hand advice.
  14. Hi Pictures of Telrad resistor mod for dew control.
  15. Hi all, I have made many dew heaters for Telrads, I use a 2 watt 1% Metal oxide film resistor 10 ohm (bought off e-bay) run from a small battery box (also bought off e-bay). The battery box is for 2 x 1.5V AA batteries with an on/off switch. The resistor is mounted just beneath the Telrad glass and the battery box is vecro fixed to the side of the Telrad. The whole fitting takes about 30 to 45 minutes. It's late now but I intend to drop a couple of photos to show how this works, anyone with a minimum of DIY experience can put this together.
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